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Wherever the factory happens to be of the lowest bidding manufacturer :dunno:
Trd & Trd pro wheels are made by BBS (Germany)
 

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Thanks for the help, but my impatience took over and I bought the TRD pro wheels from HH wheels for 200 each. I do like the look of those ultra wheels and I wish I saw those first, I didn't really see anything under $180 that I liked. The wheels did not come with the Center caps so I need to still find those and TPMS.
Word must be getting out on these. Same rims from the same site are now priced at $289.95 vs the $200 that bigmoo paid just over a year ago. I really like the look of the Pro rims and I'm not a fan of going with a non-factory offset rim.

I currently have the TRD Off-Road rims and called around locally to see what it would cost to powder coat them. We only have one shop locally and they wanted $700 and several days to complete the coating and that was with me bringing in bare wheels. They did offer the option to dismounting and remount my tires for an additional cost of $500.


ALY75157.PB01FF Toyota Tundra TRD Wheel Black Painted #426110C200
 

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No practical reason to switch, unless you're lifting the truck. In that case, I like to widen the track with a more aggressive offset to counter the raised center of gravity, mitigating likelihood of rollover. I consider overall wheel weight and diameter carefully when choosing wheels & tires. In general, adding wheel/tire weight decreases acceleration and MPG. Sometimes just one size difference, or tire load rating, can mean adding significantly more weight. Too aggressive wheel offsets are effectively changing suspension geometry and leverage ratios, possibly leading to accelerated wear in bearings and other components.
 

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NIn general, adding wheel/tire weight decreases acceleration and MPG. Sometimes just one size difference, or tire load rating, can mean adding significantly more weight.
It's the rolling resistance (frictional dissipation due to hysteresis) not weight that hits MPG. There can be a big difference between tires and heavier ones *tend* to have more resistance because there is more material, but it isn't that simple unfortunately.

Tires and Fuel Economy - Four Wheeler Magazine
 
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