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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Used this video as a guide:

But I dropped my pan where the guy above just drains it. I suspected my fluid had never been changed and I was right, it didn't smelled burnt but it was the color of coffee. I didn't see the point in just draining the pan and leaving a 8yr old filter in there so I dropped the pan. Glad I did because there was another approx 1.5qts still in the pan that didn't drain out plus I wanted to clean and inspect the magnets for metal. My truck has 153k miles on it so I knew it would be better to get all the old fluid out I could. Ran into a couple bolt issues though, the two rear corner bolts on the pan were seized, both those bolts have threads that are exposed and I suspect water/dirt etc messed up the threads as I was removing them. One bolt head broke off the other I worked on for about 30mins with PB blaster until it finally came out. Once I dropped the pan I used vise grips to work the other broken bolt out the same way. For safety's sake I ran a tap to clean up the threads. The magnets had some sludge on them but no metal or chunks of anything. Once I cleaned up the pan and magnets I installed a new Toyota filter and o-ring and bolted the pan back on and put anti-seize on the threads. Then came the chore of getting the old nasty fluid out, as per the video I used clear tubing and made drain hose attached to the aux cooler line in front of the radiator and another attached to a long funnel to be able to add the new fluid from the engine bay.

I first put in 3qts of fresh fluid then started the truck and pumped 2qts out, the first 2qts that came out looked awful very dark brown. I kept doing this routine of adding 2qts and pumping 2qts out always leaving 1qt in the pan. I ended up pumping 8qts of old fluid out then put 4qts in the pan and called it good. I read somewhere the pan holds between 3.8 and 4.2qts so I hit right in the middle. Drove the truck about 60miles home and it did shift firmer, hold gears longer and ran about one tick cooler on the transmission temp guage. I've been dreading this job ever since buying my truck last summer because I suspected by the Carfax and dealer services print out it had never been done. Nice piece of mind knowing that old nasty fluid is out though. Once spring comes I plan on dumping the pan again and putting fresh fluid it, that should pretty much take care of any old fluid left in the system/transmission.

Didn't really need many tools, minus the broken bolts I think this is what I used.
24mm shallow socket
1/2 ratchet
10mm socket
3/8 ratchet
plenty of paper towels
brake cleaner
new filter
case of Toyota WS fluid
6ft (two pieces) of clear 5/8 tubing (really could have used 1/2 for filling the transmission but got 5/8 to work)
marked drain pan
 

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Nice work. Good idea to drop the pan after 150K miles too.

Did you do the whole temperature fluid level setting procedure? If you didn't, you might want to research it. Prior to TT, I had no idea that the expansion coefficient of transmission fluid was that huge. As I recall, the proper level set temp was like 104-112 degrees (research it). If you ran your engine very much, the fluid temp could be more than that.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
I did not do the fluid level setting procedure, I found online where the pan holds 4qts so I drained the pan again (forgot to mention this in the above post) and just a hair over 2qts came out. *This was AFTER I finished flushing thru the aux line* I knew it was supposed to have 4qts so I put two fresh quarts in along with the 2qts I had just drained out to have 4 total in the pan. The drive from my dads to my house is about 60miles/2hrs. Trans ran cooler, smoother, shifted firmer and held OD longer than before. My wife has driven the truck to work the last two days as well. If I had a problem I'd know it by now.

Not saying for anyone NOT to do the proper procedure I'm just saying I didn't.
 

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On a transmission with dipstick, I wouldn't dream of not checking the dipstick after a fluid change, even if I thought I had exchanged the exact same volume of fluid.

I can't think of a single good reason not to do the temperature/level check after a fluid change on a sealed transmission.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·

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Nice Job...This is on my list (minus dropping the pan) I've done the cooler line fluid exchange before on many vehicles. It's really a great method.
 
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