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Hi everyone. New here . Have a 2016 5.7 trd off-road crewmax that started to do the EXACT same thing !! 23k original owner . Brought it to one dealer and said everything is fine . Any news or update ???
 

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Spark Plugs should indicate if it is really oil smoke.

I never looked at the original video before today but it doesn't look like oil smoke to me. Looks like fuel injectors leaking possibly leaking down and create a rich condition for a short period during startup. Just my penny.
 

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Spark Plugs should indicate if it is really oil smoke.

I never looked at the original video before today but it doesn't look like oil smoke to me. Looks like fuel injectors leaking possibly leaking down and create a rich condition for a short period during startup. Just my penny.
Still woorysome , that is washing oil away
 

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This is exactly what I had on my Supra and it wasn't a super hard/expensive repair. On the 2JZ, this is bad valve stem seals. Toyota uses 1 good one per valve, where some other brands have multiple cheap ones on each. It is usually a repair that requires pulling the head but some ingenious fella built a magnetic tool that lets you pull the stem up to reach the seal without breaking the head gasket loose (which is a bigger deal on that specific turboed engine). Check anything you can find on a smoky startup on a Supra or IS300 (less common/no turbo) for more details.
 

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Still woorysome , that is washing oil away
You should be able to tell the difference. Start the vehicle. Witness its occurring. Stop the engine immediately.

Pull the plugs to see you find one wet with fuel or oil residue.

It also could be excessive build up of condensation in the exhaust system.
 

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I've had the same issue goin on for a while now. Been back to the dealer a col times and they say nothing's wrong. It aggregates the piss out of me
 

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To address questions raised by OldGuy43 and McGov Tundra:

1- I bought the Tundra new - ordered it from the factory and carefully followed to a T Toyota's break-in recommendations as per the owners manual. This is probably the last new vehicle I'll ever purchase, and as such take exceptional care of it. Thus, I know that the engine has never been abused or driven hard and was meticulously broken in. I have read every post I can find about this issue and it affects many 5.7L engines. The evidence is pointing to a design flaw. What is really odd about this issue is that if you accelerate quickly as per the instructions above, you will not see any blue smoke during the higher RPM's. And if you do the above test and park the vehicle for a few minutes and then restart it while the engine is still hot, you won't see any oil burn either. It is only after the increased RPM run prior to completely cooling off the engine that you will see the oil burn at cold startup. This has the Toyota Field Service rep really puzzled.

2- I didn't want to get too bogged down with the details of all of the testing before Toyota would recommend a course of action (in this case, replacing the valve stem seals). Toyota required a series of tests, including compression tests, camera scopes (looking for oil residue), PCV valve check, ECU data analysis, etc. Then after the heads were removed, they were sent off to a performance machine shop to be spec'd. Everything checked out. There were no discernible issues. The local tech at the dealer doing the work has followed Toyota's guidance at every step.

Once again, I'd love for those of you with a 5.7L to conduct the test mentioned above and report back the results. In fact, it might even be instructive to have those of you with a 4.7L also conduct the test and see if you get the same results. It would be so helpful to have some data that we could feed Toyota.
My 2017 5.7 tundra just did this for the first time this morning. Drove home an hour on the expressway 75-80 mph. Got off my exit the rest of the way is surface streets 25-35 mph approximately 1 mile. Parked it. Started it this morning and there it was a cloud of smoke. White with a bluish tint. 24000 miles original owner Toyota serviced always synthetic oil.switched to Toyota after my ford was a lemon. Now what. Smh
 

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On my 2007 with 250,000 I get a touch of smoke randomly on a cold start, maybe once a month. Engine burns no oil. Smoke is more grey than blue. Cam.
 

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I decided to start a new thread to provide information that addresses multiple threads on this forum which mention that the 5.7L will occasionally burn oil on cold startup and create a cloud of blue smoke. This lasts 30 seconds. Other than this infrequent cold start-up oil burn, there is no indication on the dip-stick that the engine is regularly burning oil. You can see a video of what this blue cloud looks like by going here:



What has never been reported in the previous threads is that this problem can be replicated every time under the following conditions:

1- The engine has to be completely warmed up to normal operating temperature.
2- Within a couple of blocks of your destination, such as home or work, accelerate rapidly so that the RPM exceeds 3400 RPM for 3 or 4 seconds.
3- Drive it gently the remaining short distance to your destination and immediately turn off the engine.
4- Wait until the engine is completely cooled down (such as overnight, or at the end of your workday).
5- Start the engine and watch your right side mirror (or look out your back window) at the big cloud of blue smoke.

Would those of you with the 5.7L iForce (in a Tundra or Sequoia) perform an experiment under safe conditions and execute the above steps to see if your 5.7L does the same thing? Then please report back with your results on this thread. (Again, please execute these steps in a safe environment; don't romp on the accelerator in a residential neighborhood with a 25 mph speed limit.) Toyota feels like this is a rare or isolated problem. I have evidence from combing through posts on this and other forums that this problem is much more common than previously thought. What we don't know at this point is whether or not this problem affects all 5.7L or just a percentage of them. So please, help us gather some statistics that we can present to Toyota engineering to help them better understand the extent of what appears to be a design flaw.

NOTE: If addressing this issue under warranty with your dealer, Toyota will start by having the valve stem oil seals replaced. Please be aware that this will not fix the problem.
 

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I have 2019 tundra with 12,000 miles. Mine did this yesterday under just about same conditions. Called dealer. Of course they never heard of anything like this.
 

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2018 5.7 iForce with about 20,200 miles, Mine has done it a few times but weeks apart. After driving home about 10 miles or so in a 55MPH zone getting into my neighborhood for about a miles at 20mph. Before that just normal everyday easy smooth acceleration, let the truck sit overnight and once I start it in the morning. A puff of bluish smoke right as it starts and clear after that. After I saw it, me being a machinery technician my whole career smelt it and it had a slight burnt oil smell but didn't smell like your normally burning oil smell. It smelt different somehow. I am going to start looking into crank case vent tubing, vacuum hoses or anything else to see if anything is being sucked into the intake. I assume people have done al this before but I got the time to check it all out and would prefer to do it myself instead of reading it. Just think of it as peace of mind for me.
 

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Replacing piston rings ..... It would be FAR cheaper parts and labor to just warranty / replace the engine via mother Toyota . Not to mention far and away more leak free and reliable .
 
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