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Discussion Starter #1
My 2013 Tundra failed annual inspection due to worn brakes. Truck only has 40,000 on it, seems a little early for brakes to me.

I do haul a trailer with a compact tractor occasionally, but it's a small one, not many miles and the trailer has brakes.

Am I expecting too much? I have heard (from non-Toyota people) that Tundras are hard on brakes.
 

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No, all my toyos (from camry to Lexus in the house) had 90-100k before brakes were changes. Maybe yours were sticking?


“Don’t overthink something simple people... ..:sigh:..”
 

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No, all my toyos (from camry to Lexus in the house) had 90-100k before brakes were changes. Maybe yours were sticking?


“Don’t overthink something simple people... ..:sigh:..”
I have had something like 9 Toyotas. That includes the 3 now in the driveway. I have routinely seen this kind of mileage ^^^ on Mama Toyota factory/OEM front brake pads. On my 1997 T-100 I replaced the front pads at 109,079 miles, then replaced them again at 200,500 with a reasonable amount of miles still to go on the pads. Rear are drums and still on the stock shoes at 247,111 miles.
 

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My 2013 Tundra failed annual inspection due to worn brakes. Truck only has 40,000 on it, seems a little early for brakes to me...
As others have said, Toyota's brakes last a long time. My first Toyota was a first gen 4Runner; put 178K on, changed the front pads once, and finally just gave up trying to wear out the rear shoes and replaced them with a rear wheel bearing at about 150K.

Assuming you've had the truck since new, it hasn't been abused, and I'm sure that pulling that small trailer with a lawn tractor didn't wear your brakes out. Further, I find it improbable that sticking calipers would cause all corners to wear out at the same time, but you do live in the land of snow.

So...I'm guessing you had them change the brakes to get that inspection sticker without bothering to have the tech show you how badly they were worn? "Trust, but verify".
 

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Discussion Starter #5
As others have said, Toyota's brakes last a long time. My first Toyota was a first gen 4Runner; put 178K on, changed the front pads once, and finally just gave up trying to wear out the rear shoes and replaced them with a rear wheel bearing at about 150K.

Assuming you've had the truck since new, it hasn't been abused, and I'm sure that pulling that small trailer with a lawn tractor didn't wear your brakes out. Further, I find it improbable that sticking calipers would cause all corners to wear out at the same time, but you do live in the land of snow.

So...I'm guessing you had them change the brakes to get that inspection sticker without bothering to have the tech show you how badly they were worn? "Trust, but verify".
It's an 18 foot trailer with a Kubota B2650 and usually a 4 foot tiller or a 5 foot bush hog. Probably in the neighborhood of 5000 pounds with trailer and load.

Mechanic is an old Navy buddy. We both retired at about the same time and have known each other for 30 years. And yes he DID show me the pad wear indicators. Originally thought the rotors were good, but apparently they're on the thin side and grooved pretty badly.
 

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It's an 18 foot trailer with a Kubota B2650 and usually a 4 foot tiller or a 5 foot bush hog. Probably in the neighborhood of 5000 pounds with trailer and load.

Mechanic is an old Navy buddy. We both retired at about the same time and have known each other for 30 years. And yes he DID show me the pad wear indicators. Originally thought the rotors were good, but apparently they're on the thin side and grooved pretty badly.
Well, that tow isn't a lawn tractor for sure, but like you, I would still expect more than 40K miles out of a set of brakes. Congratulations on having someone in the car repair business you trust.

Brake life comes down to how the vehicle is driven (driver habits), and the environment it's driven in. Heavy grooving of the rotor faces indicates that you drive under conditions with a lot of abrasives (dirt and sand) like dirt or gravel roads. If foreign materials are wearing the rotor faces, they will certainly wear away the softer friction surfaces on the pads. I drive only on paved roads, and like an old geezer, so my brakes last forever and my rotors always have a "phonograph finish".

For the purposes your Tundra is used for, you may have to live with shortened brake life. Or, you can search the archives for experience with the aftermarket options available. An interesting observation is that you didn't experience warped rotors; that's usually the problem late-model Tundra owners are seeking relief from, and that may be the genesis of the "non-Toyota" peoples comments. It's a well-known problem that is related to hard braking quickly followed by stationary cooling, or, maybe just razor-thin casting margins to reduce rotor weight.
 

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My 2014 1794 4x4 has 37k on the odo and the fronts seem to be good but the rear rotors are in pretty bad shape and making a slight squeaking noise I can hear when rolling at a slow speed. Driving me crazy.. so I just ordered a F/R full set of R1 concept rotors and ceramic pads for under $200. From what I've read a lot of people have problems with factory rotors warping. I tow my boat about 15 miles round trip at the most and it has surge brakes. Also, I remember reading somewhere online.. maybe caranddriver, that the brakes are one of the tundra's weak points but I've personally never had trouble stopping when I need to. Wish I had the money for the TRD BBK!!!
 

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It's an 18 foot trailer with a Kubota B2650 and usually a 4 foot tiller or a 5 foot bush hog. Probably in the neighborhood of 5000 pounds with trailer and load.
I'm guessing more than 5000.
Probably closer to 6 or 7k.
If you have a FEL and It's a HD equip trailer, probably closer to 7-8k.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I'm guessing more than 5000.
Probably closer to 6 or 7k.
If you have a FEL and It's a HD equip trailer, probably closer to 7-8k.
I got curious and looked it up.

Tractor: 2293 dry
Loader: 475
Bucket: 198
Mower: 600

So there's 3566. Add 500 for loaded tires and fuel, call it 4100.

Trailer is a "landscaping" trailer, guesstimate 2000 pounds.

So yeah, probably 6000 pounds plus.

Picked it up today. All the pads were down to the wear indicators, front rotors had about a 1/4" "ledge" of corrosion on the inside that had worn a matching groove in the pads. He didn't think turning them was a good idea given the overall corrosion and the condition of the vent webs in the center (thanks, MaineDOT ).

Rear rotors were good, just cleaned up and reinstalled.
 

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I haul around a tractor and equip trailer.
I still had plenty of life left in the pads/rotors and the trailer has brakes, but I switched to slotted/drilled rotors and Hawk pads upfront.
Does your trailer have brakes?
If not, or they're not working properly, an extra 6000# will wear out brakes in no time.
 

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A lot of that is going to depend on driving habits. As some people do not necessarily think that you either need to be on the gas or on the brake. I watch the flow of traffic, if I am coming up on a congested area I take my foot off of the accelerator and coast. I know lots of people capable of doing this and I also know a lot of people incapable of doing such. My sister-in-law had a 2003 Suburban that had almost 300K before the OEM brakes were changed. I had a 2003 GMC 2500HD that I sold with OEM brakes, still over half the life left. Pulling heavy objects will have a toll on the outcome as well, or can. Over the years I have noticed on more than one occasion people who ride their brakes all the time. Using an up-hill to scrub off speed helps as well. All your habits, good or bad, will factor in to the end results.......
 

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My only lasted till 30K. Rotors warped and I was having front end/steering wheel shimmy under braking. Haul stuff but no major towing on steep mountain roads and highways. I've been told it is fairly common for Tundras to need front rotors and pads in the 25k-35k range. Shouldn't happen but does.
 

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I've been told it is fairly common for Tundras to need front rotors and pads in the 25k-35k range.
Both my 2011 and 2015 were brake issue-free at 3 yrs/30k mi. And I haven't heard much about warped rotors and premature brake wear until recently.
Perhaps it's more common in the last year or 2. Not sure. But it was never something I experienced or heard about until recently.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I haul around a tractor and equip trailer.
I still had plenty of life left in the pads/rotors and the trailer has brakes, but I switched to slotted/drilled rotors and Hawk pads upfront.
Does your trailer have brakes?
If not, or they're not working properly, an extra 6000# will wear out brakes in no time.
Trailer does have brakes and I check the controller and set the gain to match the load on each haul. Crank it up until I can feel the trailer hauling the truck down.

However, I must be the first to admit my driving habits are NOT conducive to long brake life. Patience is not one of my many admirable traits...;)
 

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I have always had factory stuff needing work at like 40k. That was the case on my Dakota and my Tundra.


I get more like 60-plus out if aftermarket brake setups Lots of stop and go and I am generally hard on brakes. A lot of don't even realize how much their driving style wears brake pads and rotors down. Best combo I ever had was premium raybestos rotors and Bendix titanium pads on my 04 Dakota. After 4 years and 50k the mechanic was amazed at how new everything still looked. I wanted those pads for the Crewmax but couldn't find them. Probably could have easily gotten 100k out of them.
 

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NOT the end of the world and probl the first dollar on maint spent ( other than oil changes )

Ps. I would have put rotors on it , both rust edges on both sides = lost square inches of braking surface .

Ps. #2 . The truck weighs 6400# alone . But not as heavy as the cummins 3/4 tons im used to coming in at 7600+ pounds
 

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I am around 55k and need new brake pads and the dealership is telling me my rotors are somewhat warped.

Would I be better off in the long run just replacing them with something else (pads and rotors)?
 

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I am around 55k and need new brake pads and the dealership is telling me my rotors are somewhat warped.

Would I be better off in the long run just replacing them with something else (pads and rotors)?
As much as they charge to turn rotors now I just buy new rotors. If a caliper appears like it might be having issues, sticking or could potentially stick........I get new calipers to. Get all your new parts on, I start by using a big syringe to siphon the reservoir almost empty, fill with the correct, new brake fluid, then bleed the system accordingly (usually it is the furthest point from the reservoir and work your way closer) and bleed each wheel until fresh fluid is coming out and there are no bubbles or air pockets. This may sound like it costs a lot, but if you do the work yourself it usually isn't that bad. When you inspect your calipers, before you push the piston back in, make sure that piston is as clean as you can get it. I have had pistons stick because they were so dirty, but if you get it really clean before you push it back in it should be fine, unless that dust seal is damaged. Use a marine grade grease to lubricate any moving parts on your brake hardware (except the rotors of course).

Might add that if rotors are warped they will usually warp again. I was in the brake business for years and they referred to it as "The metal remembers". As in if the brakes are ever heated up again the rotors would warp back to the exact same.
 
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