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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
2000 toyota tundra 4.7
Sounds like a diesel truck, cant figure out whats wrong with it.

No noise when the engine is cold but once it gets warmed up it starts , once warm the oil pressure at idle drops to less than 1/4 , goes up when driving but still has a tick to the engine no matter what speed/rpm.
Oil pump gone? lifters ? Please let me know, I have another engine i could swap in but id like to keep this one, just hit 200,000 KM

timing belt was done when the last owner had it at 190000kms , but the truck sat for a few years before i bought it

Thanks , sebastian
 

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2000 toyota tundra 4.7
Sounds like a diesel truck, cant figure out whats wrong with it.

No noise when the engine is cold but once it gets warmed up it starts , once warm the oil pressure at idle drops to less than 1/4 , goes up when driving but still has a tick to the engine no matter what speed/rpm.
Oil pump gone? lifters ? Please let me know, I have another engine i could swap in but id like to keep this one, just hit 200,000 KM

timing belt was done when the last owner had it at 190000kms , but the truck sat for a few years before i bought it

Thanks , sebastian
I drove a 88 Nissan Sentra for years for work(100 plus miles a day) gas. I come out of a clients, started it up & it sounded a big Dodge 4x4 diesel! I investigated it & a spark plug had worked it’s way out. Put it back in as it was still attached by the wire and it was fine. You might want to check the exhaust, you might have a bad donut gasket between the header pipe and the down pipe. Good luck!!!
 

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2017 Tundra Crewmax SR5 5.7L
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I just spent the last week of my life fixing this exact same issue & sound, albeit on my wife's car, ('05 Chrysler 300). You definitely have a valve train noise that needs to be addressed, and the first thing you need to do after confirming you have an adequate amount of oil is figure out if the noise is coming from the lower half of the engine or the upper half. It sounds more like upper half from the vid, but you can easily confirm this via a stethoscope or even a long handled screwdriver. Also confirm you have sufficient tension on your timing belt. Inspect all related pulleys for excess play. I'm assuming you've already checked and made sure there are no CEL's, your battery & connections are in good working order, you've checked all your fuses, fluids, etc. Having even a modest scan tool could help even further, so let me know if you have one.

After confirming you've got oil and the timing belt & accessory pulleys are all in working order, then proceed with trying to locate the problem. If the noise is coming from the upper half, (which it is most likely, probably loudest directly under valve cover), it could be anything from water pump, bearings, seals, gaskets, lifter, plenty of potential issues. My bet is the water pump though, which isn't a quick fix on these. It isn't hard, but there's a ton of stuff in the way.

2 other points...
1. Although many folks will say if your water pump is going out, you'll likely know it because you'll see an increase in temps and possibly even be facing overheating issues, but this wasn't the case for me at all. My ECT never rose above 195 and the temp reading on the dash never above halfway.

2. Others will suggest replacing the oil pump, which is not only foolish, but also misguided. The oil pump is a very simple mechanism which rarely ever fails. Moreover, the oil pump is tasked with providing flow and not pressure. It is the bearings, the clearances & the tolerances therein which provide the pressure, so don't waste life on replacing oil pumps if you experience low oil pressure unless all other avenues have been exhausted and ruled out.
 
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