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Just can back from Lake Tahoe (steep highway) and I noticed pretty bad shaking in my steering wheel on the down hill. No shaking on flat roads now. I read in forums that this may be because the brakes overheated. I’ve never pulled a trailer, boat, etc. My truck (2016 Tundra DC 4x4) had some camping gear inside the bed during the latest drive, but nothing significant in weight. A little concerning since 1. Only 23k miles 2. Bought the truck with the plans to tow my rock crawler on a trailer 3. Thought the brakes were built for towing etc. The 20k service showed 7mm of brake pad left on all 4 wheels. Do the brake rotors need to be changed if they are warped?
 

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I had a similar problem however mine warped while towing a trailer. Dealer turned the rotors and replaced the front pads. Been good since. Mine was around 20k, 27k now

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2012 Tundra and had the same problem 2 times. Had dealership turn the rotors at around 70,000 miles ($135) then had the same thing happen again at around 140,000 miles. I let Midas turn them that time for $70. I will be buying new rotors if/when it does it again.

I put new rotors from NAPA on my wife's 2015 Sienna because the rotors were warped and the dealer wanted $300+ to replace them. I paid $180 for the ones at NAPA and they've had no issues in 2 years.
 

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Warped rotors happen when the rotors get hot from stopping fast, or holding the brakes on for a long time (like going down hills), or when stopping big loads. If you come off a highway or stop a big load, the rotors get extremely hot. The higher the speed and the more the weight the higher the temperatures. And when you stop, the rotors that are exposed to the air cool at one rate, while the rotor that is behind the brake pads stays very hot, and the rotors warp.

You can prevent warped rotors by using your brakes less to stop, and stopping slower, to keep the rotor temperatures down. But if you do a high speed stop, or a big load stop, try to stop a little short and let your truck just barely roll so the rotors continue to rotate so the rotors can cool more evenly. This really will prevent a warped rotor. I have not had a warped rotor for years now by doing this.

If you are going down hill, don't use your brakes to control your speed. Use the engine by shifting to a lower gear and let the engine rev. If the engine cannot control your speed, then put the brakes on, and let them off, back and forth like that so that they have a chance to cool off. Don't just use the brakes for long periods to control the speed. You will get those rotors red hot and warp them and you can even lose your brakes if you get things too hot.
 

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I have a 2013 Rock Warrior Crew Cab and I haul a smaller toy hauler that scales out at about 8K when I have my SxS in it. I use the gearing pretty exclusively when descending, but I have the shaking OCASIONALLY. I figure it's something to do with the anti-lock system or something of the sort. Again, it is an intermittent shake, and it's not specific to hauling the trailer; it's done it without the trailer attached. When it starts, I am usually slowing the rig as I am descending, and it will keep doing it for a time. When I make a stop and turn the truck off, the shaking will usually be gone and the braking will be smooth as butter. Truck has 60K and I've not done any brake work on it yet.
Ideas?
 

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Just can back from Lake Tahoe (steep highway) and I noticed pretty bad shaking in my steering wheel on the down hill. No shaking on flat roads now. I read in forums that this may be because the brakes overheated. I’ve never pulled a trailer, boat, etc. My truck (2016 Tundra DC 4x4) had some camping gear inside the bed during the latest drive, but nothing significant in weight. A little concerning since 1. Only 23k miles 2. Bought the truck with the plans to tow my rock crawler on a trailer 3. Thought the brakes were built for towing etc. The 20k service showed 7mm of brake pad left on all 4 wheels. Do the brake rotors need to be changed if they are warped?
Make sure you have weight distribution bars and make sure its set up for the truck & trailer loaded. Then make sure your trailer brakes are fresh and working properly, set the brake controller on a high setting so they grab first before your truck brakes engage. Then before any Trip, make sure your calipers slides are cleaned an lubed. Then make sure your rotors arent already heat glazed or got blue ring of death on the friction surface. Top off fluids and your good.
 

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Make sure your lug nuts aren't overtightened. 98ft/lb for aluminum and 150 for steel. Most shops use impact wrenches without regard to torque. Too tight and it tensions/spring-loads the rotor. After 5 to 10k miles, the rotor is either cut away at the high spots, or brake pad material is deposited there. The result is a pulsation on moderate breaking downhill or from high speeds.

People describe it as warped but it's really deformed due to that overtightening, not overheating.

I was turning/replacing rotors on my tundy and Sequoia after 10k+ miles before I figured this out. After ensuring that I wasn't above 98ft/lbs, I've not had an issue on either vehicle.

Just today I had my Sequoia tires rebalanced and rotated. Despite asking the local shop to use a torque wrench, when I got home to verify they were all above 150.
 

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Just can back from Lake Tahoe (steep highway) and I noticed pretty bad shaking in my steering wheel on the down hill. No shaking on flat roads now. I read in forums that this may be because the brakes overheated. I’ve never pulled a trailer, boat, etc. My truck (2016 Tundra DC 4x4) had some camping gear inside the bed during the latest drive, but nothing significant in weight. A little concerning since 1. Only 23k miles 2. Bought the truck with the plans to tow my rock crawler on a trailer 3. Thought the brakes were built for towing etc. The 20k service showed 7mm of brake pad left on all 4 wheels. Do the brake rotors need to be changed if they are warped?
hi everyone.i was in the same boat with my 2006 and 2012 tundra. on the 2012 dealer replaced brake rotors and pads at 17k when i complained about them during a visit for a TSB(013112) regarding the backing plate/deflectors.but the brake judder reappeared.i was only able to resolve the issue after doing what is stated in this article.also read this common causes of brake judder https://www.apcautotech.com/getmedia/aff05081-b7c5-4089-b572-28081c018d29/CommonCausesofBrakeJudder.pdf and https://www.apcautotech.com/getmedia/b62c7705-ab5f-4a05-97a8-4a7390feedd1/Centric_and_APC_Technical_Whitepaper_C2-Bed-In-Theory-8-2018_1.pdf
Bedding in Brakes
by Dave Zeckhausen
BMW F30 with StopTech front brakes
Bedding allows your brakes to reach their full potential. Until they are bedded, brakes simply do not work as well as they can. If you've installed a big brake kit, changed pads and rotors, or even purchased a new car, you should set aside time to bed the brakes per the instructions below. Proper bedding improves pedal feel, reduces or eliminates brake squeal, prevents (and often cures) brake judder, reduces brake dust, and extends the life of pads and rotors. For more details on the theory of bedding, please refer to this article: Pad and Rotor Bed-In Theory, Definitions and Procedures
Caution:
Immediately after installing new pads, rotors or a big brake kit, the first few applications of the brakes will result in very little braking power. Gently use the brakes a few times at low speed to build up some grip before blasting down the road at high speed. Otherwise, you may be in for a nasty surprise the first time you hit the brakes at 60 mph.
If you just installed rotors with zinc plating or if the rotors have an anti-corrosion phosphate coating, you should postpone bedding until normal driving has allowed your pads to polish the rotors clean and removed all traces of the plating or coating. If your new brake rotors have an oily anti-corrosion coating, clean this off thoroughly with brake cleaning spray and/or hot soapy water before installation.
Read and understand these instructions completely before starting. If you have questions, give us a call or email. Do not substitute higher speeds for the 60mph called for. The heat in brakes goes up exponentially as you increase the speed from which you brake. Repeated stops from 80 or 90mph with street pads will overheat the brakes and you may end up having to replace pads and rotors.
When following these instructions, avoid other vehicles. Bedding is best done when traffic is light, as other drivers will have no idea what you are up to and may respond in a variety of ways ranging from fear to curiosity to aggression. A police officer will probably not sympathize when you try to explain why you were driving erratically! Zeckhausen Racing does not endorse speeding on public roads and takes no responsibility for injuries or tickets you may receive while following these instructions. Use common sense!
  1. From 60mph, gently apply the brakes a couple times to bring them up to operating temperature. This prevents you from thermally shocking the rotors and pads in the next steps.
  2. Make eight to ten near-stops from 60mph to about 20 mph. Do it HARD by pressing the brakes firmly, but do not lock the wheels or engage ABS. At the end of each slowdown, immediately accelerate back to 60mph, then apply the brakes again. DO NOT COME TO A COMPLETE STOP! If you stop completely, with your foot on the brake pedal, pad material will be imprinted onto the hot rotors, which could lead to vibration and uneven braking.
  3. The brakes may begin to fade after the 7th or 8th near-stop. This fade will stabilize, but not completely go away until the brakes have fully cooled. A strong smell from the brakes, and even some smoke, is normal.
  4. After the last near-stop, accelerate back up to speed and cruise for a few minutes, using the brakes as little as possible to allow them to cool down. Try not to become trapped in traffic or come to a complete stop while the brakes are still hot.
  5. If full race pads, such as Hawk DTC-70 or Performance Friction PFC11 are being used, add four near-stops from 80 to 20 mph.
After the break-in cycle, there should be a slight blue tint and a light gray film on each rotor face. The blue tint tells you the rotor has reached break-in temperature and the gray film is pad material starting to transfer onto the rotor face. This is what you are looking for. The best braking occurs when there is an even layer of pad material deposited across the rotors. This minimizes squealing, increases braking torque, and maximizes pad and rotor life.
After the first break in cycle shown above, the brakes may still not be fully broken in. A second bed-in cycle, AFTER the brakes have cooled down fully from the first cycle, may be necessary before the brakes really start to perform well. This is especially true if you have installed new pads on old rotors, since the pads need some usage to conform to the rotor wear pattern. If you've just installed a big brake kit, pedal travel may not feel as firm as you expected. After the second bedding cycle, the pedal will become noticeably firmer. If necessary, bleed the brakes to improve pedal firmness.
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OP . Yours is a 2016 .

At some point , Toyota supposedly updated the front rotor shields for improved cooling .

I do not know this 100% eyes on , seen both , nor the specific model years involved .
 

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My 2006 Ltd CC owned since New has had the warp factor, but just having the seized caliper issue at ~96K.
Got the OEM Rebuild Kit $21 but need to do Pins/springs/cotters, perhaps SS lines.
Found the evidence of it on D.S. and sanded/smoothed/greased pins but gonna replace rotors/pads with Rebuild.
An alignment shop torqued my rims down to over 150 ft/lbs on my brand new set just installed to cause it.
Bastards.
 

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It seems so. Doing most every repair/replace/upgrade/maintenence myself, it is so disappointing to get screwed the 1st time letting any shop touch her.
And FAIL they did. It really literally made me sick.
Did I mention they didn't even change my own initial camber settings I did in my driveway?
I knew it was real close, but for God's Sake!!!
I had just replaced EVERY Ft End Susp part, other than UCAs, at 95K and it was running like a New Lexus until they got their RIPOFF hands on her...
And when I confronted them 5 guys hot around me and started lying their asses off, each one with a different lie/ cause. Also more Hell, but only rangers to repeat the whole 8 hrs of torture.
It is a Jungle out there...
Went back over everything.
I now have her close to back to perfect. PITA
883047

883049
 
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