Toyota Tundra Discussion Forum banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,294 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
After washing I used:

Nanoskin sponge (better than clay bar) with Griot's detailing spray as lubricant to remove surface contaminants.

Griot's 6" DA polisher, but I swapped out the backing plate for a 3.5".

Lake Country 4" Orange flat (not CCS) pad with Menzerna FG400 to get the majority of the scratches out.

Lake Country 4" White flat pad (not CCS) with Menzerna SF3500 to glass it out.

Wiped the whole truck down with 50% water / 50% Isopropyl Alcohol (91%).

Lake Country 4" Red flat pad (not CCS) with Menzerna Jescar Power Lock sealant.

I used Gold Plush Jr. microfiber towels for everything until the very last step when I used Adam's Seamless Microfiber to buff the sealant off.

I'm going to try the Lake Country CCS pads next time. I wasn't impressed with the separation of the pads I used.

I still need to detail wheels, tires and trim.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
271 Posts
Looks great man! What a process but I'm sure it's worth it. I got a Griots DA a few months ago but haven't purchased pads or polishes yet so thanks for the heads up on the pads
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,294 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Looks great man! What a process but I'm sure it's worth it. I got a Griots DA a few months ago but haven't purchased pads or polishes yet so thanks for the heads up on the pads
Since it was my first time, it was probably my fault that the pads didn't hold up. I'm guessing I generated too much heat by 1) doing too large of sections or 2) pressing too hard (or both). The FG400 generates a lot of heat.
 

·
Registered
2013 TRD Rock Warrior Crew Max
Joined
·
25 Posts
Nice shine!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
309 Posts
Since it was my first time, it was probably my fault that the pads didn't hold up. I'm guessing I generated too much heat by 1) doing too large of sections or 2) pressing too hard (or both). The FG400 generates a lot of heat.
It is a good practice to use 1-2 pads/panel. That is unless you clean the same pad constantly.
1. Any accumulation of debris and paint coatings on the pads scratch your paint job.
2. It eliminates you burning your pad
3. It is a trial and error of how much product to use before you get it down to a science which equates to talent.

When I do vehicle as big as the Tundra I probably go through 10-16 pads in total. Yes I reuse them, I do not to abuse the pads; I do clean them properly. Also a top polisher mixed with the right pad, compound and/or polish makes a BIG difference in time and quality.

By the way great detail work. It does feel good when the truck looks good huh!
 
  • Like
Reactions: theoat and Wacked

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,964 Posts
Since it was my first time, it was probably my fault that the pads didn't hold up. I'm guessing I generated too much heat by 1) The FG400 generates a lot of heat.
First off, the truck looks great.

FG 400 does not generate heat, it's your technique. It sounds like you're using a little too much pressure. I'm guessing this could be the problem with your pads falling apart as well. Before you start, prime the pads by spraying them with detail spray, or pad conditioner. Apply just a few dabs of polish and wipe the pad over the panel, smearing it across. The primed pad will allow the polish to "glide" and break down at a slower rate, giving you more work time and a better cut. Once the pad becomes "loaded" with polish, you will need fewer and fewer dabs to complete each panel. If you feel the pad drying out, spritz it once again to soften it up.

You can also save some time by compounding with FG400 and leaving it on, do not buff it off. Switch to your white pad and go right over it with 3500. Then you only have to buff that off. Switch pads again and apply your sealant.

Again, truck looks great!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,294 Posts
Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
It is a good practice to use 1-2 pads/panel. That is unless you clean the same pad constantly.
1. Any accumulation of debris and paint coatings on the pads scratch your paint job.
2. It eliminates you burning your pad
3. It is a trial and error of how much product to use before you get it down to a science which equates to talent.

When I do vehicle as big as the Tundra I probably go through 10-16 pads in total. Yes I reuse them, I do not to abuse the pads; I do clean them properly. Also a top polisher mixed with the right pad, compound and/or polish makes a BIG difference in time and quality.

By the way great detail work. It does feel good when the truck looks good huh!
First off, the truck looks great.

FG 400 does not generate heat, it's your technique. It sounds like you're using a little too much pressure. I'm guessing this could be the problem with your pads falling apart as well. Before you start, prime the pads by spraying them with detail spray, or pad conditioner. Apply just a few dabs of polish and wipe the pad over the panel, smearing it across. The primed pad will allow the polish to "glide" and break down at a slower rate, giving you more work time and a better cut. Once the pad becomes "loaded" with polish, you will need fewer and fewer dabs to complete each panel. If you feel the pad drying out, spritz it once again to soften it up.

You can also save some time by compounding with FG400 and leaving it on, do not buff it off. Switch to your white pad and go right over it with 3500. Then you only have to buff that off. Switch pads again and apply your sealant.

Again, truck looks great!
Thanks guys. Your expertise is so helpful! I definitely learned a lot the first time which will help me be more efficient the next time. My truck was COVERED in desert pinstripes from off-roading, some were fairly deep. I probably should have used a more aggressive pad/compound (not sure what that would be), but instead I had to polish longer and add more pressure to get them out. I'm sure that's why my pads didn't last...plus I only bought 2 orange, 2 white, and 2 red pads.

I also didn't know about priming the pad with detail spray. I guess I missed that part (or forgot that part). That will definitely help next time.

Also, if I leave the FG400 on and go over it with the SF3500 it seems like I would be defeating the purpose of using a lighter compound, or does the FG400 break down to a lighter compound as it goes on...I'm confused on this one.

BEFORE:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
309 Posts
I would have wet sanded as those look fairly bad then use the compound thereafter. By this technique it levels some of the orange peel paint job.
Wet sanding though is at the expert level and I am no expert at it. I just practiced a lot with junk yard panels:). In the end it got done. We all started out as beginners so I too can learn from others.
 
  • Like
Reactions: theoat

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,964 Posts
.

Also, if I leave the FG400 on and go over it with the SF3500 it seems like I would be defeating the purpose of using a lighter compound, or does the FG400 break down to a lighter compound as it goes on...I'm confused on this one.
]

It does sound counter productive to do this, but this is a great way to save some time. When the compound "flashes" up, or gets the hazy finish that we all know, thats the final cycle of the compound....its done all its going to do at that point. When you buff that off, you're just buffing off the residue of whats been broken down. So, that being said, the next polishing step will simply remove the residue as well as begin to work the paint into the next phase..... "jeweling".

Hope that helps

Mark
 

·
Bah! Humbug!
Joined
·
181 Posts
@Jumbo Jet can you ISO wipe between polish to help with removal? Like say between FG400 and Si1500 or between Si1500 and SF4000 and again before Power Lock?
 
  • Like
Reactions: theoat

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,730 Posts
Looks Good!
I just ordered the Griots too. Gotta figure out what else to order now !
 
  • Like
Reactions: Jaj23

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,964 Posts
@Jumbo Jet can you ISO wipe between polish to help with removal? Like say between FG400 and Si1500 or between Si1500 and SF4000 and again before Power Lock?
You can ISO, but detail spray works a little better between steps. But like I was mentioning earlier, no need to wipe between compound and polish. Just go right over the FG400 with SF4000. Then buff that clean, wipe with ISO then apply Powerlock.

For what it's worth, the Menzerna line is all meant to work together. You can buff off your SF4000 and then apply PL without an ISO. But it won't hurt anything if you prefer an ISO
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,294 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
You can ISO, but detail spray works a little better between steps. But like I was mentioning earlier, no need to wipe between compound and polish. Just go right over the FG400 with SF4000. Then buff that clean, wipe with ISO then apply Powerlock.

For what it's worth, the Menzerna line is all meant to work together. You can buff off your SF4000 and then apply PL without an ISO. But it won't hurt anything if you prefer an ISO
Thanks for this info. Is there a Menzerna product that can be applied AFTER the Power Lock or is Power Lock the last possible step?

...and by ISO do you mean Isopropyl Alcohol?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,964 Posts
PL will be your final step. You can always top it with a carnuba if you'd like, but it's not really necessary. I would recommend just putting another layer of PL on every few weeks, or as you feel it needs it.

Yes on the ISO
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,294 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
PL will be your final step. You can always top it with a carnuba if you'd like, but it's not really necessary. I would recommend just putting another layer of PL on every few weeks, or as you feel it needs it.

Yes on the ISO

@Jumbo Jet

I'm ready to do another coat of PL. I washed the truck and dried it. I also did Nanoskin on the hood and roof because they are horizontal surfaces and they already had some surface contaminates. I then wiped down the rest of the truck with Griot's detailing spray and soft microfiber. Do I need to do IPA before doing PL?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,964 Posts
Keep in mind that every time you clay/nano skin, you are removing your existing layer of Power Lock.

Your IPA wipe down will also remove any layer of wax. So wiping the whole truck with IPA will remove everything and leave you back to starting your first layer once again. To layer the PL, do your normal washes, then dry and apply PL.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,294 Posts
Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
Removed Plastidip from bumpers and grille emblem/surround. Power Lock on paint, windows and chrome. I might redo Plastidip at some point, but I kind of like the clean look of the chrome. Ideally, I'd get ICI front and rear bumpers, but that is not in the budget.

Also, my neighbors probably think I'm a freak because every time they've seen me for the past month, I've been cleaning my truck.







 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top