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Found this part number 35330-60060 looks right just want to be sure before I drop $45.

BTW This site is a great resource had complete part numbers

Toyota parts catalog
Great thread, I just got a 2010 5.7 Crewmax and when they told me the Tundra had "lifetime" trans fluid at the dealer I cringed.

That parts site wants a frame number that does not accept my VIN or any part of it, none of it looks like their examples (5TFEY5F19AX077857) anyone know what they want or where I can find it?

Thanks
 

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For me there seemed to be more room to do the cooler flush portion closer to the radiator/cooler. I labeled the hoses, I'll get a picture....if I ever get my truck back from (dent) repair.
Here's how my transmission lines are routed through the radiator support.
 

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I have a question on this procedure. I've always done my own ATF changes on a regular basis with Amsoil, coming from Hondas and Nissans, the Tundra (2017 CM) will be my first Toyota.

I plan on doing this the simple way, draining the 1 gallon from the pan using a measuring bucket, replacing the exact amount. I will do this probably 3 or 4 times to get as much new fluid as possible as I only have 8700 miles on the Tundra (bought new, no towing yet). After this initial swapping of fluid, I'll do the same every other oil change (done every 5k).

My question is, if I do the method of draining lets say exactly 1 gallon, and refilling with exactly one gallon, do I need to do the hot level check?
 

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My question is, if I do the method of draining lets say exactly 1 gallon, and refilling with exactly one gallon, do I need to do the hot level check?
If your tranny had a dipstick, would you check your work by pulling the dipstick when you finished?
 
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I have a question on this procedure. I've always done my own ATF changes on a regular basis with Amsoil, coming from Hondas and Nissans, the Tundra (2017 CM) will be my first Toyota.

I plan on doing this the simple way, draining the 1 gallon from the pan using a measuring bucket, replacing the exact amount. I will do this probably 3 or 4 times to get as much new fluid as possible as I only have 8700 miles on the Tundra (bought new, no towing yet). After this initial swapping of fluid, I'll do the same every other oil change (done every 5k).

My question is, if I do the method of draining lets say exactly 1 gallon, and refilling with exactly one gallon, do I need to do the hot level check?
Let me see if I am understanding this correctly. Are you going to change out one gallon every 10k miles or are you going to change out one gallon at a time, doing that 3 or 4 times, every 10k? Because either way seems to me to be way over the top, particularly with a full synthetic.
 

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If your tranny had a dipstick, would you check your work by pulling the dipstick when you finished?
I would because it's simple enough to do regardless if I actually needed to or not. Let's put aside the differences between trans with dipstick and Toyota's "sealed" transmission pain in the ass method of checking the level. Let me ask the question this way, regardless of the transmissions fluid check method, if one is measuring EXACTLY 1 gallon out, and refilling EXACTLY 1 gallon in, is there really a need to measure the fluid level?


Let me see if I am understanding this correctly. Are you going to change out one gallon every 10k miles or are you going to change out one gallon at a time, doing that 3 or 4 times, every 10k? Because either way seems to me to be way over the top, particularly with a full synthetic.
I plan on doing an initial drain and fill about 4 times to effectively switch most of the fluid over to Amsoil. Then every 10k miles doing 1 drain and fill of 1 gallon to keep refreshing fluid. Plenty of people do such a thing rather than waiting 50k, 60k, or however many miles to do a complete switchover. It's also easier to do it that way, oil, oil+trans, oil, oil+trans, etc. I come from the Honda world and due to Honda's well known issues of their trans and fluid getting old, I'd just as soon keep that mindset with the Tundra and have peace of mind.
 

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I would because it's simple enough to do regardless if I actually needed to or not. Let's put aside the differences between trans with dipstick and Toyota's "sealed" transmission pain in the ass method of checking the level. Let me ask the question this way, regardless of the transmissions fluid check method, if one is measuring EXACTLY 1 gallon out, and refilling EXACTLY 1 gallon in, is there really a need to measure the fluid level?




I plan on doing an initial drain and fill about 4 times to effectively switch most of the fluid over to Amsoil. Then every 10k miles doing 1 drain and fill of 1 gallon to keep refreshing fluid. Plenty of people do such a thing rather than waiting 50k, 60k, or however many miles to do a complete switchover. It's also easier to do it that way, oil, oil+trans, oil, oil+trans, etc. I come from the Honda world and due to Honda's well known issues of their trans and fluid getting old, I'd just as soon keep that mindset with the Tundra and have peace of mind.
If you drain out EXACTLY 7.9 quarts of engine oil and add EXACTLY 7.9 quarts to the engine, would you not bother checking the level to be sure that there's the correctly engineered amount of lubricant in it? Same for the transmission. If Honda engines were known for engine oil issues and needing more frequent than average changes, would you apply the same service interval to your Toyotas? I realize that transmissions AND engines are expensive, but it seems that you might be being borderline wasteful (excess fluid changes) and neglectful (not checking for correct level) at the same time. That's just my perspective and is not meant as an insult, just my opinion. :)
 

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If you drain out EXACTLY 7.9 quarts of engine oil and add EXACTLY 7.9 quarts to the engine, would you not bother checking the level to be sure that there's the correctly engineered amount of lubricant in it? Same for the transmission. If Honda engines were known for engine oil issues and needing more frequent than average changes, would you apply the same service interval to your Toyotas? I realize that transmissions AND engines are expensive, but it seems that you might be being borderline wasteful (excess fluid changes) and neglectful (not checking for correct level) at the same time. That's just my perspective and is not meant as an insult, just my opinion. :)
Points well taken. I still would rather keep refreshing some of the ATF every so often rather than doing a complete swap every 50k, 60k or whatever miles though. As for checking the ATF level vs engine, I figure the trans doesn't consume oil like an engine can and that's why Toyota has this "sealed" trans. Question though, if I drain and fill it cold (lets say 1 gal), and I warm it up to check, wont it cause it to drain some amount out of the check plug due to change in temp/viscosity of the fluid (and thus have some amount lower than that 1 gal that was replaced)?
 

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I would because it's simple enough to do regardless if I actually needed to or not. Let's put aside the differences between trans with dipstick and Toyota's "sealed" transmission pain in the ass method of checking the level. Let me ask the question this way, regardless of the transmissions fluid check method, if one is measuring EXACTLY 1 gallon out, and refilling EXACTLY 1 gallon in, is there really a need to measure the fluid level?
Not ideal, but this would work if you did the temperature/level check first to verify that the level was within tolerances before you started. On my Subaru the difference between low and full on the dipstick seems to be about 4-6 oz (1/2 to 3/4 cup) of fluid, so the manufacturer's tolerances for level are pretty tight. I'm not sure you could maintain those tolerances "exactly" over multiple drain and fills without checking.

Question though, if I drain and fill it cold (lets say 1 gal), and I warm it up to check, wont it cause it to drain some amount out of the check plug due to change in temp/viscosity of the fluid (and thus have some amount lower than that 1 gal that was replaced)?
Not if the prior level check was done at the same (warm) temperature.

The level in the pan probably changes by several quarts (inches) depending on temperature and whether the engine is running or how long is has been since the engine was shut down allowing fluid to drain back into the pan.
 

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Points well taken. I still would rather keep refreshing some of the ATF every so often rather than doing a complete swap every 50k, 60k or whatever miles though. As for checking the ATF level vs engine, I figure the trans doesn't consume oil like an engine can and that's why Toyota has this "sealed" trans. Question though, if I drain and fill it cold (lets say 1 gal), and I warm it up to check, wont it cause it to drain some amount out of the check plug due to change in temp/viscosity of the fluid (and thus have some amount lower than that 1 gal that was replaced)?
I think that what @MtnClimber mentioned about potentially varying amounts of fluid actually in the pan best states why I, personally, would be inclined to be motivated to go through the bother of actually checking the level in the transmission. Of course I have the means available to me to do this at my convenience, so there's that bias.
 

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Toyota's "sealed" transmission pain in the ass method of checking the level.
I agree its somewhat of a pain to do the pin jumper method of verifying the temperature range for doing the level check. I haven't read through the 170+ posts in this thread, but I assume that alternative methods for verifying temperature may have been mentioned.

I personally would not want to have to mess with the jumpering operation while actually trying to put fluid in the transmission. In my mind you only need to do the pin jumpering exercise one time, in advance of your first drain and fill, if you have an alternative equivalent measurement tool than can be calibrated. For example, relatively inexpensive OBD scan tools are available that read out the transmission pan fluid temperature in real time. See:

http://www.tundratalk.net/forums/tundra-towing-hauling/683553-2014-tundra-transmission-temperature-2.html#post8720410

So you do a trial jumpering exercise until reaching the lower end of the temperature range, note the low-end pan temperature on the OBD scanner, continue with the jumpering exercise until reaching the upper end of the temperature range, and note the high-end pan temperature on the OBD scanner. Then when actually doing a level check you can use the OBD scanner rather than the jumpering method.

I suggest the need to calibrate the temperature range on each truck because different years, models, etc. have different temperature ranges. You could, of course, avoid the calibration step all together if you have the factory service manual that specifies the exact temperature range for your truck.

For those of us with older trucks with the transmission temperature gauge in the dash, the position of the needle (number of tic marks), can be noted at the upper and lower ends of the acceptable temperature range. Thus the dash gauge can be calibrated for the temperature/level check by a one time jumpering operation.

I hope this explanation makes the level check seem a bit less onerous.
 
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Not ideal, but this would work if you did the temperature/level check first to verify that the level was within tolerances before you started. On my Subaru the difference between low and full on the dipstick seems to be about 4-6 oz (1/2 to 3/4 cup) of fluid, so the manufacturer's tolerances for level are pretty tight. I'm not sure you could maintain those tolerances "exactly" over multiple drain and fills without checking.



Not if the prior level check was done at the same (warm) temperature.

The level in the pan probably changes by several quarts (inches) depending on temperature and whether the engine is running or how long is has been since the engine was shut down allowing fluid to drain back into the pan.
I think I understand. You're saying to do the warm fluid level check to make sure the current level is good, then I can do a drain and refill the exact same amount that drained?
 

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I think I understand. You're saying to do the warm fluid level check to make sure the current level is good, then I can do a drain and refill the exact same amount that drained?
Yes, I suppose you could. But it is no more effort to do it in the normal sequence (and you wouldn't need to be so concerned about "exactness").
 

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Where did I go wrong? I drained the pan, and removed what I think was the correct hose from the cooler line. (white insulation wrapped hose that is the bottom of the 2 coming out of the top of the thermostat) When I removed the hose, some more tranny fluid came out of it. I pinned the thermostat button and then I added 5 qts of new fluid. When I started the engine, the tubing that I had sqeezed onto the cooler line leaked and fluid started getting on the driveway. I stopped the engine and fixed the hose so it wouldn't leak again, then started the engine again. This time I noticed that fluid was coming out of the disconnected thermostat hose. I thought maybe that it was just going to be a trickle but it is actually a stead flow. I had a big drain pan under the truck so I caught that fluid separately. I filled about 3/4 of a gallon into an old milk jug from the cooler line and then shutdown. I thought that maybe the flow from the disconnected hose was due to me adding too much new fluid in after the initial pan drain so I added about 3 qts of new fluid and started it up again. Still flowing strong from both the disconnected hose and the cooler line. I decided to ask for help before I dug myself a deeper hole. Advice greatly appreciated!

1st pic is the vinyl tube on the cooler line
2nd pic is the disconnected hose that has fluid coming out of it. (its the bottom of the 2 insulated hoses)
 

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So i'm thinking that maybe fluid is siphoning out of the disconnected hose (I guess there's no check valve or maybe mine is busted) So I'm going to try propping it up and if it's still spewing ATF than ill try plugging it with something and continuing with the job because my truck is apart in the driveway and I kind of need it. I'm also wondering if I messed up by popping the hose off before adding ATF back into the pan after the initial pan drain. I bought 4 gallons of fluid so hopefully I have enough left to finish the job. Any advice greatly appreciated!
 

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I knew to tundras hear how many people of changed the transmission fluid with over a 100000 miles if so did it hurt your longevity of transmission I just bought the truck use and it's got 110 on
 

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Stupid speak to text. I am trying to determine how many ppl have changed trans fluid over 100000 miles and if so how many more miles have you gotten out of it? Also whats the cutoff mileage for changing it?
 

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I changed mine just after 120k.

Some have gone 200k before they "exchanged" the fluid. But I wouldn't recommend it.

I would exchange the fluid when you change your spark plugs at 120k.

I traded off my 07' with 241k, changed the plugs twice and exchanged the fluid twice.
 

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Thanks for the write-up and the good info. I have read thru all 12 pages and have a couple of questions:


On the pdf on fluid level check (shown on pg 1) it states to "be sure to turn terminals TC and TE1 off" to check fluid level, if terminals are on fluid level cannot be precisely adjusted due to fluctuations in idle speed"...…...is this the same thing as saying you need to pull paperclip on method without techstream? (pdf pg 3 in thread).

Once fluid temp detection mode is entered and D comes on for 2 sec in neutral, you are supposed to shift into P. I assume D light go off at this point because in detection mode D is off at below 115 and on at 115-133. So D would need to go off until 115 is reached.
 
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