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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Last night I plugged in my block heater and went to start it up and saw the thermostat gauge was still cold. I also noticed no warm air coming out of the vents. This is my 1st block heater. Should the thermostat read a warm temp? Should a little bit of warm air come out of the vents? Or does it keep the engine oil warm only?
 

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Man, it was only like 23° there last night (per google :D).

How much you expecting a block heater to help?

A block heater only helps heat the block.

If you want to get in and have actual heated coolant circulating, Webasto had a heating system aimed at large trucks (semi's/commercial vehicles) that would activate at a set temp, or at a set time, or via remote, and heat the coolant, circulate the coolant, and even turn on the defrost.


Even on diesels, a block heater doesn't make instant heat. Block heaters are only intended to keep the block from freezing up/oil thickening up to the point that the engine can not start.

They (block heaters) are not to make it warm, only to make it able to start a vehicle in cold conditions.
 
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I have installed a block heater and use more around zero degrees. Truck is parked outside and I get heat within a minute or 2. My thermostat gauge starts at zero but climbs significantly faster in a shorter time then if truck wasn't plugged in. The starter also seems to not bog down as the oil as a little viscosity in it so it's not working so hard. If your engine block heater plugs in like mine in the engine figure it's warming whats closest around it like a quart probably not all 7ish quarts.
 

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I have installed a block heater and use more around zero degrees. Truck is parked outside and I get heat within a minute or 2. My thermostat gauge starts at zero but climbs significantly faster in a shorter time then if truck wasn't plugged in. The starter also seems to not bog down as the oil as a little viscosity in it so it's not working so hard. If your engine block heater plugs in like mine in the engine figure it's warming whats closest around it like a quart probably not all 7ish quarts.
It's like using the smallest burner on the stove, with the largest pan.


It helps, but it certainly wont get everything up to temp.

They do what they are designed to do, make it start/start easier in cold temps.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Man, it was only like 23° there last night (per google :D).

How much you expecting a block heater to help?

A block heater only helps heat the block.

If you want to get in and have actual heated coolant circulating, Webasto had a heating system aimed at large trucks (semi's/commercial vehicles) that would activate at a set temp, or at a set time, or via remote, and heat the coolant, circulate the coolant, and even turn on the defrost.


Even on diesels, a block heater doesn't make instant heat. Block heaters are only intended to keep the block from freezing up/oil thickening up to the point that the engine can not start.

They (block heaters) are not to make it warm, only to make it able to start a vehicle in cold conditions.
I wanted to try it out, it was supposed to get down to 0 last night. Never did we had cloud cover and warmed up. Lowest it got was 10. Not sure what I was looking for, I guess I thought a magic unicorn would appear, and bam warm heat. Never had one before didn't know what to expect do now. I remember last year I started my Xterra and it was -28F out. Never heard such a rough start in my life. It will be good for those weeks.
 

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I wanted to try it out, it was supposed to get down to 0 last night. Never did we had cloud cover and warmed up. Lowest it got was 10. Not sure what I was looking for, I guess I thought a magic unicorn would appear, and bam warm heat. Never had one before didn't know what to expect do now. I remember last year I started my Xterra and it was -28F out. Never heard such a rough start in my life. It will be good for those weeks.
That is what it was made for.

The extreme cold.

I have had -18. Never had an issue with any of my yotas, but I always have had remote start.


On those cold days I just let er warm up.


Have even done the restart when it was less than -10. It's only fuel, which means it's only money.

I can't take money with me, but I can take a warm car much more comfortably. :D:lol5:
 

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If you had something that could pull coolant temp via ODBII and display on a digital read-out, you could see exactly what all the block heater does. The block heater generally doesn't keep coolant temp much higher than just above freezing. As you discovered, enough to help it warm up a bit quicker, but not a miracle. It's not a remote start. ;)
 

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If you had something that could pull coolant temp via ODBII and display on a digital read-out, you could see exactly what all the block heater does. The block heater generally doesn't keep coolant temp much higher than just above freezing. As you discovered, enough to help it warm up a bit quicker, but not a miracle. It's not a remote start. ;)
I purchased a Toyota Canadian block heater part specific to the 5.7 most of us have in our tundra's. There is a write up on this forum about installing it. Mine heats my oil not coolant. It is true our Toyotas have no problem starting in colder temps but you may notice a sluggish or harder start in the cold. Remote starter or not colder temps are harder on engines. Again I don't use my block heater all the time but on those cold mornings of -10 below hearing my truck start with no hesitation and no lights dimming 'warms my heart' if you can feel me.
 
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