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Discussion Starter #1
I am looking at purchasing a 2017 jayco camper that is 40’ long and weights 8,300. I have 2014 Toyota Tundra CrewMax with electric brake hook up and would install a weight distribution height on the truck to connect to the trailer. I have successful pulled my old camper 35’ long weighing 6,800lbs. I just don’t want any problems with the new camper. I know the tundra claims 10,000-10,500 pounds towing but I don’t know how to equate the numbers from the new camper to the ones in the truck to see if this is even possible or falls within the ranges of the truck towing capacity. If anyone has any insight to help me with this would be awesome if you could share. The new camper would be towed 2 times a year about a hour to our land on the lake.

Thanks again!
 

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A 40 footer is too big for any half ton truck.
Agreed, with some questions. Duckman, which 40ft trailer is 8300lbs? Is the actual length 40’ and is that the unloaded weight?

I tow a “31 foot” trailer(about 34 feet with the tongue) that weighs about 6300 dry, and have zero issues. It’s usually 7000lbs or so loaded up for a trip, still dry as we don’t travel with full tanks. 40’ and 9000+lbs loaded? No thanks.

Also I don’t think there is any CrewMax Tundra anywhere rated more than 10,000 lbs. Post the trailer model number please or at least the dry weight/max weight, and with not knowing your towing capacity plus you “don’t know how to equate the numbers from the new camper to the ones in the truck” I’d say this trailer is a very serious no-go. No offense intended, just reality. I’m curious what the tongue weight of that thing is, too.
 

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I won't get into the weeds, I'll leave that to the trailer folks.
All I'll say is the Tundra is a beast for a half ton and honestly, in a class of it's own. But people regularly work their truck at or close to max rated capacity.
No machine should ever be run at Max capacity. And things like WDHs and air bags don't increase capacity.
80% is the goal.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Alright Guys here are the details I have. See the pictures for my truck and the weight of the trailer. I pulled my owners manual out and referenced my truck by the model and set up.
 

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Alright Guys here are the details I have. See the pictures for my truck and the weight of the trailer. I pulled my owners manual out and referenced my truck by the model and set up.
I was wrong. Thought it was 10,000 even, but it’s 10,100.:facepalm:

Jayco’s website shows the 38BHDS 8395lbs dry, 1130 hitch weight, gross vehicle weight of 10,950. Generally dry numbers are optimistic, so who knows. That leaves you with maybe 3-500 lbs of payload for all occupants, cargo in the bed, tongue weight for trailer cargo, etc. Then you’ll be near or at your tow limit, and it’s a a much bigger kite going down the road with a relatively light tow vehicle.

Twice a year slowly from land to lake? The truck will do it if you can, if everything goes right. Maybe. Safe? Marginal at best, but at least LA is relatively flat. I wouldn’t do it.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Well my plan is simple. Hook to it with no water or weight inside the camper. Pull to the lake then bring back all the weight to set up and leave it. It’s a great deal on the camper no excited about the length. I am write on the edge I agree but can’t see buying another truck for pulling twice a year. With that said 60 is as fast as I would go. 70 miles one way. I haven’t 100% decided yet but I am reviewing all info and will
Make a decision because on paper it will tow it.
 

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My Grand Design 297RSTS is 8140 lbs dry and 34' tongue to tail. Weight wise I think you are fine. I have towed mine over 6000 miles and Tundra handles it very well. I am just not sure about the length. I could have bought one model up which was 37' long and about 1000 lbs heavier but the length and weight were too much for me to think about it. For twice a year and 1 hour drive I think you are fine. I travel a lot more distance and would not be comfortable with it though.
 

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You have made your decision already but like most others, decided to ask anyway, hoping someone would make you feel better about it. Or, perhaps the wife thinks it is too much and you are hoping some one here will justify it to her. You are going to do what you want in the end but like others have already stated, no matter how you justify it, that is to much camper for your truck and it is exactly the reason why I now own a Ram 2500. I loved both of my Tundra's but neither would safely tow what I WANTED so I replaced my truck.
 

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No way I’d want to pull that with my tundra. It’s the length more than anything. You close to max weight. Which isn’t terrible but 40’ is a lot of camper for a light truck. Get a buddy with a 1 ton to pull it to the Lake for you. I’m guessing Toledo Bend, and they have some twisty pig trail roads around there.

I’m considering a 3/4 ton for my 32’ 5er that is 2000lbs lighter than yours....

Edit:
The Tundra will pull it I’m sure but it’s not going to be an easy fun experience. I’m around 9,000lbs loaded. On the interstate the truck is working pretty hard. I make up to 4hr runs mostly every month. So I’m on the road with mine a lot. A little different than your situation. Hills make a difference too. I pulled mine to lake Claiborne last month. The hills worked the truck pretty good compared to flat south LA. I was surprised it did fairly well though.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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I'll differ from the rest of the replies and say go for it. If you're comfortable. I'm getting the feeling you're not though, based on you asking the question.
I've always been pretty comfortable with a trailer behind me, even in less than optimal situations and setups. It's a no brainier, TO ME.
If the capacity is there I can't understand the disagreement. If it's length, simply remember that if turns are involved and set yourself up accordingly. Take both lanes if need be. Hell, semis do that now.
Other drivers factor into the equation but that's no different than every day driving.

I've edited this post after thinking about it more. Yes, it's wishy washy and open ended.
 

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Here's how it breaks down:

You need to know your payload number, which is listed on your tire and loading sticker on your drivers side door jamb. Now, I'm using numbers for a 2wd truck because that's what you highlighted in the owners manual pic you posted.

Take your GVWR (7,000 lbs) and subtract your vehicles payload capacity to get the curb weight of your truck. Lets use an optimistic 1,500 lbs of payload for this example. It's on YOU to verify and adjust the math with the ACTUAL number.

7,000-1,500 = 5,500 curb weight.

Take the GCVWR (16,000) and subtract the curb weight to get your vehicle's towing capacity.

16,000 - 5,500 = 10,500 Gross Towing Capacity.

NOW, it's important to remember that THIS method of calculating, while the most accurate, does not include any weight inside the vehicle from occupants, equipment, or cargo. So you need to adjust.

Take your towing capacity and subtract the weight of you as a driver, any passengers, cargo, camping equipment, trailer hitch weight, weight distribution setup weight, etc, etc to get your actual towing capacity for the exact trip you're taking.

Towing capacity (10,500) - You (250) - Wife (100) - Kid 1 (100) - Kid 2 (50) - Luggage for the four of you (200) - boogie boards, floats, and toys for the lake (100) - (drawbar and hitch) 50 - (weight distribution hitch) 100 = 9,550 Actual Real Life Towing Capacity. (Net Towing Capacity).

Now, you have to do all that again for your trucks Payload Capacity, to see if you can even hitch up.
Payload that you have to verify by the sticker (1,500) - equipment occupants and caro (950) = 550 lbs left before you even hitch up the trailer.

According to the spec's on your trailer, your tongue weight is 1,110 lbs DRY, which is 13.33% of your trailer weight. There's no way you're running at dry weight up to the lake, so lets assume you have another 500 lbs on the trailer, (very) optimistically. That means your realistic tongue weight (if the trailer is loaded evenly) is 1,176.66 lbs.

So, your trailer might weigh in at 8,825 and you'd have 725 lbs of towing capacity left.
BUT your payload is going to be way over what the truck is rated for, because your total is 626.66 lbs over.

Get where this is going? You have the classic modern day half ton problem, too much towing capacity, not enough payload. You need a 3/4 ton truck, and even then, you can run out of payload quickly if it's not spec'd right.

You're going to be overloaded, and it's a payload problem, not a tow capacity problem, although, it very well could be both.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
To everyone that has posted to cover a few things. I have not 100% made up my mind as of yet. Just a really good deal on the camper. Yes I don’t like the 40’ aspect of the camper. As for the weight after researching my truck, it appears that it will pull it not easily but it can be done.

The only way I would pull it to my camp is if it was not loaded at all. Meaning I would make a separate trip with all supply’s in it for staying. I pulled my other camper back home last night and unloaded all the weight. The only thing I would bring with me is the caulks and leveling materials to set it up.

Then I would return for the weekend with all the stuff needed to stay for a while. Before I towed it back would unload all the weight and bring it home. Then go back and get the weight. Just wanting everyone’s point of view before I purchased the camper. I don’t want to make a mistake.

Current camper is 35’ long with dry weight of 6,800 pounds. If I purchased the new one would be 40’ long with a dry weight of 8,300 pounds. So all in all another 1500 pounds of dry weight plus 5-6’ longer. All tanks and excess weight empty and removed.
 

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To everyone that has posted to cover a few things. I have not 100% made up my mind as of yet. Just a really good deal on the camper. Yes I don’t like the 40’ aspect of the camper. As for the weight after researching my truck, it appears that it will pull it not easily but it can be done.

The only way I would pull it to my camp is if it was not loaded at all. Meaning I would make a separate trip with all supply’s in it for staying. I pulled my other camper back home last night and unloaded all the weight. The only thing I would bring with me is the caulks and leveling materials to set it up.

Then I would return for the weekend with all the stuff needed to stay for a while. Before I towed it back would unload all the weight and bring it home. Then go back and get the weight. Just wanting everyone’s point of view before I purchased the camper. I don’t want to make a mistake.

Current camper is 35’ long with dry weight of 6,800 pounds. If I purchased the new one would be 40’ long with a dry weight of 8,300 pounds. So all in all another 1500 pounds of dry weight plus 5-6’ longer. All tanks and excess weight empty and removed.
You don't need opinions or peoples' thoughts on it. You need the numbers.

Run the numbers. I gave you all the tools you need to know if you can pull the camper in any scenario.
 

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riccnick, good post.

Just wondering, has it been established that the original poster's Tundra is ABSOLUTELY, BONE STOCK without any modifications? If not, then he needs to recalculate his GVWR, GCVWR, Payload Capacity, Tongue Weight Capacity and Towing Capacity. If he has only been calculating his Towing Capacity and not ALL the other proper calculations God Bless him. At some point he may need divine intervention.

FYI, according to the 2014 Tundra Product info published by Toyota, the empty trailer tongue weight of the trailer alone exceeds the max tongue weight for his Tundra from the get-go. Your 1176 lb adjusted tongue weight (with hitch etc) is even further over his Max Tongue Weight. So at the very least he has a tongue weight problem (even WITH a WD hitch).

An idiot driver or animal on the same road as this Tundra and Trailer may not have a good outcome. I have seen enough trailer accidents first hand to know that sort of risk is taken too lightly by some people.
BTW, idiot drivers and animals are everywhere from 1 mile to 70 miles to 700 miles from one's home and everywhere in between. Been there, seen it, had to deal with it when towing. Towing distance may do little to eliminate risk from these dangers in the long run unless there are never animals or other drivers on the roads you use.

BTW, another 5-6 feet of trailer length adds more than a couple of square feet of surface area for wind to blow against. That along with another 3/4 ton of additional trailer weight can easily change the towing characteristics more than the OP might realize or be willing to admit.

No matter how you crunch the numbers the answer to the OP's original question (Can I tow this set up safely???) is still NO in my book.
 
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