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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Equipment,
08 tundra DC with 5.7
Helwig helper springs

So I’ve been camping now for about 3 years. We were pulling a 30’ TT that was around 7500 loajded. WD hitch worked well but truck still squatted a slight bit. I was ok with it though.

Fast forward to this year and due to some issues I sold the Camper and we quickly found another. Only problem is, IT HEAVY!

9200lbs empty. Around 10,300 loaded. Tounge weight is killer too at 1100lbs!

Ok ok so it’s a big trailer. Bigger truck is planned but not this year. Any time we will pull it farther than 20-30 miles it will be with my dads f350.

My standard pull is 20 minutes of 2 lane flat highway to the lake.

I added a class 5 hitch to handle the weight. I also bought a blue ox WD hitch with 1500lb bars.

The helwig springs do nothing for this setup and are coming off. They interfere with the class 5 braces anyway.

I’m contemplating doing the Firestone airbags

Is anyone else towing 10,000 occasionally?

Anyone have a trailer with excessive tounge weight that they pull?

I’ve pulled it once already. Truck has the power. Brakes work awesome on the trailer and all brake components are new on the truck.
Just wondering if anyone has anything that works well with the tundra for big trailers?

Well something other than “buy a bigger truck”. It’s planned at some point.
 

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Looks like you've reached your truck's limit......

I pull around 8.5k when hauling tractor on utility trailer plus our 33' TT is around the same.

A 1/2 ton chassis and it handling characteristics as all vehicles have physical and legal limits.

That much weight will have a tendency to 'push' your rig around, so hope you get your new 3/4 ton rig soon for (Happy) New year's !:D;)

on edit: it is all about proper set up and although you are aware of being way over the limit it happens waaaay to frequently regardless of truck used....
I hang out over here an read this thread and no doubt these types can be found on other boards as well.....
read and learn .......and when you get the right truck make the right set up.

https://www.ford-trucks.com/forums/1521881-how-on-earth-did-he-do-this.html
 

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I don’t know bud, that’s big for a tundra

Your WAY over payload loaded and with all the people. I bet you add more than 900 lbs going from your unloaded to loaded trailer weight you listed.

Just get a bigger tuck now, it’s not worth the risk, not what you wanted to hear but it’s what should be done to keep you out of any bullshit legally and liability wise while your trying to get your chill on

Or just borrow the f-350 when you want to pull everytime until you can get more truck
 

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I have pulled around 12.5k lbs a couple times. Like you short trips 10 miles each way. All stock other than the lift. I wouldn’t recommend towing that much all the time but I had to a couple weekends. Truck handled it fine but legally it’s not worth it.



I just got a 34’ 5th wheel. Only 6500 dry but I was told a 700-800 pin weight (I think it’s a little higher than that). I added some sumo springs to help the sag and I’m still trying to dial that in since I’m lifted.

I know it’s not the same situation as you but I’m right around max payload with the 5er and I regularly tow in the 5-8k lb range with a bumper pull trailer. Try to lighten the load in the truck as much as possible until you get an hd truck.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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C'mon Man...who ever sold you that camper and told you the Tundra is enough truck is a real dirt bag...

You need a 3/4 or 1 ton diesel...
 

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He's "WAY" overloaded at 10,300 lbs ???

I don't think so.

At least not according to the owners manual. I mean, I can appreciate trying not to cross the line, but give Toyota some credit. IIRC, a 2008 4x4 DC 5.7 is rated to pull 10,300 lbs with a payload of 1580 lbs (granted, the payload varies a bit with options, but not by much). I didn't see where the OP states how many clowns he puts in his DC, so I guess we can assume him, a significant other, and maybe a few gremlins. As long as they don't weight a metric poop-ton each, there could easily be less than 500 lbs of people in the truck and still be under on payload with 1100 lb tongue. Sounds like he's covered by the paper-pushers and sticking within the realm of rated ability of the truck. Oh, oops, he might be over on tongue weight a smidge. But his GCVW should be in spec.

To the OP, yes, I do pull around 10k occasionally - a few miles to a few hundred miles. Never had an issue. As long as you understand that you are pulling 10k worth of shotput behind you and don't drive like a dink - which it sounds like you understand - I believe you would be just fine with your 20 mile flat lander trip.
 
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I've got to agree with Blenton. If your only driving 30 miles up to the lake a couple times a year then why drop 40k on a 3/4 ton.

I do the same exact thing your doing except my camper weighs in at 7500 lbs empty. So I'm close to 9000 lbs by the time we load it up with hot dogs and hamburger buns.

We load as much as possible to the back of the camper to reduce tounge weight. The things you would normally put in the bed of the truck goes to the back of the camper if possible or over the camper axles.

As far as the sag is concerned, just use your headlight adjuster, and ride out! And of course use common sense. LOL.
 

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If you added a class V hitch, that means you didn't have the factory hitch, which means you didn't have the factory tow package, which means you're not even close to being within capacity for the truck. Unless you mean something else? The factory hitch on the Tundra that comes with the tow package trucks is a class IV weight distributing hitch, and specifically designed for the truck (obviously), and cannot be removed without removing the bed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks guys
I’m kinda along the lines of Blanton. I might be over a bit but it’s not by much. I usually drive alone to the campground and my wife follows in the van with the kids and all the “stuff”. Bikes are about all that is added to me and we are talking 2 10 speeds and 2 toddler bikes.

To riccnick, if I were to have a truck without a factory tow package could you please tell me what would make it grossly different than one with??

A tow haul button, factory trailer wiring, hitch reciever, trans cooler, 4.30 gears (as opposed to 4.10’s)

What am I missing? A sticker on my door??

I’ve done the wiring, I’ve done the class 5 hitch, I’ve done the digital break controller, I run in 4th gear any who, and I’m not running for 4 hours at interstate speeds or through the mountains so the trans temp doesn’t bother me.

Honestly, help me out here. Not trying to be a jerk. What am I missing?

As I said before, she’s big and she’s heavy, but you all know these trucks pull like a house. I would easily put it up against a mid 90’s 3/4 ton any day.

Have I pulled heavier with this truck? Yes, once, won’t do it again. 14k worth of skid steer 10 miles to my house. It was too much even at 30-40 mph in the country.

I drive cdl class trucks and trailers daily. Not saying I’m the best driver in the world but I’m not new to towing either. I just honestly wanted an idea if others were having any trouble with 10k and a tundra.

Keep the comments coming. This has been very helpful.
 

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Ok, so yes the Tundra can tow a smudge over 10K...great...it still puts you at the operating limit and by your own admission, potentially over the maximum. I mean, short distances of less than 50 miles maybe it is ok...anything more and the risk goes up...

All up to you and what risk you are willing to accept.
 

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Thanks guys
I’m kinda along the lines of Blanton. I might be over a bit but it’s not by much. I usually drive alone to the campground and my wife follows in the van with the kids and all the “stuff”. Bikes are about all that is added to me and we are talking 2 10 speeds and 2 toddler bikes.

To riccnick, if I were to have a truck without a factory tow package could you please tell me what would make it grossly different than one with??

A tow haul button, factory trailer wiring, hitch reciever, trans cooler, 4.30 gears (as opposed to 4.10’s)

What am I missing? A sticker on my door??

I’ve done the wiring, I’ve done the class 5 hitch, I’ve done the digital break controller, I run in 4th gear any who, and I’m not running for 4 hours at interstate speeds or through the mountains so the trans temp doesn’t bother me.

Honestly, help me out here. Not trying to be a jerk. What am I missing?

As I said before, she’s big and she’s heavy, but you all know these trucks pull like a house. I would easily put it up against a mid 90’s 3/4 ton any day.

Have I pulled heavier with this truck? Yes, once, won’t do it again. 14k worth of skid steer 10 miles to my house. It was too much even at 30-40 mph in the country.

I drive cdl class trucks and trailers daily. Not saying I’m the best driver in the world but I’m not new to towing either. I just honestly wanted an idea if others were having any trouble with 10k and a tundra.

Keep the comments coming. This has been very helpful.
I think you've been given a lot of sound advice and looks like your still fishing to read something that supports your pursuit of using the present prime mover.
when in reality you've already been told you need a 3/4 ton and the present truck was not originally set up with the tow package.
Don't know what else your fishing for but dude just man up and get the right size truck and enjoy life......
Don't think you really realize the risk and liability you leaving your self and family open to. Final and last thoughts....
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks guys
I’m kinda along the lines of Blanton. I might be over a bit but it’s not by much. I usually drive alone to the campground and my wife follows in the van with the kids and all the “stuff”. Bikes are about all that is added to me and we are talking 2 10 speeds and 2 toddler bikes.

To riccnick, if I were to have a truck without a factory tow package could you please tell me what would make it grossly different than one with??

A tow haul button, factory trailer wiring, hitch reciever, trans cooler, 4.30 gears (as opposed to 4.10’s)

What am I missing? A sticker on my door??

I’ve done the wiring, I’ve done the class 5 hitch, I’ve done the digital break controller, I run in 4th gear any who, and I’m not running for 4 hours at interstate speeds or through the mountains so the trans temp doesn’t bother me.

Honestly, help me out here. Not trying to be a jerk. What am I missing?

As I said before, she’s big and she’s heavy, but you all know these trucks pull like a house. I would easily put it up against a mid 90’s 3/4 ton any day.

Have I pulled heavier with this truck? Yes, once, won’t do it again. 14k worth of skid steer 10 miles to my house. It was too much even at 30-40 mph in the country.

I drive cdl class trucks and trailers daily. Not saying I’m the best driver in the world but I’m not new to towing either. I just honestly wanted an idea if others were having any trouble with 10k and a tundra.

Keep the comments coming. This has been very helpful.
I think you've been given a lot of sound advice and looks like your still fishing to read something that supports your pursuit of using the present prime mover.
when in reality you've already been told you need a 3/4 ton and the present truck was not originally set up with the tow package.
Don't know what else your fishing for but dude just man up and get the right size truck and enjoy life......
Don't think you really realize the risk and liability you leaving your self and family open to. Final and last thoughts....
I actually drove a 3/4 ton ford today that I liked a lot. My wallet however did not like it so much. Lol. Looking at 35k even after the trade in and that’s for a gas engine truck.

I’m honestly not fishing for anything. Just another average joe trying to get a feel for things and using this site for a resource. After reading more of the towing section I see that there are a ton of these questions so I understand why some get testy about the same question asked over and over. I should have read a bit more first.

My question about the tow package vs non tow still stands. What are the actual differences?

Caleb
 

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To riccnick, if I were to have a truck without a factory tow package could you please tell me what would make it grossly different than one with??

A tow haul button, factory trailer wiring, hitch reciever, trans cooler, 4.30 gears (as opposed to 4.10’s)

What am I missing? A sticker on my door??

I’ve done the wiring, I’ve done the class 5 hitch, I’ve done the digital break controller, I run in 4th gear any who, and I’m not running for 4 hours at interstate speeds or through the mountains so the trans temp doesn’t bother me.

Honestly, help me out here. Not trying to be a jerk. What am I missing?
So, what you're missing is a truck rated to tow what you're towing. Its that simple. I'm not trying to be a jerk either, but, here's some logic you should understand:

I drive cdl class trucks and trailers daily. Not saying I’m the best driver in the world but I’m not new to towing either. I just honestly wanted an idea if others were having any trouble with 10k and a tundra.
You have a CDL? How much trouble would you be in if you got caught with one of your rigs overweight? Regardless of what the truck "could" pull.
 

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So, what you're missing is a truck rated to tow what you're towing. Its that simple.
Also not trying to be a jerk......

After what you posted above, I got to thinking and dug out the sales brochure for my '12 Tundra. I remembered that the brochure had nice charts with all the specs for the Tundra. For the 5.7L V8, ALL the towing weights in the charts have a notation next to the weights. When I looked up the notation next to all the weights it stated "Requires Tow Package". The brochure does not even specify a weight for a Tundra without the tow package. I am thinking this is what you meant by your post.


I'm not trying to be a jerk either, but, here's some logic you should understand:
You have a CDL? How much trouble would you be in if you got caught with one of your rigs overweight? Regardless of what the truck "could" pull.
The original poster probably does not need to worry about being pulled in for a safety check when towing his TT where he lives. However, in other parts of the USA that is NOT THE CASE. Where I live here in Eastern Pennsylvania the local Township sets up a safety check periodically and REQUIRES ALL Commercial Trucks and ALL Private vehicles towing trailers to submit to inspection. I personally have been pulled in myself with my personal tow vehicle and enclosed car trailer. I had to provide Registration and Insurance documents and was REQUIRED to pull onto the scales to have my rig weighed. I do not tow overweight so I had nothing to worry about. Others were not so lucky. Don't know what the fines/penalties are nor do I want to find out.

BTW, I wish I lived in another part of the USA where some of you guys live. Whenever one of these threads come up there seems to be a common consensus that towing overweight is okay close to one's home. I have encountered a number of real BONEHEADS that had pulled very STUPID maneuvers around me when I am towing close (<20 miles) to my house. For me, that proves that idiots are everywhere including close to my home and being close to home is no justification for me to tow overloaded. I am guessing that many of you live in the middle of nowhere with few other vehicles on the road?
 
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I agree with most folks opinion that you need a bigger truck with that much weight to pull it safely. But again you're only traveling a short distance with no hills, so you could get by with what you have for the time
being - just take it easy. Your original question also asked about adding Firestone airbags. I'm not endorsing that adding them will solve your weight problem, but it will help with your sag issue. I have a 2008 Crewmax with the factory class IV hitch and HD cooling option, and I tow a 30' TT weighing in at about 6550 dry, but I also carry a generator and extra water. Still under 10K. I also have a 4" lift and didn't want the front end facing towards the sky while towing simply because I'd have to adjust the headlights every time I towed and the doesn't handle well with the front end up and the rear sagging. So I added the Firestone airbags, and I'm really glad I did. It helps level the truck out and add some payload capacity. My first trip was up to the Sierra mountains last fall, up and down hills at 9K+ altitude. I had no problems with the ride and the airbags leveled the truck out nicely. I load up the trailer first, then inflate the airbags to about 55 lbs pressure. I installed them myself and it was pretty easy.
They'll help your current situation for now, but if you're planning on taking any longer trips, I'd seriously think about getting a 3/4 ton ride.
 

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I routinely pull well over 10K with a 2010 CrewMax 5.7, use equalizer hitch, proper hitch weight distribution, and load range E tires. Also have serviced all my gearboxes with Royal Purple Max Gear 75/140, and use synthetic oil in the engine. Also use premium gas when heavily loaded.

I installed the Firestone W217602445 Ride-Rite Kit, which took the shake out of the bed on rough gravel roads, makes the truck ride much softer than the stock suspension, and levels the chassis. I also allows one to balance the load so the hitch bars do not put too much weight to the front suspension.

The only trouble I ever had was the OEM tires were insufficient to handle even a 5k load on a trailer, and they disintegrated from the inside out. Found they were 2 ply sidewall and 4 ply tread, and insufficient to handle even the rated load on twisty rural roads.

I am a farmer, owned this truck since new, and will keep it until I run the wheels off! Best truck I ever owned, and gave the Ford diesel to our oldest daughter because this gets better fuel economy, rides better, does not need oil changes every 3,000 miles, and only repair ever done was the chickencrap plastic seat surround on the driver's seat. My only complaint is the doors are too short for drivers over 6'2" tall with long body length, have to duck and slide into the driver"s seat and that puts a lot of weight on that weak plastic seat surround and breaks the mounting underneath.
 

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I have a stock '14 TRD DC and have been pulling a 37' TT using a WDH. Dry the TT is 7,404, loaded with gear, and with the four of us in the truck I'm nearing the Gross Combined weight of 16,000 lbs.

Likewise I've had weight concerns while pulling it and a bed full of bikes/coolers, etc.
 

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Glad I found this thread...I too purchased a "larger" RV trailer. Smaller than the OP's, but still larger than my old 2013 26' (4400 dry / 5800 wet) The new tt is 28' (6400 dry and I'm guessing at 7800 wet) The problem is that it's tongue is heavy (840 lb dry). It is a rear kitchen RV, so that will counter some weight on the front, but still I'll be a hair over 1k up front. With 1200 WD bars my 14' Tundra Limited bed lowers 2-3/4" from normal ride height. Towed the new RV 2200 miles across country from the dealer. Tundra had plenty of power, but either bags or doing something with the OEM Tundra springs is in order.

While in Myrtle beach this past fall saw a number of Tundra owners towing clearly "well over" their Tundra's limits. One person had a 38' triple axle tow hauler, another had a 5th wheel he said dry was over 2000 lb. pin weight and total trailer weight at 12.5k plus 4 kids and all their junk....

I'm in the process of getting new truck tires. The OEM tires are the Bridgestone Duelers (275 55R 20') rated at 2403 lb. each. I'm looking at the General Tire Grabber APT rated at 2900 lb. each. More of a on/off road tire more suited to towing than the OEM Bridgestone's.
 
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