Toyota Tundra Discussion Forum banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Do not accuse me of being a troll by posting this thread.

As seen in my other posts, my attorney has taken my F150 lemon law case and I will be in need of a replacement truck by year's end. A 2016 Tundra is top of my list and gasp, I am potentially considering a GM or even another F-150. The Tundra is clearly my first choice and as long as I can get one with the right options that is the route I'll take.

However if I can't get what I want in a reasonable amount of time, I'll need a plan B. Hopefully I won't need that.

So Y2KX era Tacoma's had huge issues with Frame rust and so did some early T100 and first generation Tundras. I have only heard about Lug nuts and bumpers rusting on newer Tundras which while still not acceptable, is no where near as egregious as an entire frame rusting through.

Insight is appreciated.

NC
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
151 Posts
I traded in a 2011 F150 for my 2014 Tundra. The F150 already had rust on the rear axle, and leaf springs on delivery. Frame was ok. Many F150 owners had complain about this at the time. As for the Tundra. No rust to be seen anywhere on delivery. The Tundra is still virtually rust free underneath, and I live in the midwest with salt in the winter. No rust seen on the frame, or lug nuts to this date. The hats on the rotors still look good as well. Unlike the F150.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
My rear seat brackets are rusting on my 2 month old 2015 crewmax. While I'm not happy that I have to deal with it, I am happy that my dealership is going to replace the brackets without giving me any hassle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
650 Posts
So far I have 12000 miles on my 15 Crew Max. It has not been through a winter here yet, we use salt on the roads by the bus load so I am not sure how well it will fare through its first winter, but so far so good. I was under her the other day and did not find any rust of note.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
345 Posts
I have a 2014 CM Tundra with 19000 miles and live in Houston, Tx and I have found rust throughout the vehicle but nothing that I'm worried about just minor things that see wear so its expected. Like mentioned above all my seat brackets feet have rust spots inside the cab...which is a little concerning that I think Toyota dropped the ball there. The first day I picked my truck all the disk brakes were forming rust but is expected if you drive it enough. I do see a lot rust on the suspension system, on the spindle, backside of the tow hook, leaf springs, some bolts on the tailgate. Nothing crazy but I do mess with my truck a lot so I keep and eye on it. Even though it was a recall and Toyota did fix it...(5) of my lugs nuts were rusted and had cracks half way though them. Lol made things real difficult when installing my lift and one lug complete sheared in half...like really Toyota what is your QA/QC doing??
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,820 Posts
Just hit the small spots once a year with some flat black paint. I did it the other day. It took me an hour or so. The spare tire was pretty bad. We also had a really bad winter past year. Lots of road salt =rust I don't care what you drive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts
So Y2KX era Tacoma's had huge issues with Frame rust and so did some early T100 and first generation Tundras. I have only heard about Lug nuts and bumpers rusting on newer Tundras which while still not acceptable, is no where near as egregious as an entire frame rusting through.

Insight is appreciated.
I had a 2003 Tacoma. However, it's whole life was in Texas, except for when it was assembled at the old NUMMI Plant in California. So it never suffered any of the rust issues many of the other northeastern, rust-belt area Tacomas had.

Ironically enough, the Tacoma frames were made by Dana Corp.'s Tennessee plant, which also made (maybe still makes?) the F150 frames. The rumors on the 'net are that Dana Corp. never applied the same rust-preventive coatings on the Toyota frames that were apparently also applied to the F150 frames. Assuming that's true, I don't know if that's because Dana was simply following Toyota's frame spec instructions or what, but that's the unsubstantiated internet rumor going around one of the Tacoma forums years ago when this issue first arose.

As for the newer Tundra frames, I'm hoping Toyota (and Dana Corp. if they still make them), learned its lesson from that costly fiasco. Kudos to Toyota, though, for stepping up to the plate and offering to buy out the older trucks and replace the frames on the other year trucks. Don't know if any other auto manufacturer would have done the same to make things right, but I thought that was telling.

I have a '15 Tundra, and the only rust I've found so far is at the exposed threads of the top rear shock mount studs, which came like that from the dealer. Thought that was kind of odd.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
How in the world would they replace a frame? That requires removing everything and I would think the owner would end up with a rattle can of a truck but that is just how I perceive a frame change to be.

As long as new Tundra's aren't experiencing the full blown rusted frame I am fine. I just hope I can find what I want when my case settles. Supposedly I'll get an offer and once I accept, the process will be done in a week. That isn't much time to find a new Tundra DC with the options and color I want. Oh well, I typically put the cart before the horse so I'll try to just be patient and when a settlement is reached, worry about it then.

NC



I had a 2003 Tacoma. However, it's whole life was in Texas, except for when it was assembled at the old NUMMI Plant in California. So it never suffered any of the rust issues many of the other northeastern, rust-belt area Tacomas had.

Ironically enough, the Tacoma frames were made by Dana Corp.'s Tennessee plant, which also made (maybe still makes?) the F150 frames. The rumors on the 'net are that Dana Corp. never applied the same rust-preventive coatings on the Toyota frames that were apparently also applied to the F150 frames. Assuming that's true, I don't know if that's because Dana was simply following Toyota's frame spec instructions or what, but that's the unsubstantiated internet rumor going around one of the Tacoma forums years ago when this issue first arose.

As for the newer Tundra frames, I'm hoping Toyota (and Dana Corp. if they still make them), learned its lesson from that costly fiasco. Kudos to Toyota, though, for stepping up to the plate and offering to buy out the older trucks and replace the frames on the other year trucks. Don't know if any other auto manufacturer would have done the same to make things right, but I thought that was telling.

I have a '15 Tundra, and the only rust I've found so far is at the exposed threads of the top rear shock mount studs, which came like that from the dealer. Thought that was kind of odd.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts
They bought the earlier 1st generation Tacomas (96-00?) at 1.5x Blue Book value, then crushed them. They swapped the frames on the later 1st generation Tacomas (01-04?) at the dealership. I don't know why they decided to do it that way, though, but the frame swaps were done at the dealerships. The frames had to fail a specific test for rust before they would offer to buy or swap the frame. And yes, they removed everything. I don't remember reading on the Tacoma forums about problems afterwards from those whose frames were replaced. Not that there weren't any, I'm sure, but it seems like the frame swaps for the most part have been going well. In fact, they're still doing them, mostly in the northeastern rust belt areas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
261 Posts
My 2000 Tundra underwent a frame replacement after inspection on the corrosion recall. The work was done in 2012.

Was told by the service manager that if any rust perforations in the frame greater than a certain size (about the size of a quarter, IIRC, but don't hold me to that), then it failed.

There are a number of videos/time lapse of this repair on the net.

At the dealership, they lifted the bed off the frame, and the cab as an assembly. They removed the drive train. All components were inspected for rust; brake lines, wiring, fuel lines. Optional items were not replaced free under the recall. However, other parts were. They destroyed the lower A-arms on the front end when they removed them form the old frame, so I got new lower A's as part of the deal. They replaced all old bushings between the frame and body. I paid for a certain number of new parts that I wanted refreshed. For example, the trailer wiring harness was corroded. I paid for a new one. I paid for some other parts as well. They didn't charge me labor for putting those on. Optional aftermarket items (cap and nerf bars) were put back on the truck as is.

After the work, the truck was very quiet, and drove well. I drove it for another 3 1/2 years until it was totaled in a deer strike.

Overall, I thought they did great job, especially considering that thye didn't owe me anything on that 12-year old truck that had 130K miles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,665 Posts
No rust issues at all. If you give regular maintenance you're good to go.

Already been through two Dallas winters and this must be the "salt" city of the world. If the temps get below 40 degrees here they keep covering all 20 counties in the DFW area with salt until the temps get back above 40 again - figgin insane. This must cost trillions in damage to roads and vehicles.

Many of the new 2015 F150 owners in the DFW area are already complaining about the major rust (frames, powertrain, suspension) on the new trucks and those trucks have not yet been through winter. That was the main reason for the "fake frame shortage" a few months back. Allegedly Ford has fixed that problem - so they say? I have seen "two" Ford Dallas dealers do repairs on this and the repairs look good so far, but still none of these trucks have been through winter yet.

My 2011 F150 had a moderate amount of rust on it in two years, but nothing major like some of the 2015 F150's I have seen. It spent most of its time in Houston and only "one" Dallas winter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts
I'm in the Dallas area, too, but it was my understanding no salt is used during ice storm events, only some kind of sand mixture. I could be wrong about that, though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,665 Posts
The TxDOT and NTTA have been very aggressive with all types of Salt products. It is a major “sell” campaign to mostly “brainwash” the public and get taxpayer dollars.

Whether it is a “mixture” with sand or any of the liquid salt brines it will eat up a vehicle in short order, unless you aggressively rinse it off.

dallas winter road salt - Bing
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,414 Posts
prep it for winter.. I coat mine with fluid film aerosol before the winter and the truck still looks pretty good on the underside, differential and all
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts
The TxDOT and NTTA have been very aggressive with all types of Salt products. It is a major “sell” campaign to mostly “brainwash” the public and get taxpayer dollars.

Whether it is a “mixture” with sand or any of the liquid salt brines it will eat up a vehicle in short order, unless you aggressively rinse it off.

dallas winter road salt - Bing
The first article that pops up on that bing search is this:

Dallas Preps For Icy Roads With New Type Of Salt « CBS Dallas / Fort Worth

The "A-Salt" mixture they use is supposedly 40-50% less corrosive than regular salt - but that just means it's still corrosive! Well that sucks. I'm guessing its comparatively infrequent use here in Texas spared my '03 Tacoma's frame all these years from the rust issues the northeastern Tacoma frames experienced with the more frequent salt use. Even so, I sure hope the new Tundra frames have better rust-preventative measures than the older Tacomas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts
Some links (old ones) that talk about the early frame rust issue:

Toyota Tundra Frame Supplier Dana Off The Hook, No Rust Fix Yet | Tundra Headquarters Blog
Toyota Seems To Admit First Generation Tundra's Suffer From Frame Rust | Tundra Headquarters Blog

According to this 2003 article, it sounds like Dana's Tundra frames may have been made in Kentucky, not Tennessee like I had originally thought:

Dana - News Releases

From the following link, it sounds like the driveshafts, at least for the Sequoias, were made in Dana's Tennessee plant:

Dana Corporation Providing Frame Assembly, Driveshafts for New Toyota Sequoia -- re> TOLEDO, Ohio, July 19 /PRNewswire/ --

This 2011 article claims Dana sold the two plants supposedly responsible for the frame rust in 2010:

Dana Corp ordered to pay Toyota $25m for frame rust issues - Torque News

So I'm wondering if Dana still makes Tundra frames?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
I have a 2016 Tundra - 4,000 miles. I was under it today and notice rust on the skid plate and around the front of the frame. the truck has yet to see salt. It will soon, as i am in the midwest and snow/ice is expect soon. What do you guys think?
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
486 Posts
I have a 2016 Tundra - 4,000 miles. I was under it today and notice rust on the skid plate and around the front of the frame. the truck has yet to see salt. It will soon, as i am in the midwest and snow/ice is expect soon. What do you guys think?
I've got a 2016 w/10k miles and live in the Midwest. Already been thru 1 winter with it, it has spots like your showing. You can fluid film your truck if it bothers you too much. That will keeps the rust at bay. Otherwise, just drive it and give it a good wash down underneath between snows.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top