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The 5er comment was supposed to be a funny retort to your "we all shouldn't tow more than a 2500# ultralite" comment you closed with...

These conversations can go on forever. And after this cycle of comments everyone will forget and believe whatever they want.

Overloading the truck in ANY way is not acceptable, ever. And simply because there is no law governing it is not a standard to accept. Making the smarter choice for yourself before the government does step in is what it is about.

No offense meant dude...
I was in a mood. I wasn't able to play basketball at lunch and burn off some steam. I guess I brought the 5er comment on myself with the Ultralite thing.

"Overloaded" in the Tundra is funny to me. Toyota is the only manufacturer to abide by the J2807 towing standards. I feel that if they didn't go with strict standards and posted weights 10% higher then with the increased buffer nobody would be asking these questions for many of the TTs. If I'm over my 1440 payload by 100 lbs I'm not going to lose any sleep over it.

I personally had 1200 lbs of sand in my truck a few weeks ago as well as two grown male passengers and I couldn't tell it was there. I think I bumped a bump stop though going slowly over a bump so I would have liked to have air bags and will install them before loading up like that again.

Not directed at you, but just referring back to my post, here is a good post about WDHs.

http://www.tundratalk.net/forums/tundra-towing-hauling/324930-weight-distributing-hitches-weights-explained-ish.html
 

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it is in Toyota's best interest to publish the absolute highest payload and towing numbers possible since that directly translates into sales.
I can only kind of agree with you, there. Liability and warranty work are also huge factors that often lower numbers for all manufacturers. The horsepower game, while not the same as the towing game, is a prime example. Every couple of years, manufactures bump up the HP and TQ ratings for a given motor to try and out gun the competitors, all the while using the same motor and parts. Tuning is often the only change. Then there are very minor tweaks to accessories that improve performance, and more major tweaks (like adding direct injection). For a specific example, an LB7 duramax made 520 lb ft of torque and 300 HP when it debuted. With some after market tuning only, it was capable of consistently and reliably making 380 HP and 650 lb feet of torque. Heavy tuning, like stacking chips, pushed it over 400 HP and 700 lb feet. They survived just fine in the right hands, but the more stupid you got with the stupid pedal, the more likely it was to have an issue. Had they released the LB7 with 800 lb feet of torque, it would have blown everybody out of the water! But warranty work and reliability would have been beyond acceptable limits (think big tune + bad injectors) - not necessarily to the motor, but to the rest of the truck as well. Successive iterations of the same motor have made more and more HP and Torque by making some small and some large changes as noted above. The game is about remaining competitive, which explains the dramatic leap from Gen1 to Gen2 tundras.

In my opinion, Toyota's reputation is synonymous with reliability and consistency. So that is what is in their best interest to provide to the end consumer. In 8 years of production and one model change, the drivetrain specs have remained identical (notice I'm not including Gen1's). Payload and towing have had some very minor tweaks as spring packs and vehicle weight have changed, but have remained consistent. Toyota needed to make big waves in the already huge truck market in order to get noticed. So they over built the Tundra and haven't had to change a thing while other MFG's have to constantly make revisions. Like GM no longer using the 10 bolt rear end as standard 1/2 garb; the 14 bolt semi-floater is standard with a V8 and the 10 bolt only comes in V6 becomes it couldn't hack it anymore. Though the 10 bolt did have a prolific run. Not saying the tundra was perfectly engineered (think, AIP, bed bounce, dictator-esque VSC..) but it was certainly very well engineered to do what it was designed to do.

1000# tongue weight, Payload on a CM is 1200 (1200-1000=200). you have 200# of payload left...Anybody in the truck?? Any gear in the truck??
Unfortunately, tongue weight does not translate directly to payload when using a weight distributing hitch. An ideal setup with WD hitch is 1/3 - 1/3 - 1/3 for TT axles, truck rear axle, truck front axle, respectively. Rarely does the distribution become ideal, but set up properly, you are redistributing 1/3 of the weight [and here is where I find myself using a term improperly - by 'weight' I mean 'force' or 'load'. The weight remains the same, regardless as we can't change gravity; but the 'load' is distributed...] back to the trailer [so the 'load' placed on the tow vehicle is lessened]. So 1000# tongue weight = 666 lb payload (ideally), leaving 534 lbs for people and payload.

So the 'should' in towing isn't nearly as dire as the poorly figured numbers appear. Lucky53 has a valid point - where do we draw the line? Why does every 'can I tow it' thread end in, 'no you shouldn't or you are an idiot' (though the poor lady that asked about towing her 14k lb horse trailer that she got swindled in to buying needed to hear that she shouldn't - for everybody's sake). Was that J2807 towing standard just a ruse created by other MFG's that Toyota spun on domestics? Is it worthless? What are the proper rule's of thumb? Why should we use rule's of thumb in place of real ratings? Of course, a rule system based on conjecture isn't comprised of rules at all.

2010 and many others also speak wisdom - don't be an idiot and think you can tow anything! But that doesn't mean you can't tow a single thing, either.

The Tundra will tow just about anything but the Tundra should tow within or near the ratings published by Toyota. I have no issues with people exceeding limits by small amounts...
This I agree with completely. Apparently, the problem is figuring out the CORRECT specifics of what we are towing. I believe most people are ill advised or just too lazy to do the math themselves. And by math I don't mean Tongue Weight + Passengers + gear = Payload as that is not a true equation.
 

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The best way? Go take it on a CAT scale, spend the $14 to weigh it properly 3 times and you will have your exact numbers. You can guess all you want, until the camper is loaded, your truck and family are loaded and the numbers printed out all you have are guesses. As a side benefit you will see if your WDH is setup correctly and can make any tweaks to it.

Me - 6600# camper, 850# TW - all measured. After me, wife, three young boys, my 75#dog and minimal gear is loaded in the truck my payload is tapped out. Again, all measured.

The hard part when shopping is that the camper is empty and your truck is probably empty so weighing it isnt as much help. Still for the small amount it costs it gives you hard numbers to look at and you'll know if you have room to add in 500 or 1000# of gear and still be in spec.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
I just wanted to update this thread. We decided to place the purchase of such a long trailer, and any trailer on hold for a while. I have done some small flatbed trailer towing recently, but it has been 10+ years since I have pulled a larger travel trailer. So we have decided to borrow a friends fifth wheel trailer and his truck for the summer. It is kind of a bummer because he drives a 2003 Chevy and I have to leave him my Tundra when we take it, but I am getting good towing experience. It is also allowing my wife the opportunity to see if she really enjoys camping as well as give us the opportunity to check out camping accommodations (for length of trailer) and route our trips (with gas stations).

I really appreciate everyone's input. These posts helped guide our decision and gave me the leverage I needed to convince my wife that maybe we don't need the biggest trailer out there. :eek:)

Thanks again!
 

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I have a 28ft trailer and it will have it's maidned voyage with my Crewmax SR5 4x4 this week.

Dry weight is 4250, loaded, a little under 6K. We don't pack a ton of stuff.

I have towed it for years with an F350 longbed and never even knew it was back there.

My only concern with the Tundra was if it were able to handle the trailer's length. But after talking with other owners it will be fine. My brother tows his 30ft Airstream with his 2010 Tundra and it does fine.
 

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I have a 28ft trailer and it will have it's maidned voyage with my Crewmax SR5 4x4 this week.

Dry weight is 4250, loaded, a little under 6K. We don't pack a ton of stuff.

I have towed it for years with an F350 longbed and never even knew it was back there.

My only concern with the Tundra was if it were able to handle the trailer's length. But after talking with other owners it will be fine. My brother tows his 30ft Airstream with his 2010 Tundra and it does fine.
My CM does great with my 28' Airstream. You'll be fine.
 

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I'm sure it will be fine. When we first got the trailer I didn't have the F350 and towed it withe my wife's Sequoia. The wheel base on that was short and I was white knuckling it going through the Cochella, Ca valley. The winds there can be nasty.
 

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Here's a thought: If it's too big for you to back it accurately and smoothly, then it's too big for you to pull. Or, if you can't parallel park your truck, you shouldn't try towing with it. Rent a you-howl for a weekend, practice on some empty parking lot and enjoy the experience.
 
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