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Discussion Starter #1
This weekend I swapped out the factory 20" wheels with the bridgestones for a set of TRD Rock Warrior Wheels with 285/70-17 BFG KO2s.

I really like the way they look but noticed the traction is significantly worse than the factory Bridgestones. I'm surprised considering they should be on par according to the ratings on tirerack.com.

My factory tires had 2000 miles on them when I got the super charger installed and for the most part could hook from a rolling start and a mashed downshift. Sometimes they would spin and the nanny stuff would kick in.

The BFGs just spin, going 30, floor it, the traction light comes on, same thing at 40, 50, 60 - if it doesn't down shift its good but the second it down shifts the traction light comes on and there's no power.

So the subject, do these suckers need to break in or can I expect the dry traction to be such.

Thanks,
Michal
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i think you're expecting too much out of tires that are meant to provide traction on varied surfaces under normal driving conditions. what you're after is a low profile tire not unlike what they'd supply on a sports car.
 

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New tires (I'm assuming they're brand new) have mold release compound on them that needs to wear off. It's basically silicone or oil based that facilitates the removal of the tire from the...duh...mold they're made in. Until that happens, usually a few hundred miles or so, and also the little rubber nubs on the traction surfaces get worn off, the traction from new tires will be relatively poor on the street.

Also, to echo what Johnny said, there's no way you're going to get the same street traction from a more aggressive AT tire as you would from milder street oriented rubber. Not gonna happen even after initial wearing in. So add the torque of the supercharger and yeah, you're looking for something you'll never get from those KOs.
 

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New tires (I'm assuming they're brand new) have mold release compound on them that needs to wear off. It's basically silicone or oil based that facilitates the removal of the tire from the...duh...mold they're made in. Until that happens, usually a few hundred miles or so, and also the little rubber nubs on the traction surfaces get worn off, the traction from new tires will be relatively poor on the street.

Also, to echo what Johnny said, there's no way you're going to get the same street traction from a more aggressive AT tire as you would from milder street oriented rubber. Not gonna happen even after initial wearing in. So add the torque of the supercharger and yeah, you're looking for something you'll never get from those KOs.
This +1000. Give them some time and the silicon will wear off.

derp
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the responses. I need to check the PSI. Its whatever the guys at Discount Tire set it to. Its cold and wet here where I live now so its going to be a while before these tires see some nice dry road. I bet after a few hundred miles they'll be better. Too bad the tundra doesn't have a 4 auto mode because I'd love to leave the front wheels engaged all the time.
 

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I had a set of Bridgestone Revos on a Tacoma that had a break in period. I was able to break them loose without any effort but after a few weeks that stopped and they were great tires. Like somebody else said, there may be oils or mold compounds seeping out of them that need to wear off.
 
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