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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi I had my pads replaced 6 months ago approx. 2000 miles I don't use the truck much. They replacement the pads with Wagner and don't seem to stop as well as the original Toyota pads. I called the service station and complained and got no response from the so I am looking to upgrade the rotors and pads with Power Stop (brand). The kit costs 385.00 front/rear drilled and slotted rotors with the ceramic pad kit all and free shipping. Toyota's price was 575.00 plus tax. Check this out...........What do you think?

PowerStop Complete Brake Kit, Power Stop Brake Rotors and Pads, Powerstop Brake Kit

Thanks
 

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I never cared for Powerstop and I Actually prefer EBC pads when it comes to upgrades. Remember, the proportioning system is only going to send approx 30-35% of the stopping power to the rear so focusing on the rear is not as important as good pads and rotors in the front, IMO.

Unless you are towing 10,000lbs or road racing, Wagner rotors and pads should have been sufficient. I've never had any problems with Wagner.
 

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If it was me I'd just buy some OEM pads. Should only take an hour or two to install. I've never felt the need for "better" pads on any of my vehicles. I do generally replace rotors at the same time, but usually they are shot--if yours are in good shape I'd leave them alone.
 

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I've noticed I see more people on truck forums replacing rotors lately. I've always been able to have them turned one time at fairly high mileage, then they last me another 100,000 miles or so. I guess I don't drive as aggressively as most. But, I DO want me trucks to stop!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
I never cared for Powerstop and I Actually prefer EBC pads when it comes to upgrades. Remember, the proportioning system is only going to send approx 30-35% of the stopping power to the rear so focusing on the rear is not as important as good pads and rotors in the front, IMO.

Unless you are towing 10,000lbs or road racing, Wagner rotors and pads should have been sufficient. I've never had any problems with Wagner.
I am towing 12,500 lbs and there has been times where my trailer brakes weren't working and the truck had no problem stopping until I put on the wagner pads
 
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Just put power stop rotors and pads on the rear of my truck. I feel no difference in daily driving. Next time I have to haul stuff ill pay attention and see how they do.
 

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Your brakes are biased to the front not back - front should always be first.

Don't waste your time with cross drilled AND slotted - you're losing surface area on the rotor for the pads to bite. I usually stick with slotted only as its not as messy for the wheel areas. A good set of pads will do wonders even on stock rotors (because warped rotors are not physically metal warped its excess brake pad material that has welded it self to the rotor essentially).

The best upgrade on any vehicle? Pads and braided lines - less room for expansion equals a stiffer pedal.


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Your brakes are biased to the front not back - front should always be first.

Don't waste your time with cross drilled AND slotted - you're losing surface area on the rotor for the pads to bite. I usually stick with slotted only as its not as messy for the wheel areas. A good set of pads will do wonders even on stock rotors (because warped rotors are not physically metal warped its excess brake pad material that has welded it self to the rotor essentially).

The best upgrade on any vehicle? Pads and braided lines - less room for expansion equals a stiffer pedal.


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I disagree with this partially.. Rotors do warp, being in the manufacturing of wheels and brakes industry. It is not just the brake pad fusing itself to the rotor. The rotor can actually warp. It has a lot to do with heat cycling of the parent material. Warping a rotor can happen as simple as super heating the rotor and cooling it excessively fast (IE water splashing on hot rotor). Most rotors now days are so cheaply made with terrible iron. The rotors will actually rust out (delaminate persay) before you will even get a re-turn out of them. And all the new rotors at your local autoparts store are made in china, but they are cheap and still work.
The principle for drilled and slotted rotors is the slots will wipe the brake pad each time it passes through, and the drilled holes are soley for the cooling pf the rotor. Is it worth the extra money? Not unless your an agressive racer type.
Like someone said before, good pads and new rotors go a LONG ways.
 

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Like someone else mentioned. Slotted rotor and good pads. I personally will be doing Hawk Pads and EBC rotors eventually. I do tend to Haul and Tow on occasion.

This setup I believe is less then 350 last time I checked.



-Adam
 

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My rear rotor was trashed and the power stop kit was the same price and the oem kit. Really the only reason I went with slotted and drilled was because amazon offered them through prime with free 2 day shipping and I needed rotors ASAP.
 

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One thing the general populous doesn't always understand is that typical racing components are meant to work in racing applications and can actually hinder the usefulness of a daily driven vehicle. It's one thing I never understood in my 30+ years of being a gear head.
 

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Hawk LTS. Pads and Power Slot rotors. Lots of options out there.

I have this setup and like it. I tow a 7500lb tt about every other weekend and stop effortlessly. I also put this setup on my old Titan and it improved stopping performance significantly.

My 2 cents

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One thing the general populous doesn't always understand is that typical racing components are meant to work in racing applications and can actually hinder the usefulness of a daily driven vehicle. It's one thing I never understood in my 30+ years of being a gear head.
Exactly. It's like the poeple that complain that the TRD BBK stops in exactly the same distance as the stock brakes...DUH...If the stock brakes are able to activate the ABS just like the BBK then they will stop in the same amount of time. It's when those components get heat soaked that they stop better. It's not likely that normal street driving will ever encounter this. Tow a trailer through the mountains or spend a day at the track and you'll notice a big difference....same with drilled and slotted rotors and ceramic pads.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
So what pads and rotors are ideal for towing and stopping? slotted, holed, regular? What brand ?
Power stop, Toyota, etc ?
 

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Your brakes are biased to the front not back - front should always be first.
Not true any more. Or at least not all the time. My VW (well, the model not just mine) is notorious for eating rear brake pads before fronts, typically at a rate of 2x the fronts. In order to help front end dive on braking, rear brakes are often activated first--on the VW anyhow it's called Electronic Brake Distribution, or EBD. On a truck I'd expect similar, since during towing the rear brakes are capable of doing much more work. The ABS controller deals with lockup issues but I'm guessing they can play with bias just the same with the controller, without having to wait for a tire to lock up.
 
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Not true any more. Or at least not all the time. My VW (well, the model not just mine) is notorious for eating rear brake pads before fronts, typically at a rate of 2x the fronts. In order to help front end dive on braking, rear brakes are often activated first--on the VW anyhow it's called Electronic Brake Distribution, or EBD. On a truck I'd expect similar, since during towing the rear brakes are capable of doing much more work. The ABS controller deals with lockup issues but I'm guessing they can play with bias just the same with the controller, without having to wait for a tire to lock up.
What size are the rear calipers compared to the front on your VW? :)
 

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What size are the rear calipers compared to the front on your VW? :)
Looks like 280mm (11inch) front and 232mm (9inch) rear for rotor size. Vented front/solid rear.
 

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Ding ding. It can bias on the fly, I get that. You lock the rears up more than the front and you'll have zero turning ability and will under steer straight into the back of a car.


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Huh?

I can tell you, fronts lock up more often on mine. Only times I've gotten it to lock up is in snow, but it certainly feels like a front tire lockup. A few times I've had the ABS kick in when the front tire drops off pavement into the driveway, and I know that's a front wheel ABS incident.
 

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Huh?

I can tell you, fronts lock up more often on mine. Only times I've gotten it to lock up is in snow, but it certainly feels like a front tire lockup. A few times I've had the ABS kick in when the front tire drops off pavement into the driveway, and I know that's a front wheel ABS incident.
Because the brake system is proportioned to favor the front.
 
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