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You guys are scaring me regarding the long term (~20 yrs) serviceability.
Bought a new 2018 Crewmax just 2 weeks ago, to replace an "old school" 1994 GMT400 4wd SUV (Tahoe/Suburban/Silverado platform) that was wearing out. Never, ever had those kinds of problems.
But, I live in snow/ice/salt free climate ... hopefully that prevents these seizing/snapping bolt problems.
 

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I read references to "strainer" above. Does the 3rd gen trans (5.7L) not use a conventional paper-type element, that sits low in the pan?
I still own other, older GM cars, and they mostly use a flat, sheet metal encased filter element, with a suction tube that goes up into the trans's internals.
 

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I wonder if the road salt was the main culprit for the bolts snapping? On my '07 5.7L, I've dropped my trans pan twice with no issues at all. Once at 100k and again at 200k. Each time I changed the trans filter, cleaned out the pan (which was pretty spotless anyway) and did a fluid replacement. The fluid replacement method I used was to pin open the thermostat and then remove the cooler line near the grill - start the truck and pump out 2 quarts, then pour 2 quarts of new back into the trans. Repeat until you hit 12 quarts.
This is exactly what I did.
You guys are scaring me regarding the long term (~20 yrs) serviceability.
Bought a new 2018 Crewmax just 2 weeks ago, to replace an "old school" 1994 GMT400 4wd SUV (Tahoe/Suburban/Silverado platform) that was wearing out. Never, ever had those kinds of problems.
But, I live in snow/ice/salt free climate ... hopefully that prevents these seizing/snapping bolt problems.
My 2010 CM has been in Phoenix all 177k pan came off no problem, underside of the truck is clean.
 

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Semantics. Yes, the Tundra transmission uses a filter element. I think Toyota actually labels it a "strainer". I call it a filter because it sure looks like one to me.
 

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I asked a few years back about using my 14' Tundra as my tow vehicle (28' RV trailer / 7600 lb. wet) should I be changing my tranny fluid at a shorter interval ??? Answer RUN IT TILL IT DIES...You have life-time fluid....That was the Toyota service manager.

I'm really on the fence on what to do in the future. Only have 45k on the Tundra, but 75% are towing miles including 14k RT to Alaska in 16'. Going back next summer and thought at 50k what service items should be done? Trans case fluid change? rear dif? throttle body service?

I even have issues with the 10k oil change intervals. I do have the Toyota 8 year, 100k factory warranty ($0 deductible). My thinking is, let them change the tranny fluid, if "THEY" break off any bolts, it's on them...or my warranty covers it.
 

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I asked a few years back about using my 14' Tundra as my tow vehicle (28' RV trailer / 7600 lb. wet) should I be changing my tranny fluid at a shorter interval ??? Answer RUN IT TILL IT DIES...You have life-time fluid....That was the Toyota service manager.

I'm really on the fence on what to do in the future. Only have 45k on the Tundra, but 75% are towing miles including 14k RT to Alaska in 16'. Going back next summer and thought at 50k what service items should be done? Trans case fluid change? rear dif? throttle body service?

I even have issues with the 10k oil change intervals. I do have the Toyota 8 year, 100k factory warranty ($0 deductible). My thinking is, let them change the tranny fluid, if "THEY" break off any bolts, it's on them...or my warranty covers it.


The manual used to say 60k or something like that if used for towing.

I had to argue with Toyota to change my fluid


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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...Answer RUN IT TILL IT DIES...You have life-time fluid....That was the Toyota service manager...
Remember they mean the truck's "lifetime", and not your lifetime ;-)
If the truck engine, transmission, etc, catastrophically fails at an early age due to never changing fluids, it's "lifetime" is over ... by definition, the fluids did last for its lifetime, didnt they? ;-)

I dont buy in to any of this "lifetime" fluid or component baloney. Notice how the Mfrs never publish actual data for failure rates versus time or mileage. I suspect the Mfrs assume the average owner only keeps a vehicle for 5-7 years and that's their functional definition of "lifetime". The "average" person is permanently making car payments for the rest of their life.

IMO, a fullsize body-on-frame truck , or SUV built on a truck platform, should easily last 20 years or 200K miles with good maintenance.
Major components will start to wearout by 200K-250K miles, so it's up to the owner to decide if its worth his effort/time/money to start replacing front suspensions, install crate engines, etc.
I consider it acceptable for minor components to need replacingm starting at around 100K-ish miles: starters, alternators,water pumps, AC compressors, fuel pumps, etc. Still more cost effective than dropping $40K+ on new vehicles.
 

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You guys are scaring me regarding the long term (~20 yrs) serviceability.
Bought a new 2018 Crewmax just 2 weeks ago, to replace an "old school" 1994 GMT400 4wd SUV (Tahoe/Suburban/Silverado platform) that was wearing out. Never, ever had those kinds of problems.
But, I live in snow/ice/salt free climate ... hopefully that prevents these seizing/snapping bolt problems.
If this is your first Toyota after a lifetime of GM products, I can understand your anxiety having started with GM myself. In the late 70's, GM design, quality, and reliability took huge declines. When I needed a 4WD truck in the mid-eighties, I shunned the crap GM was offering and bought a one-year-old 4Runner.

I found the design of the truck rugged and simple where it needed to be (drivetrain, suspension, chassis, interior amenities) and leading edge tech where it needed to be (electronic ignition and direct fuel injection while GM was still screwing around with TBI).

That truck was my primary transportation for 32 years and 178K miles. It never left me on the side of the road, but I did replace some minor components (master cylinders, slave cylinders, alternators) mostly due to my own neglect. At about 150K one rear axle bearing went bad and I replaced it.

Through ignorance, I also discovered the mechanical weakness of the 22RE engine...the timing chain. This is not unlike the pan bolts on the Tundra transmissions that surprised the OP; all brands will have weaknesses that have to be discovered and addressed. Except for that one time with the timing belt, the 4Runner had never seen the inside of a Toyota service department.

Once GM began making some progress back with Bob Lutz at the helm, I shopped and bought another GM product...a Malibu LTZ. My understanding is that Bob Lutz personally reviewed the car from concept to assembly line, and it's been pretty good one. Aside from the front strut replacement and a timing cover oil leak repaired under warranty, it's been a pretty good vehicle mechanically (10 years, 85K miles). The interior features and amenities have been less reliable: plastic trim falling off early, one rear door lock broken, driver side door has to be unlocked with the key when it gets hot, little stuff that drives you crazy. Both rear struts have rattles, but still perform as intended, so we're driving it until they don't.

You can quit wringing your hands and worrying about your Tundra not having "long term" serviceability, reliability, and longevity...in those areas, it will in all likelyhood, beat the everlivin' hell out of any GM truck product they're offering now, even if the Tundra does have a quirk or two. Unfortunately, it will take decades for you to realize you don't have to worry. Toyota is very conservative with their maintenance recommendations...if you follow what they recommend, but not necessarily taking it in for dealer maintenance, you'll be fine.

P.S. For normal driving, GM's oil life monitoring algorithm on Corvettes and my Malibu will routinely show 10-13K between changes for conventional oil or synthetic. For my driving style, I had already convinced myself that 10K was a good change interval based on my own maintenance experience, and GM's oil life monitor confirmed it for me.

P.P.S After 32 years and 178K, do you think I sold the old 4Runner for salvage? Heck, no, it was still going strong, but those major components you mentioned would have made it unreliable for long distances. Those simple old First Gen 4Runners are now SO OLD, they've come back into style as classics. I cleaned and polished it up, and sold it to a happy camper in May 2017 for only about $4500 less than I paid for it originally. :)
 

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I’m going to start at the end and work my way through the whole bloody story.
Please read the whole post before you pass judgment and assume I’m just another idiot who shouldn’t touch a wrench...

In the process of doing a simple automatic transmission fluid drain and refill on my 2014 tundra, I managed to strip the pan drain bolt, snap 5 (FIVE) of the 12 bolts that hold the pan on, and strip 1 of the 4 bolts the secure the filter to the valve body. This is the AB60F transmission.

A little background and how I got this lucky:

The truck had just shy of 60K miles on it. I had not bought into the whole “lifetime” transmission fluid business; it just didn’t make sense. Nothing lasts forever and I couldn’t figure out how or why WS fluid would be an exception. Bearing this in mind, I decided it was time to change the fluid and after much debate, research, and a phone call to the support line to Valvoline, I went with Valvoline Maxlife ATF. I had used this product in place of several other vehicles that called for WS with absolutely no issues.

Before tearing into this project I purchased a new filter, trans pan seal, and O-rings / crush washers for all the plugs I knew I’d need. I wasn’t planning on having to drop the pan but I figured I’d be a fool to not at least have them on hand.

Prior to attempting anything I soaked the plug and pan bolts in penetrating oil several times over the course of 3 days. I live in an area that gets plenty of snow and with it comes plenty of road salt. Nothing looked like it needed that much attention as the truck was rust free but I knew better then to skip such an easy step.

I pulled the truck in the garage before it had a chance to warm up so everything was at ambient temperature. I pulled the fill plug first to make sure it wasn’t stuck and it came out no problem. I then pulled the check and drain bolts which also came out easily. After letting the fluid drain I put the drain bolt back in and began tightening it to 15 Ft. Lbs. per the manual using a 3/8” torque wrench that was known to be accurate. The bolt got just about to the point that the wrench was going to click indicating it was torqued when all of a sudden the resistance went away and the little sucker just started to spin in place. “Sh*t”.

The drain bolt was stripped in the pan and would just spin in place whether I tried to tighten it or loosen it. I tried a few tricks I knew of including grabbing it with vise grips and doing a pulling / turning motion to try to get the threads to engage. I also tried some heat and jamming a stout flat head screwdriver in between the bolt flange and the pan to try to put some down force on the bolt while I also spun it… no luck.

Time to pull the pan so I can punch the drain bolt out. There were 12 6MM bolts holding the pan on. Using a ¼” ratchet I very gently started to back out the pan bolts. 5 of them snapped off flush with the trans case the moment I put any kind of torque on them; FIVE with no warning what so ever. 4 of them were on the sides of the trans so they were through and through, one of them was near the rear of trans where the transfer case is mounted and was in the blind so I couldn’t see or feel the other end of the bolt.

Upon getting the pan off I figured I was already in this for the long haul and I couldn’t possibly have any more fasteners bust so I decided to pull the 4 bolts that hold the filter on. They all came out no problem. I popped my new filter and O ring in and put the bolts back in. 3 of them torqued to 7 Ft. Lbs., 1 of them just barely torqued and I could feel it getting “mushy” in its threads but it was in there.

I could not for the life of me get the mangled drain bolt out of the pan with out getting destructive. I tried pressing it with a few long sockets and a ball joint press among some other tricks for about an hour. I eventually decided to punch it out with the right size punch, hammer, and wood blocks. I was able to drill and then run a heli-coil and larger bolt in to replace the plug.

Back to the pan bolts; I tried to drill the five busted off bolts out using a hand drill and a steady hand thinking I could slap in a few heli-coils and call it a day. I had done this many times before with success; not this time.

The drill bits “walked” off the bolts surface and botched the aluminum transmission case to the point that only one of the five holes would accept and hold a heli-coil. I didn’t have a welder handy so I couldn’t do any tricks with welding another bolt to what was left of the snapped off bolts. At this point I was very desperate and pissed off and probably not thinking as clearly as I should have been so, this is what ya get.

What I ended up doing was cleaning the transmission surface very thoroughly with brake clean and roughing up the surface with some 100 grit sand paper. I took some JB weld and packed the now egg shaped bolt holes with the goop and let it sit for a full 24 hours to cure. I then drilled the hardened resin with the right size bit and got some new, longer 6 MM bolts, nuts, and washers. I secured the pan to the transmission using the longer bolts that ran through and through so I had a nut and washer on the top side of the trans for the bolts to anchor to.

The blind bolt near the transfer case just would not hold. I tried tapping the hardened JB weld with the right tap but the bolt just would not torque up.
To make up for this I used a healthy bead of black permatex RTV the whole way around the top of the rubber gasket that sits between the trans pan and transmission belly. I figured this should more then make up for any lack of torque that that one missing bolt might not provide. I let the RTV set up for a full 24 hours before filling the transmission back up and going through the whole fill and check procedure (why don’t they just give us a f**king dip stick?).

Its been a month and I’ve gone through a few hundred miles and several heating and cooling cycles and I haven’t had any leaks so I think I might be good.

To be clear, I am not a professional or credentialed automotive mechanic. I have built rebuilt cars in my garage, worked on aircraft and ships in the military and I work in the rail industry on locomotives all day long as a mechanic. I am also a licensed electrician. I say all that to say I’m not a dummy. I have worked on mechanical “stuff” for over 20 years and I am confident when it comes to fixing vehicles, particularly when were just talking maintenance items. All that said, this thing kicked my ass.

If you are going to try this just be prepared for a friggin’ nightmare.

Maybe my truck was built on a Friday by a disgruntled assembly line guy who said to hell with the torque wrench, maybe the 6MM bolts they used on the stupid trans pan were cast incorrectly, or maybe my stupid luck just ran out. Whatever the case, you’ve been warned.
i snapped off a bolt on my 2013 c0rolla . i just ignored it.the pan wont leak with one bolt missing.there seems to be corrosion on the bolt threads. perhaps bolts of a different metal might work better
i live in sc. this shouldent be a issue
 
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