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Discussion Starter #1
To the mods: If this is not the appropriate sub-forum, please feel free to move.

I recently added an EasyGuard EC002-NS to my 2007 Tundra DC. It has worked so well, that when I bought my 2011 Sequoia two weeks ago, I immediately added it to that as well. Both vehicle installations were nearly identical.

When I posted my results at another forum, I was asked to do a write-up as I installed it on my Sequoia. As such, I am including a link to the write-up for anyone who feels inclined to do the same to their Tundras.

Once installed, you no longer need the factory key or key FOB. The passive key entry (PKE) remote will unlock the truck when you get about 5' away from it. Once inside, you press the push-button start, and it fires up (assuming you have the key within 5' of the truck). When you walk away, at about 10' it re-locks the vehicle. The key FOB stays in your pocket the entire time.

The remote start works from at least 75 yards. It'll fire up the engine and leave it running for 15 minutes if they key doesn't come within range. If you approach the truck while the engine is running, it'll unlock and you can enter, and the engine remains running.

Lastly, this model has a numeric touchpad that can be installed on the interior side of the windshield (I mounted mine in the bottom DS corner). This allows for completely key-less (or key FOB) entry, starting, and driving of the truck. Simply enter the correct code (through the glass) and the doors unlock, and the engine start button awakes. You can enter the vehicle, and push the button. The truck will continue running until the engine is turned off (with the button) and the door is opened/closed - at which point it re-locks and disables the start capability. I thought this sounded gimmicky until I was running late for a wedding and couldn't find my keys. I entered the code, started the truck, and drove 40 miles to the event... When it was done, I re-entered the code and drove home. I didn't have a key or key FOB the entire time.

So far, I have not found a single functional negative to the installation on either the Tundra or Sequoia... Well, except for the fact that the factory immobilizing tech is bypassed, thereby making theft a little less difficult (a spare key is hidden in the dash). But given where I live, and the gained practicality, I'm not concerned about that in any way.

Anyway, I have no affiliation with EasyGuard, or any other vendor for that matter. I'm just excited about bringing Toyota's flagship truck/SUV into the 21st century, that I thought I'd share my discovery.

FWIW, I bought the alarm from this Amazon page.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Thanks @thearborbarber.

Just a warning... This method will disable the factory immobilizer full-time. Having a hidden key placed inside the immobilizer antenna ring, even though it is hidden in the dash, is a security risk. Likewise, leaving a decapitated key in the ignition cylinder will disable the steering lock, and could potentially allow a thief to simply turn the key to start the vehicle (if the ignition cylinder harness isn't unplugged during install).

You will have to weigh whether the increased risk justifies the practicality gains of this inexpensive upgrade. Personally, I live in an extremely rural area (closest neighbor is more than a mile away), where everyone knows everyone else. But, that is a calculus everyone must consider for themselves.

There are more 'professional' installation methods which involve immobilizer bypass units which turn off the factory immobilizer only for the duration of the starting sequence. I am not familiar with these - so I cannot vouch for the cost, design, or availability.

Still, anyone considering this ought to be aware of these limitations and risks.

ETA: I have placed a cover page on the write-up PDF explaining the security risk.
 
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