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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Maybe you want to pull your differential or maybe you want to replace the wheel bearing hub assemblies. This tutorial will guide you through removing the complete shaft assemblies in your 2007+ Tundra.

Koyo Rear left bearing: #424600C010 $80.00
Koyo Rear right bearing: #424500C010 $80.00
(2) Toyota axle seals from dealer: #90310-A0004 $16.00
(2) Toyota retainers from dealer: #42423-34040 $52.82
Labor for dealer to R&R each shaft: $160.00


I accept no liability for any damage, accidents or injuries that may occur to you or your vehicle. Please proceed with caution.

Step 1: Place the vehicle on a level surface. Chock the front wheels so the vehicle doesn't roll. Jack up the rear of the vehicle and use the appropriate jackstands designed for the weight of the vehicle. It is a great idea to leave the jack firmly planted under the diff housing as a 3rd support for extra safety measures.



Step 2: Remove the wheel/tire combo. This will expose the rear brake assembly.



Step 3: Remove the (2) 17mm caliper bracket bolts located behind the caliper assembly. It is not necessary to remove the (2) 17mm caliper bolts that hold the calipers to the caliper brackets. Secure the caliper and bracket assembly on top of the axle tube, up near the leaf springs. You may want to use a bungee cord or zip ties to secure it well.



Step 4: Remove the rotor. A couple light taps from the back with a rubber mallet will loosen it from the hub and it will come right off.



Step 5: Remove the spring loaded clip that holds the metal brake line connector to the support bracket.



Step 6: Next you will need to remove the metal brake line connector from the support bracket. I chose to use an air cutoff wheel to cut a notch in the bracket so the line would slide out without having to disconnect the brake line from the caliper. If you choose to remove the line at the caliper, you will need to bleed the brake system upon reassembly.



Step 7: Remove the ABS connector. There is a gray outer support sleeve connector that will need to be removed before the plug will come unplugged. There are (2) fastening clips molded into the gray sleeve that have to be unclipped prior to accessing the black ABS sensor plug. Be careful during removal and study the connections well before proceeding.



Step 8: Next you will need to remove all of the parking brake hardware as shown in this picture. Make sure to note how everything comes apart so re-assembly will be easier. This will expose the parking brake cable end (shown below).





Step 9: Remove the 10mm bolt holding the parking brake cable to the rear of the hub assembly and pull the cable assembly out the back.



Step 10: Next, remove the (4) 17mm nuts that hold the axle and bearing assembly to the axle tube.



Step 11: Lastly, tap the rear of the hub assembly with a rubber mallet and it will release from the axle tube. Pull the complete axle assembly from the axle tube with caution. Make sure to remove and replace the rubber seal.



Step 12: Make sure to check inside the axle tubes for any damage, debris or abnormalities.



Step 13: Clean up the axle tube flange with steel wool to aid in reassembly as well as inspect the rubber axle seals. Replace if necessary.



If you have any questions, please feel free to shoot me a PM. Installation is the exact opposite. Be careful and take your time and the job will go smoothly.

Thanks,
Chris

:)
 

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Very nice. Do you have any part numbers of seals and the bearing assembles that someone would need to do this. This will be something I do in the future.

And how many miles do you have and was this just preventative maintenance or were you hearing the growl that comes from bad bearing.

Thanks for taking the time to write this up. Shops are quoting crazy high prices to this job.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Very nice. Do you have any part numbers of seals and the bearing assembles that someone would need to do this. This will be something I do in the future.

And how many miles do you have and was this just preventative maintenance or were you hearing the growl that comes from bad bearing.

Thanks for taking the time to write this up. Shops are quoting crazy high prices to this job.
I had the dealer hook up a chassis ear, went for a ride and found my right rear was roaring but I went ahead and replaced both for safe measure. It rides like a Boeing 737 now. My truck has 137,000 miles. I used Koyo bearing hubs, OEM Toyota axle seals and OEM Toyota retainers b

Koyo Rear left bearing: #424600C010 $80.00
Koyo Rear right bearing: #424500C010 $80.00
(2) Toyota axle seals from dealer: #90310-A0004 $16.00
(2) Toyota retainers from dealer: #42423-34040 $52.82
Labor for dealer to R&R each shaft: $160.00
 

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Thanks for posting, it looks pretty straight forward to remove the axle shaft. A Ford 9" comes apart in a similar way and when I disassembled my Ford 9" for new bearings, I had to use a slide hammer to pull the shafts out. You were able to get your shafts out without one I take it?

Do you have a pic of the axle and bearing assembly out of the housing? I can't believe how expensive this job is on this truck (even DIY) compared to other RWD vehicles I have owned. I am hoping my originals hold up for a while yet, but I am now hearing a faint "bearing like noise" at around 25-30 MPH that goes away at higher speeds. My truck has only about 83 K miles on it.
 

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Rear axle bearings

My 2007 crewmax has 75k and it has developed a rubbing noise in the right rear. I tore it apart and discovered that the parking brake drum lip is rubbing on the backing plate. It does it more while making a left hand turn. In my opinion, this could only be rubbing due to the axle bearing allowing movement of the axle. I guess I will be replacing both axle bearings. You would think that with Toyota knowing about this problem that they would cover the cost. They even put out a TSB on the issue. I hope that Toyota isn't going down hill with their quality and service. :confused:
 

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Thanks for the post, just a question about pulling the axle shafts out of the tube...are there any C clips to be removed from the differential, to allow the shaft to come out (as I had to remove on my Ford)? Thanks, Ron.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the post, just a question about pulling the axle shafts out of the tube...are there any C clips to be removed from the differential, to allow the shaft to come out (as I had to remove on my Ford)? Thanks, Ron.
No. Traditionally, axles that are held in place by the hub bolts do not utilize c-clips.
 

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Great write up. Real good pitchar work.
 

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question

Recently took my 07 CM on a vacation trip and started to hear an awful noise from the rear passenger side tire. After I got to my destination, I took my truck to the local toyota dealer and they said my rear axle seal was leaking. I just went over 130k miles. They told it would be a $1200 job after parts and labor, but hey im somewhat mechanically inclined so I thought I would try and do it myself. I'll find out soon enough if thats a good thing or bad thing. My question is about the koyo hubs. From the pictures ive found on that part, it looks like the bearing is already inside the seal of the hub. Does that just come right out once you get the part so it can be press fit onto the axle?? Also from your pictures it doesnt look like the hub on the axle comes off. I'm new to this type of job so any info will be helpful. Thanks
 

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Looking at aftermarket brands online, how would I know the wheel bearing assembly is the updated design and not the old?

for the rear right bearing assembly, there are two PNs: 42450-0C011 (cheaper) and 04002-4310C (more expensive). What's the difference?
04002-4310C is the new part number that for replacement of PN 04000-0010C and 42450-0C010.

I am sure the same could be said regarding the left rear bearing assembly.

rear left new part# 04002-4320C which replaces: 04000-0020C and 42460-0C010
and then the other part number the the rear left: 42460-0C011
 

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I went to the parts guy at the dealership and he helped me out by opening up a box. 04002-4310C and 04002-4320C are kits. Inside the the kits you'll find a new backplate, the respective wheel bearing hub assembly, seals, retainer, and new hardware.

Updated rear wheel bearing hub assembly PN:
42460-0C011 (left)
42450-0C011 (right)

Here's the tool you need if you tackle this yourself and have a nice size press. You can in the pictures how to use it.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Rear-Axle-S...0717048217&pt=Motors_Automotive_Tools&vxp=mtr
 

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I have $60 into both of my bearings from AM autoparts, and of course purchased the retaining clips from the dealer. Bearings have been on 6 months and I drive it like I stole it. Total with me pulling the axles was around $350. No problems at all yet, if they last two or three years I will be pleased.

I know it is old but I used some info here to ensure things went smooth. Thank you for the DIY, one thing I noticed was that the parking brake section of the rotor may rub after you re-install everything. I had to pull mine back apart and grind about a millimeter off of the back of each rotor. Also-the bearings CAN BE INSTALLED BACKWARD...but this is actually desirable because the speed sensors are behind the axle rather than in front of (less likely to be hit by rocks, *****, etc).
 

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Thanks for the DIY. Hopefully I can get some additional info given the age of this thread.

I recently removed and replaced a rear left bearing on my 2008 Toyota Tundra 4.7 Limited at 73k and noticed something loose where the shaft would eventually be re-inserted. Apparently this part is called an oil baffle or rear axle housing oil deflector (Part#42139 - 421080C010). There is a TSB on it as well (T-SB-0297-10). The only thing I can surmise is that I may have allowed the shaft to drop just enough and it kicked the baffle up and dislodged it. What I am curious about is if there might be any way for me to create a sort-of butterfly anchor style of sleeve on the end of a 30"+ rod with which to snap the damn thing back into place from the hub end or am I just destined to pull the drive shaft and differential cover to replace the damn thing properly and check for anything else while I'm there? If I need to open her up entirely, could anyone recommend a resource or guide to assist please. Appreciate in advance any constructive responses.


FYI, this is a partial summary of a new post that I created from earlier. Thanks
 

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Just followed this to replace both rear wheel bearings on my 2013 Tundra. Great thread...very well documented. I used the exact same parts, and the prices are even a bit cheaper now.

One note, as this was never clear to me when researching this issue of prematurely failing rear wheel bearings (my truck has 86000 miles) - it was suggested somewhere that a TSB was possibly issued in 2011 sometime acknowledging this issue and referencing a new style wheel bearing that carried a new Toyota part number. Having read that, I at first assumed that my 2013 would have been assembled using these newer bearing. When looking for parts to do this job I could only find the 'new' bearings with the new part number from Toyota...the cheapest I could find them for was $255 each plus shipping. The dilemma for me was whether or not I should buy these original Koyo replacements for significantly less money considering the fact that I might very well be replacing the newer/better bearings. Either way, though, seeing as if these only lasted 86000 miles (less if you take into account how long I've been dealing with the roar and vibration), I figured I didn't have much to lose. So I followed the original poster's lead and went with the Koyo's. After getting them pressed off yesterday I saw that the original bearings were in fact the old style...even had the exact Koyo part number stamped on them.
 

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Sorry...forgot to reply to this.

Don't have the special tool. We pulled the shafts and took them to the local drive shaft/gear shop. They had a tall enough press and enough homemade bits and pieces to R&R the bearings.

Yea...2013 and 86000 miles. The passenger side was completely toast, and the driver side wasn't far behind. I've pulled a fair amount, but loaded up I've never had more than 7k combined on the trailer and maybe 500 - 600lbs in the bed. Doesn't make much sense to me. It rides and sounds WAY better now, but with the rear fixed I'm pretty sure I can hear the front passenger bearing now. I'm sure they'll get replaced soon. <sigh>
 

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Hi,
Thanks for the post it was very helpful.
I replaced both my rear axle bearing with the parts that you suggested. I still have a grinding noise when I hit a bump or I make a left or right turn. Left wheel makes the noise with a right turn and right wheel with a left turn.
I also have the ABS light on now and it appears to have an issue with the speed sensors. I disconnected my battery to see if it was a reset issue but didn't appear to be the problem.
Would you have any suggests for either of this issues?
Thank
 
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