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If it was me I'd just buy some OEM pads. Should only take an hour or two to install. I've never felt the need for "better" pads on any of my vehicles. I do generally replace rotors at the same time, but usually they are shot--if yours are in good shape I'd leave them alone.
 

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Your brakes are biased to the front not back - front should always be first.
Not true any more. Or at least not all the time. My VW (well, the model not just mine) is notorious for eating rear brake pads before fronts, typically at a rate of 2x the fronts. In order to help front end dive on braking, rear brakes are often activated first--on the VW anyhow it's called Electronic Brake Distribution, or EBD. On a truck I'd expect similar, since during towing the rear brakes are capable of doing much more work. The ABS controller deals with lockup issues but I'm guessing they can play with bias just the same with the controller, without having to wait for a tire to lock up.
 
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What size are the rear calipers compared to the front on your VW? :)
Looks like 280mm (11inch) front and 232mm (9inch) rear for rotor size. Vented front/solid rear.
 

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Ding ding. It can bias on the fly, I get that. You lock the rears up more than the front and you'll have zero turning ability and will under steer straight into the back of a car.


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Huh?

I can tell you, fronts lock up more often on mine. Only times I've gotten it to lock up is in snow, but it certainly feels like a front tire lockup. A few times I've had the ABS kick in when the front tire drops off pavement into the driveway, and I know that's a front wheel ABS incident.
 

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Because the brake system is proportioned to favor the front.
Then why do the rear brakes wear faster on my car? Rear pads to metal at 168k, but the fronts had at least half the material left at 175k if not more.

If the system is not proportioned to the front then at least the rears engage first.
 
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Yes, 50% at 175k, while rears were toast. I bought the car with just 25 miles on it, no prior owners at all. I'm the only driver of the car too.

Only reason why I checked front pads was because one pad separated from the backing plate. Otherwise I would still be using, I think.
 

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Sorry for the delay; WiFi was lousy at our campground.

Not sure what you think I gain by lying. But it is what it is. If it is any consolation, I have no expectation of getting such brake life out of my Tundra: have to ride the brakes all the time in this thing. Just yesterday I did a few miles of suburban driving driving, and when I got to the parking garage, I put my hands near the rotors, front and rear. Both front and rear were quite warm, if not hot--no way I was touching them! I'm used to being able to touch the rotors on my car when I get to work or home.

You see, I coast to stop most of the time. Manual transmission, so I can downshift once or twice. Rural commute. 45 miles to get to work, 45 miles home. I recently altered my drive, so I might make four stops on the way--before it was less, and a couple miles longer. One time I estimated my car spent over 90% of its time on the highway. It's less now, but it's still lots of rural driving. The car has also seen some plenty of highway trips. If it's any indication, I'm getting more than 10% over the pre-'08 high mpg estimate for my car -- it's being driven to minimize cost.

Anyhow, perhaps I'm in for a rude shock on this Tundra. I've noticed I've had to the brakes a ton more. Not sure why, probably because it's getting more use not on my well-known commute where I know where to let off and coast.
 
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I burp the motor on downshifting. I probably do less damage to the clutch than when my wife drives her car--she manages to make it rev up when upshifting. I always cringe when I ride with her, but when she got rid of her Civic at 173k it still had the original clutch. I also don't downshift through all the gears, I usually will drop from 4th or 4th down to 3rd, only occasionally coasting in 2nd. As pointed out, brakes are relatively cheap & easy to replace. But the mpg boost is pretty real too.

My VW has has good ole VW engineering. Only VW could design a flywheel that could fail... Mine gave indication of failure, and I stuck around the shop when the clutch was replaced. All parts looked mint, not even half worn, after 249kmiles. But I had made the decision to get a stronger clutch, in anticipation of future mods (which came much sooner than planned, when the turbo failed at 251k, ouch), otherwise the mechanic would have just replaced the flywheel and put it back together--I could have gone that route, but it seemed wiser to replace everything, since labor was half the cost of the job.

I'm going to have to try forcing the Tundra to downshift on stopping again, for said coasting trick. When I first bought it, I was doing that, but was getting horrible mpg's, IMO. First three tanks were 16.8 on my highway commute, that was doing 65mph on the highway max and not going over 2k, etc. I put a few tanks through it, to make sure no problems, then started driving it just around town, where it then did 18.9 and a couple of 20.7's. Huh? Warm weather, summer gas, beats me. Maybe it really hates cold weather, I dunno.
 
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