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Hello,

I'm looking for some input on buying a new Tundra.

We have owned a 2010 SR5 5.7 V8 from new, it's been an awesome reliable work horse for my highline car dealer business and the wife's horse farm. Now with 250k miles and still running strong (not quite as pretty as it used to be), it's time to retire it to a quieter life as a local farm vehicle only

My question is do I replace it with a 2021 5.7 V8 or a 2022 Turbo V6 or even the Highbred. Towing an enclosed 20' car trailer about 10k miles a year for my business is a big part of this equation (7500lbs loaded). The 2010 has at least 50k miles towing over the years and has been very reliable, although the gas mileage leaves something to be desired. So, do I stick with the very reliable 2021 5.7 V8 with the 38-gallon gas tank option or the 2022 newer but still to be proven power plants regarding long-term reliability? I'll probably keep this truck for another 10 years.

TIA,

Joseph
 

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Based on what you wrote it sounds like you want a new truck, you don't need a new truck. But it is decision time regarding a 21 model. I have owned a first year 2000 Tundra for 10 years and had no issues. I have owned a a 2004 Sienna AWD and had many issues with electric doors-hinges, and drivers seat cracked leather at 34,000 miles. Toyota took care of the issues. In theory I agree with Danny3737 but I have wound up with two first year Toyota's and I would not be afraid of a new Toyota truck. They know they have a reputation to up hold.

So to me you only have one decision to make, do you want a 21 and a proven V-8? I recommend adding the Magnusion supercharger with the HP tune. You will not only bump the power to 550 hp and 550 torque the transmission is tuned and it is much more enjoyable to drive. You will also gain around five MPG. So comparable in power to a 22 IMax. MPGs are not known for the iMax yet but I don't think it will be over 24 and I frequently see 22-24 at 72 mph on flat ground.

So if you choose not to buy a 21 I would keep driving old reliable until you can get the 22 iMax of your choice. I will say I am not a fan of V-6s but the hybrid version might convince me. As vehicles become more complicated the hybrid is a good option if you live out in the contry and cold where a battery vehicle would be a poor option. Other wise I would be looking at a single rear wheel one ton diesel. Listening to the lead designer Mike Swears talk about the new Tundra is pretty convincing to me.
 

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310z makes a solid point of Toyota's success with first year models, is anyone avoiding 2007 because it was a first year disaster? I don't think that should be a big part of your decision personally but I can see a few people that it would be, to each his own. Depending on your timeframe it could come down to which model is available. I'm guessing there will be quite a few people trying to get the 2021's before they're gone. That, combined with the shortage of vehicles right now could make for a problem if one absolutely needed a truck.
 

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The "never buy a 1st year..." is a valid rule for just about every brand except Toyota, but the "never buy a vehicle with a forced induction engine and expect it to last as long as a normally aspirated engine" is a valid quote that applies to all brands, including Toyota.

If I was in the OP's position, I would shop for a slightly used older 2nd gen Tundra with a 5.7L
 

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I would stay away from the new motor electronics stuff. I wish they squeezed more mpg out of the 5.7 but it’s still a great block
 
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Hello,

I'm looking for some input on buying a new Tundra.

We have owned a 2010 SR5 5.7 V8 from new, it's been an awesome reliable work horse for my highline car dealer business and the wife's horse farm. Now with 250k miles and still running strong (not quite as pretty as it used to be), it's time to retire it to a quieter life as a local farm vehicle only

My question is do I replace it with a 2021 5.7 V8 or a 2022 Turbo V6 or even the Highbred. Towing an enclosed 20' car trailer about 10k miles a year for my business is a big part of this equation (7500lbs loaded). The 2010 has at least 50k miles towing over the years and has been very reliable, although the gas mileage leaves something to be desired. So, do I stick with the very reliable 2021 5.7 V8 with the 38-gallon gas tank option or the 2022 newer but still to be proven power plants regarding long-term reliability? I'll probably keep this truck for another 10 years.

TIA,

Joseph
Stick with what you like and can depend on. I finally sold my 2000 tundra and bought 2021 and I love it. Also availability. Where I live, I haven’t seen a 2022. Dealer said hard to get. Love my 2021. Just my opinion. Best of luck!
 

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Hello,

I'm looking for some input on buying a new Tundra.

We have owned a 2010 SR5 5.7 V8 from new, it's been an awesome reliable work horse for my highline car dealer business and the wife's horse farm. Now with 250k miles and still running strong (not quite as pretty as it used to be), it's time to retire it to a quieter life as a local farm vehicle only

My question is do I replace it with a 2021 5.7 V8 or a 2022 Turbo V6 or even the Highbred. Towing an enclosed 20' car trailer about 10k miles a year for my business is a big part of this equation (7500lbs loaded). The 2010 has at least 50k miles towing over the years and has been very reliable, although the gas mileage leaves something to be desired. So, do I stick with the very reliable 2021 5.7 V8 with the 38-gallon gas tank option or the 2022 newer but still to be proven power plants regarding long-term reliability? I'll probably keep this truck for another 10 years.

TIA,

Joseph
I decided to stick with 2018 when I read the engineers said regardless which drivetrain you choose, that towing mileage will be nearly identical to the 5.7. That’s all I needed to know. That, on top of no Limited in cement, I’m sticking with what I have.
 

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I had an 07 Tundra and they had an air injection pump issue that popped up around year 2-3 for high mileage drivers and it was a nearly $2000 repair. The truck was very reliable, but it was not without a couple issues, and all these things are very expensive. Eventually Toyota covered it under warranty, but for those of us who experienced it first, there was a big money outlay that later was covered by warranty.

I would tend towards Danny3737 opinion that I avoid first or even second year automobiles if I can. Toyota may be better than others for avoiding issues, but things come up that are not anticipated and don't get caught in pre-release testing, and everything is expensive.

Also, I think there are going to be a glut of 21's that are going to hit the market in the next couple months and I think there might be some good deals as they try to clear these all out before the 22's arrive, so I am guessing that there may be some great deals on 21's coming up. If that proves to be true, then it will be hard to resist getting a 21.

I am also not a huge fan of the Turbo's. They seem unnecessary and just add complexity and expense.

Bottom line, I think the 21 will be the better quality of the two and probably less expensive, but I think you will be happy either way.
 

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Based on what you wrote it sounds like you want a new truck, you don't need a new truck. But it is decision time regarding a 21 model. I have owned a first year 2000 Tundra for 10 years and had no issues. I have owned a a 2004 Sienna AWD and had many issues with electric doors-hinges, and drivers seat cracked leather at 34,000 miles. Toyota took care of the issues. In theory I agree with Danny3737 but I have wound up with two first year Toyota's and I would not be afraid of a new Toyota truck. They know they have a reputation to up hold.

So to me you only have one decision to make, do you want a 21 and a proven V-8? I recommend adding the Magnusion supercharger with the HP tune. You will not only bump the power to 550 hp and 550 torque the transmission is tuned and it is much more enjoyable to drive. You will also gain around five MPG. So comparable in power to a 22 IMax. MPGs are not known for the iMax yet but I don't think it will be over 24 and I frequently see 22-24 at 72 mph on flat ground.

So if you choose not to buy a 21 I would keep driving old reliable until you can get the 22 iMax of your choice. I will say I am not a fan of V-6s but the hybrid version might convince me. As vehicles become more complicated the hybrid is a good option if you live out in the contry and cold where a battery vehicle would be a poor option. Other wise I would be looking at a single rear wheel one ton diesel. Listening to the lead designer Mike Swears talk about the new Tundra is pretty convincing to me.
Hey there my name is Danny I've got a 19 SR 5-T RD off road edition I've been reading up on the magnificent supercharger Somewhat and I and I am convinced now that I would like to get 1 get 1 any recommendations on sourcing as everywhere I check the around 7 grand with everything included And if you could if there's any bugs or little tricks I need to do while using this or installing it I would appreciate if you could help me out thank you
 

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I had an 07 Tundra and they had an air injection pump issue that popped up around year 2-3 for high mileage drivers and it was a nearly $2000 repair. The truck was very reliable, but it was not without a couple issues, and all these things are very expensive. Eventually Toyota covered it under warranty, but for those of us who experienced it first, there was a big money outlay that later was covered by warranty.

I would tend towards Danny3737 opinion that I avoid first or even second year automobiles if I can. Toyota may be better than others for avoiding issues, but things come up that are not anticipated and don't get caught in pre-release testing, and everything is expensive.

Also, I think there are going to be a glut of 21's that are going to hit the market in the next couple months and I think there might be some good deals as they try to clear these all out before the 22's arrive, so I am guessing that there may be some great deals on 21's coming up. If that proves to be true, then it will be hard to resist getting a 21.

I am also not a huge fan of the Turbo's. They seem unnecessary and just add complexity and expense.

Bottom line, I think the 21 will be the better quality of the two and probably less expensive, but I think you will be happy either way.
I have a 2012 that developed the AIP issue. Toyota would not cover the repair. In fact my comment to the office of the President of Toyota NA was that they were becoming GM like in not backing their poor designs. The estimate for repair was about $3000 but I found a bypass that I installed that cost less than $200. That was 4 years ago and I have had zero issues since. If you have that problem I would look for other options that remove the AIP completely.
 

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Your biggest problem is availability. The two dealers in my area have no Tundra. When i look at Minneapolis i can find a few. I dont think you will see a 2022 until this summer at best.
 

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Hey there my name is Danny I've got a 19 SR 5-T RD off road edition I've been reading up on the magnificent supercharger Somewhat and I and I am convinced now that I would like to get 1 get 1 any recommendations on sourcing as everywhere I check the around 7 grand with everything included And if you could if there's any bugs or little tricks I need to do while using this or installing it I would appreciate if you could help me out thank you
I sent you a private message..
 

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I NEVER buy the first year of a new platform. It usually takes a manf a couple of years to shake things out, especially when you have a new power train. I know the motor is not new, but it has never been used in a Tundra
Well 5 of the first year tundras have surpassed a million miles. I think it’ll be ok
 

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Hello,

I'm looking for some input on buying a new Tundra.

We have owned a 2010 SR5 5.7 V8 from new, it's been an awesome reliable work horse for my highline car dealer business and the wife's horse farm. Now with 250k miles and still running strong (not quite as pretty as it used to be), it's time to retire it to a quieter life as a local farm vehicle only

My question is do I replace it with a 2021 5.7 V8 or a 2022 Turbo V6 or even the Highbred. Towing an enclosed 20' car trailer about 10k miles a year for my business is a big part of this equation (7500lbs loaded). The 2010 has at least 50k miles towing over the years and has been very reliable, although the gas mileage leaves something to be desired. So, do I stick with the very reliable 2021 5.7 V8 with the 38-gallon gas tank option or the 2022 newer but still to be proven power plants regarding long-term reliability? I'll probably keep this truck for another 10 years.

TIA,

Joseph
The 38 gallon tank is a scam. It may hold 38 gallons, but when guage reads nearly empty, I can only add 31 or 32 gallons. Have read it has to do with fuel pickup tube?!?
I bought the time tested 2021 SR5. I have put 10k on it since new, hooked to my Airstream right now. Like it so far.
 

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The 38 gallon tank is a scam. It may hold 38 gallons, but when guage reads nearly empty, I can only add 31 or 32 gallons. Have read it has to do with fuel pickup tube?!?
I bought the time tested 2021 SR5. I have put 10k on it since new, hooked to my Airstream right now. Like it so far.
It’s not a scam it’s the way all Toyotas read.
 

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For the price of the 22 Tundie, pretty much entering Super Duty/HD Duty territory... Plus, more options too.
 
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