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Several of the highways I regularly drive on in the Denver area are concrete with spacing such that the ride sucks at 60-75 mph. Like riding a bucking horse. Smoother at 55 and 80, but with 65 mph speed limit, neither of those is a good speed to travel. So, what suspension mods could help without sacrificing towing safety and off-road capability? I do more towing than off-roading. I was wondering if Air bags could be adjusted while driving to just change the dynamic enough to stop the bucking. Thoughts?


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Add some weight as far back toward the tailgate as you can and play with the rear tire pressure to find a pressure it likes.
 

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I realize my fix isn't for everyone, but found a camper shell helped my issue.
Tundra Camper R:R-1.jpg
 

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Several of the highways I regularly drive on in the Denver area are concrete with spacing such that the ride sucks at 60-75 mph. Like riding a bucking horse. Smoother at 55 and 80, but with 65 mph speed limit, neither of those is a good speed to travel. So, what suspension mods could help without sacrificing towing safety and off-road capability? I do more towing than off-roading. I was wondering if Air bags could be adjusted while driving to just change the dynamic enough to stop the bucking. Thoughts?


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I have a 16’ dbl cab with a 7” BDS lift with 37” MTs. I was smoking the Fox rear shocks, partly because they were horrible and partly because C-470 concrete is brutal, especially on an empty bed. Installed Bilsteins and its alittle better but the harmonics are still there. In the bed I have a topper with a full RhinoRack complete with HiLift/ axe/shovel, awning/ full sized spare and recovery gear in the bed, so probably 500#+. I dont get down to the city much, so its an issue I just deal with as I live in the mtns. You can check out the rig at: www.grizguides.com/sponsors
 

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I have had 4 Tundra's, and the best for highway hop is the stock black shocks. The bilstiens tend to be a little stiffer ride. But the best solution is to add a couple hundred pounds of something like sandbags, topper, etc back there.

If you are having this more with a big trailer attached, then sometimes adjusting the equalizing bars either tighter or looser can make a big difference, and sometimes going to stiffer bars will help. But adding shocks to the trailer axles is the real solution!
 

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Same here on my 2015 DC 5.7L. Southern California concrete freeway expansion joints (only in certain areas, like the main freeway through my city!) set up a wicked vertical vibration in the rear of the bed that shakes the whole vehicle. I can watch the rear corner of the bed rapidly vibrate up and down at least an inch. I believe that it is primarily caused by the non-boxed rear frame under the bed being too flexible for the unloaded bed.

As you point out, it is a harmonic, tied to a particular frequency of vibration which is a function of the distance between expansion joints and their height. For me, it manifests at all freeway speeds between ~65-80mph. Slower, it isn't fast enough to resonate. Faster, and the bump frequency between the expansion joints cancels out the frame response.

I'm running 2.5" rear Icon resis w/ the CDCV and I have tried all the settings. Nothing helps. I have a beast of a Hellwig rear sway bar (#7692, 1 1/8" dia) and it too doesn't change anything. I have tried all different rear tire pressures (Michelin Defender LTX LT295/65R-18 123Q 10-ply).

Absent significant frame reinforcing, and coincident with others' replies here, I have concluded that only weighing down the bed will cure it. It's really the only thing I seriously dislike about this truck.
 
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