Toyota Tundra Discussion Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Without getting into my situation too much, my 2015 has dust nibs in the paint on several panels. You have to hunt hard after a REAL good wash to see them. Repaint has been approved (almost $4K) and they want me to schedule it. I have brought up alternative methods but the body shop they use won't hear of that kind of repair which has me somewhat confident in their ability to do a quality job.

My concerns with any repainting are the removal of windows, windshields, gaskets and other parts in order to do this kind of work. I am a cynic and don't trust anyone's work. I am also always asking myself if I am trading problems with proposed solutions. That said; I also seek the best solution.

Factory paint - supposed to be harder due to the baking of the panel albeit it is thinner and Toyota has already proven to me that they are capable to producing a bad paint job.

Aftermarket paint - I trust that a good body shop can do a good job. The paint is also thicker and any future scratches may be much easier to deal with. However, softer paint may make it easier to scratch too. The removal of other parts has me concerned. I did not suffer a collision so not sure if this extreme will be worth it.

Looking for any thoughts and feedback on this especially from anyone that has gone through the same and gotten a repaint.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,315 Posts
You never said what your alternative solutions were.

Get the aftermarket paint and be happy. One of my friends dog clawed my 99' Tacoma so bad that the whole truck needed paint. 3k out of his pocket later and I was very happy.

Good luck
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,599 Posts
I also had the paint work approved but had concerns about painting a brand new truck, and the dealers body shop agreed that it may be better to try and correct rather than paint. After much talking and getting their guarantee that preserving some of the clear was more important rather than total removal of defects if they found a bad one, I had them fix (color sand or whatever it is that they do).

I was quite pleased with the results and there was only one tint spot under a door handle that was not totally corrected. It was just too deep to completely remove and still leave some clear. Unless I showed you, you would never see it, and it made me feel like they followed my instructions. So, in the end I felt paint correction by a quality shop was better than an repaint.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
104 Posts
One thing to consider when you trade it in they will deduct the value because it has been repainted no matter how good a job they do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
323 Posts
A re-spray (of the original factory color #) for the Tundra is only a few $K ? Seems like a reasonable price to pay. I think that they'd tape off windows, trim etc rather than remove them for this type of paint. Now if it were a complete custom re-color, then yes I can see removing all the glass and trim pieces.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,665 Posts
Paint or No Paint

I know this really does not actually answer your question; but...

I have thought about having my truck repainted at a custom specialty shop I know. Not because there is anything wrong with the paint (for me it has a much better paint job than my last three Fords and one Chevy)...but because I think one of the custom four layer diamond white pearls would be the cat’s meow.

But then I realize some darn drunk fool will hit the truck long before I wear it out or I have any paint problems.

Perhaps, that might be an option if the dealer/Toyota paid their cost and you could then apply towards a custom shop? Who knows it might cover 25% of the job?

This is the custom shop and they got an absolute fancy pants paint booth that basically takes the dirt out of the air while the car is being painted:

Carls Custom Cars

I did have a brand new car (2 miles on the meter) repainted once. A 1975 Ford Thunderbird by the dealer, because when the car came in new from the factory they readily admitted it was defective paint. This was a $500 Silver Metallic paint option but the factory screwed it up badly. I believe it was some type of four layer system as well. And had an extremely high metal content for the "sparkles". In this case the dealer made it look better than "anything" Ford has been able to produce and back then this dealer (no longer in business) had the best paint shop in the city of Houston.

I actually had two of those Silver T-Birds (long story), that is why there are two cost figures (one hand written) on the window sticker. The first Silver Luxury Group was $493 and the second was $542 (inflation).

Like "all" Ford’s I owned it too was a POS (exception to the POS statement - 1964 F100)

A great dealer with a great paint shop should be able to do a good job.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
...

The alternative is basically what Azblue has mentioned as I have followed his experience with the same issue.

As to the value being affected by paint work, I researched that and found it to be somewhat of a myth. It might slow down a private sale? maybe for folks that are afraid of it but as far as trade I consulted with several dealers and yes, I know they are liars. It is considered factory warranty work and not aftermarket collision work. Warranty is honored after the work and then some (by the body shop). If someone can prove otherwise, I am all ears as I threw this in their face pretty hard and caused me great disappointment with this truck & entire experience. If I could prove this I am the level of personality that will go out of my way and pay lawyers to help me make lots of noise but with no concrete evidence; will not waste any more time on it.

2014SR5, no this is a sand down to bare metal gig with full primer / new paint. Even with a respray I believe they would need to be able to cover all edges completely as to prevent edges to the paint work. I saw the work order and the removal of lots of parts (lights, moldings, gaskets, etc).

BigTexTundra, neat idea and if I planned on keeping this truck forever I would definitely consider it. However, I will be trading this in for a Ford the first chance I get. ;) And I will be bringing a bright flashlight and magnifying glass when I pick it up. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,115 Posts
Factory paint - supposed to be harder due to the baking of the panel


I don't think your assumptions about paint hardness are really correct. I don't believe how the paint is cured affects the hardness. It affects the rate at which solvents (chemical that allow it to be applied as a liquid) evaporate from it once it is on the car in solid form.

In my opinion this all depends on the paint shop, but if you find the right shop it will be better than factory. Hardness isn't the big difference, it is prep. A human being can clean and prep a panel with more care, probably use higher quality paints with more layers of clear.

As you are witnessing for yourself, the weakness of a mass production paint job applied via robotic arms as the truck comes down the conveyor belt is more contaminants and sometimes uneven or imperfect coverage. After a couple years I noticed some imperfections on my crewmax. Dust under the paint in one or two spots and even some tiny spots down by where the wheel well transitions to the rocker panels where they missed it with the base and primer but went over it with the clear, so you have spots about the size of the tip of a pen where you see bare sheet metal under the clear.

I touched it up and moved on. Eventually those panels were hit and repainted. When the aftermarket shop did the repaint they did it with the panels on the truck without stripping everything off. I have no idea what technique they used but I didn't see any edges or anything. I have had multiple repaints, and none of the issues I have ever had stemmed from the fact that the car wasn't gutted prior to the re spray. They have been more due to wavy paint and imperfections caused by poor body work.

It is hard to say and to me it depends on how prevalent the dirt spots are. If they're all over and obvious, maybe worth it. If it's only a few spots, I might be inclined to let it go. A repaint could bring more quality control headaches to deal with. And you know dings, dents, scratches, and accidents will happen down the line anyway. Unless they are glaring and obvious enough that the truck looks really bad I might let it go until there is some more wear and tear on the paint to deal with.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
I also had the paint work approved but had concerns about painting a brand new truck, and the dealers body shop agreed that it may be better to try and correct rather than paint. After much talking and getting their guarantee that preserving some of the clear was more important rather than total removal of defects if they found a bad one, I had them fix (color sand or whatever it is that they do).

I was quite pleased with the results and there was only one tint spot under a door handle that was not totally corrected. It was just too deep to completely remove and still leave some clear. Unless I showed you, you would never see it, and it made me feel like they followed my instructions. So, in the end I felt paint correction by a quality shop was better than an repaint.

BigTexTundra, neat idea and if I planned on keeping this truck forever I would definitely consider it. However, I will be trading this in for a Ford the first chance I get.
Maybe I am slow, but why bother if it's that small and most people would never see it. They most likely won't be pulling the windhield and back glass, so I wouldn't worry about that. I don't know if the comment about trading was sarcastic or not, but if you really intend trading it, quit stressing and send it down the road.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,599 Posts
Maybe I am slow, but why bother if it's that small and most people would never see it. They most likely won't be pulling the windhield and back glass, so I wouldn't worry about that. I don't know if the comment about trading was sarcastic or not, but if you really intend trading it, quit stressing and send it down the road.


Not that noticeable AFTER the work was done. Before there was a few spots and you could notice many of them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Maybe I am slow, but why bother if it's that small and most people would never see it. They most likely won't be pulling the windhield and back glass, so I wouldn't worry about that. I don't know if the comment about trading was sarcastic or not, but if you really intend trading it, quit stressing and send it down the road.
Got the work order on my desk and unless they are just writing this stuff for fun, removal of such parts is on their agenda.

I may likely trade it but something better needs to be there first worth a re-investment and if the new f150 grows a 10 speed and is proven a little more, I may very likely go that route. I like to keep my truck for 10 years and always hope that I find one that at 10 years I have no good reason to get another. But noticing this issue on day 2 of ownership has me angry with the dealer and brand. A replacement truck when it had 15 miles on it was the right thing for them to do. They had a twin there and could have done it but did not. Toyota is trying to make it right but I am still on the losing end of this and just trying to live it out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Factory paint - supposed to be harder due to the baking of the panel


I don't think your assumptions about paint hardness are really correct. I don't believe how the paint is cured affects the hardness. It affects the rate at which solvents (chemical that allow it to be applied as a liquid) evaporate from it once it is on the car in solid form.

In my opinion this all depends on the paint shop, but if you find the right shop it will be better than factory. Hardness isn't the big difference, it is prep. A human being can clean and prep a panel with more care, probably use higher quality paints with more layers of clear.

As you are witnessing for yourself, the weakness of a mass production paint job applied via robotic arms as the truck comes down the conveyor belt is more contaminants and sometimes uneven or imperfect coverage. After a couple years I noticed some imperfections on my crewmax. Dust under the paint in one or two spots and even some tiny spots down by where the wheel well transitions to the rocker panels where they missed it with the base and primer but went over it with the clear, so you have spots about the size of the tip of a pen where you see bare sheet metal under the clear.

I touched it up and moved on. Eventually those panels were hit and repainted. When the aftermarket shop did the repaint they did it with the panels on the truck without stripping everything off. I have no idea what technique they used but I didn't see any edges or anything. I have had multiple repaints, and none of the issues I have ever had stemmed from the fact that the car wasn't gutted prior to the re spray. They have been more due to wavy paint and imperfections caused by poor body work.

It is hard to say and to me it depends on how prevalent the dirt spots are. If they're all over and obvious, maybe worth it. If it's only a few spots, I might be inclined to let it go. A repaint could bring more quality control headaches to deal with. And you know dings, dents, scratches, and accidents will happen down the line anyway. Unless they are glaring and obvious enough that the truck looks really bad I might let it go until there is some more wear and tear on the paint to deal with.
Good thoughts here. The paint hardness is an assumption but heard it from the body guy. The difference from what I understand is that like you pointed out there are drying agents in aftermarket paint. In factory paint they can heat up the panels and from what I read are not just spraying the truck on an assembly line. Rather that they are doing it for all of the parts. To bake the paint and speed up the drying process. Which is better? Not sure but I painted a 67 mustang in my teens and remember my dad and I building a clean room that was immaculate and we still had to denib and buff quite a bit. Amateurs - yes, but suspect that the body shop will need to deal with these too. So then is there a difference between denibbing in its current state? There is but I still think it is possible.

But the reality of my truck may have had some dude smoking a cigarette through the paint room during the paint process. :( does mike sweers smoke btw?
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top