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Hello!

I just picked up my 07 tundra SR5 DC it has 152k.

I followed the directions here and the truck still drives! I shorted draining out about two quarts, but I'm ok with that. I was just afraid to run out of fluid. I also used the top oil cooler barb instead of the connection at the thermostat. At first I was worried about how fast it would come pumping out since I was by myself but after the first gallon, I would bet it was about a gallon per minute. Plenty of time to walk around and shut off the truck.



New vs Old

I used borrow a Scangauge from my other car and used these X-Gauge:



I plan on doing this again at 182k. Valvoline Maxlife ATF used. 3 gallons.

-Carl
 

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A DIY video would be awesome and extremely helpful for visual guys like myself. If anyone happens to do one, thank you very much in advance.
I just did a change and video taped it. After reading your comment and searching myself I didn't find anything either and I need some Adobe Premiere practice...


One problem I found is that this thread mentions doing the ATF level check at 115-133F as it says in the 2007 TSB. But my 2009 Service Manual says 99-111F (which is a near cold engine). I don't know if it's already been mentioned and I just missed it but for people doing it based off IR thermometers or the ATF temp gauge position you may need to re-adjust your levels.
 

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There is a very good video about Toyota Dipstick free transmissions on youtube. If you are at all interested in the topic you should watch this. Warning it is too long and the guy talks too much, but he is a professor of autotech and probably know a thing or two. He demonstrates the usage of a SST that allows fluid checking at any temperature. Makes me kinda wonder about draining a gallon, replace a gallon. At a minimum, anytime the transmission fluid is added/removed, the level should be checked following the procedure outlined above in this thread, using the proper temperature for your particular vehicle. It is possible that the system is calibrated that the "D" would only be on solid if the fluid temp is proper for the vehicle. This would mean the vehicle has everything necessary to check/adjust fluid level (minus the paper clip).Checking the fluid should address any temperature related volume differences in draining "warm" fluid and replacing with "cold". Click here for fluid check procedure, linked for reference

I guess this is like the cereal box , "sold by weight, not volume, some settling of contents may occur" LOL!

May be fun to take a quart and heat it on the stove and quantify the fluid expansion.

 

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Hey guys, long time lurker here, figured I'd finally pipe up with a question/thought. I've read this thread several times now and am wondering if a slightly modified procedure would work. I used it on my other truck with a lot of success and I think it may work for this but I'm open for comments and suggestions .

1. Acquire a 5 gallon bucket, Mark a line on the 3 gallons (either by filling it with 3 gallons first or by any other method you see fit)

2. disconnect the tranny cooler outlet and run and appropriate length of vinyl tubing into a the 5 gallon bucket

3. Remove the tranny fill plug in route vinyl tubing up in to the engine compartment ending it with a funnel.

4. Pin the trans thermostat in the open position ( if applicable)

5. Have a friend start the engine and every so often run through the gears
5a. While this is going on the transmission will begin pumping fluid into the aforementioned bucket
5b. Simultaneously begin adding fluid at a slow rate to the funnel.

6. Have said friend turn the engine off when the fluid leaving the transmission reaches the mark you placed on the bucket .

7. Continue adding fluid until you have court in the exact same 3 gallons

8. Remove the vinyl tubing and reconnect the cooler line and install the fill plug and remove The pin from the thermostat

9. Use the Toyota procedure to check the fluid level


So is this crazy thinking?
 

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So basically swapping out the fluid in one continuous motion, instead of in "batches"?

I don't see any reason it won't work, just a couple concerns you have to watch.

1st, the engine pumps out the fluid with some decent amount of flow. Even though you can get a wider diameter of the vinyl tube into into the filler of hole you're relying on on the gravity to to move viscous cold fluid back into the the people transmission. It may pump up out faster than than it can fill.

2nd, is if the transmission sump empties because it sucks out faster than you fill it you may get air in the system. Since there isn't an air bleed procedure I think the system purges trapped air on its own but I'd still check the fluid again a after driving a bit incase you had some trapped air from the change come out later.

Earlier in this thread people considered dunking the vinyl fill tube in a bucket of good fluid to siphon fluid into the system. From the way the system works I don't don't think this is possible. The fluid uptake is immersed halfway into the sump and sucks up fluid like a straw.

Imagine you have a glass of water stick a straw hallway down and start sucking water out. If you pour water in at the same rate you're fine. But if you suck the water out faster than it goes back in, then when the water level drops below the bottom of the straw you start gurgling as you suck in air.

Sent from my SHIELD Tablet using Tapatalk
 

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I am looking for some confirmation but didn't want to start another thread, given it is inline with this one. I am preparing to do an ATF swap using the video from Kerensky97. This is a very good instructional video. I purchased the Amsoil fluid and want to be sure my transmission temps are correct. I have been searching to find that many transmissions are running cooler than mine. I have a 2007 5.7L CM and tow my race cars around in the summer and daily drive in the winter, to combat the WV snow.

Anyway, I found information (there are several threads when searching) regarding how to setup the scangaugeII or the torque app. I purchased the cheaper application for my android and am wondering if my readings are consistent with others.

I am using the following settings to setup my application, for a custom PID: (a thread by charlier used 2182 with variables A&B and C&D, but it would not work to get a reading....so I used the following)

For sensor 1 (Pan Temp):
OBD2 Mode and PID: 21d9
Long Name: Transmission Fluid Temperature 1
Short Name: TFT
Minimum Value: 0.0
Maximum value: 300.0
Scale factor: x1
Unit Type: °F
Equation: ((((E*256)+F) * (7/100) – 400)/10)
OBD Header to use: left blank

For sensor 2 (Converter outlet temp):
OBD2 Mode and PID: 21d9
Long Name: Transmission Fluid Temperature 2
Short Name: TFT2
Minimum Value: 0.0
Maximum value: 300.0
Scale factor: x1
Unit Type: °F
Equation: ((((G*256)+H) * (7/100) – 400)/10)
OBD Header to use: left blank


With these settings, and disabling faster communication on my OBDII bluetooth device, I can get readings. Here are some examples:



This was idling in my driveway after driving 25 miles home...you can see the max readings. The min readings were due to me plugging in and turning on the app at a stop light. The max readings appear higher than others, during my search. Thoughts?

I let the Tundra cool for 4.5 hours in the driveway and went back out to see what the readings were...



And here is the OEM guage reading:


I want to be sure that I can collect correct temps to correctly replace my fluid. Any input or advice is appreciated.

Thank you.
 
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A quick update. I was able to start my Tundra in my garage (high 60's degrees) and back out into my driveway of 55-57 degree drive into work. Here are my temps:

TFT (supposedly the pan)
- Lowest: 68.6
- Highest: 199.7

TFT2 (supposedly the converter)
- Lowest: 73.1
- Highest: 221.0

For reference, Engine coolant temp
- Lowest: 73.4
- Highest: 195.8

---------------------------------------------------------

Today was a bit warmer, in the upper 60's ambient temp on my way home after a meeting. The Tundra was not started cold but still had some temp from driving over to the meeting approximately 2.5 hours previously

TFT (supposedly the pan)
- Lowest: 122.4
- Highest: 206.4
- Pulled into driveway at 204.2
- Ran an average of 199.4 rolling down the interstate at a steady rate

TFT2 (supposedly the converter)
- Lowest: 132.5
- Highest: 227.7
- Pulled into the driveway at 225.4

For reference, Engine coolant temp
- Lowest: 131
- Highest: 195.8
- Pulled into driveway at 192.2

---------------------------------------------------------

I really like being able to monitor these temps but I need someone to please comment on the values that are seen. I need to know that the numbers generated are valid and I can use them to check the level of my fluid correctly. I am planning to use the TFT (Pan sensor) for the fluid temp for the change, correct? Input and confirmation desired.

Thank you.
Chadrick
 
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I just did a change and video taped it. After reading your comment and searching myself I didn't find anything either and I need some Adobe Premiere practice...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fLVZSoKbyZ0

One problem I found is that this thread mentions doing the ATF level check at 115-133F as it says in the 2007 TSB. But my 2009 Service Manual says 99-111F (which is a near cold engine). I don't know if it's already been mentioned and I just missed it but for people doing it based off IR thermometers or the ATF temp gauge position you may need to re-adjust your levels.
Different tranny models have different temps for level check.
 

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So I finally did the fluid change, and it went well. A couple of points, I used a 3/4" OD and 5/8" ID hose to feed the tranny. This fit my tranny funnel perfectly but was too big to go inside the fill point. I ended up having to taper the hose. I'd say 1/2" would be probably the biggest that would fit the fill hole.

I also used the "non techstream" method for the tranny temp, whereby the shift indicator uses the "D" light to show the temperature (by being off, steady or flashing). Worked great. I measured the pan temperature with a IR temp gun when the temperature was correct, and there was a signifcant difference in the pan vs fluid temperature so I wouldn't recomment using an IR temp gun for accurate temps. Below are the instructions I used:

View attachment 28513

I also disconnected the cooler line at the cooler, which was much easier than doing so under the truck. I just pulled the top line, connected a 3/8" line to the cooler barb and it pumped out perfectly. It's easier than being under the truck (unless you have a hoist).

With 12 Litres of Toyota WS, the tranny shifts better than ever. The old stuff was due for a change.

Absolutely use this method for getting the temperature correct before checking fluid level. The other Toyota PDF does not have this paperclip jumper method noted, whereby you don't need the tech stream method or an IR temp gun. I was surprised how the pan temp was just warm to the touch when the fluid was the correct temp. It was barely registering on my temp gauge when it was already at the correct temp. Soon it was too warm, and temp gauge was not yet on the second tic mark. Worked great on my 2012 Tundra. Make sure you follow the directions precisely to get it into the temperature test mode, keeping brake pedal in, etc. Took me a few tries to get it into the mode.
 

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07 sport appearance pkg

My 07 "Sport Appearance" pkg Tundra does not have the towing pkg. It didn't come with a hitch, rear step bumper, trailer brake controller or trans cooler that I'm aware of. I installed a class 3 hitch and a trailer brake controller. I had to pull a hot lead for the "break away" trailer brakes, since the harness didn't have one, even though it was plug & play for the 7 pin adaptor other than that. My concern is tranny temp. I want to hook up a trans temp gauge to monitor while towing. The gauge fits perfectly in the dash recess that is used for the 4wd switch or the coin holder on my 2wd truck. I was looking for a place to put the sender but found no cooler lines. I did come across a big disc shaped thing on the passenger side of the trans that looks like it's plumbed to large diameter lines, probably engine coolant? It looks like these lines go to the front cover of the engine and firewall (heater core)? I'm guessing that I may have to weld/braze a fitting to the pan for the trans ga temp sender unless there is some other way to accomplish this. I know this is probably not a very common use for one of these sport appearance trucks but It has the power and the strength of drivetrain and suspension to tow my 4000 lb car on a 2000 lb trailer with a full load in the box as well. I have not seen the engine temp gauge go anywhere over the normal range when doing this, (even in hot weather). I think it's better to know the trans temp that to guess what it is from the other gauge on the dash. Any suggestions would be appreciated.
 

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I drain exactly one gallon out and put the plug back in quickly. Than I just put 4 quarts of genuine toyota WS tranny fluid back in.
I also keep things simple. I see no point breaking down the pan and filter unless the fluid shows signs of extreme wear. Toyota does not have a change interval on the ATF filter, do they? If they do, please advise!

The only thing different is that I drop in 5 new quarts (pumped from a clean 5qt oil container) after draining only the pan of 4qts-ish. That way I know I'm a little overfilled so when I pull the level bolt at operating temp I know the level is spot on.

I do this annually. Takes 30 minutes. Changing just one differential takes as long!
 

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I also keep things simple. I see no point breaking down the pan and filter unless the fluid shows signs of extreme wear. Toyota does not have a change interval on the ATF filter, do they? If they do, please advise!

The only thing different is that I drop in 5 new quarts (pumped from a clean 5qt oil container) after draining only the pan of 4qts-ish. That way I know I'm a little overfilled so when I pull the level bolt at operating temp I know the level is spot on.

I do this annually. Takes 30 minutes. Changing just one differential takes as long!
I like that method. Seems simple enough and a good "routine" maintenance rather than doing one big job down the road. Is adding a whole quart more than what you dumped out too much though? Would that, over time, cause there to be too much fluid in the system after a few drain/fill changes? I'm going to do this soon and was thinking maybe just dump 4 and add 4.5.

Also, is this the fluid you used:
https://www.amazon.com/Genuine-Toyota-Automatic-Transmission-Standard/dp/B00CTUSEMU/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_product_top?ie=UTF8
 

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I like that method. Seems simple enough and a good "routine" maintenance rather than doing one big job down the road. Is adding a whole quart more than what you dumped out too much though? Would that, over time, cause there to be too much fluid in the system after a few drain/fill changes? I'm going to do this soon and was thinking maybe just dump 4 and add 4.5.

Also, is this the fluid you used:
https://www.amazon.com/Genuine-Toyota-Automatic-Transmission-Standard/dp/B00CTUSEMU/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_product_top?ie=UTF8
Overtime, if you never pulled the "level" plug, yes it very likely the fluid level would reach a point you would have some sort of significant problem.

And yes, that's the very case from Amazon of WS ATF I purchased this year. Personally, I am not one to use anything but OEM ATF.
 

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Thanks for the write up, finally did mine today on my 07. Fluid was not that bad looking but needed to be done, plan on twice a year changing the pan fluid now to keep it fresh.
 

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We bought this truck (2011 Tundra 5.7 w/ tow package) so we could buy a travel trailer. We have found a travel trailer and are bring it home this week.
My question is about the ATF return line. Let me ask my question this way... If I'm laying on my back on the ground, looking up at the transmission thermostat, which hose is the ATF return line?
Thanks.
 

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We bought this truck (2011 Tundra 5.7 w/ tow package) so we could buy a travel trailer. We have found a travel trailer and are bring it home this week.
My question is about the ATF return line. Let me ask my question this way... If I'm laying on my back on the ground, looking up at the transmission thermostat, which hose is the ATF return line?
Thanks.
For me there seemed to be more room to do the cooler flush portion closer to the radiator/cooler. I labeled the hoses, I'll get a picture....if I ever get my truck back from (dent) repair.
 

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My 07 "Sport Appearance" pkg Tundra does not have the towing pkg. It didn't come with a hitch, rear step bumper, trailer brake controller or trans cooler that I'm aware of. I think it's better to know the trans temp that to guess what it is from the other gauge on the dash. Any suggestions would be appreciated.
If your considering a ATF temp monitor here is one idea to consider.
https://www.omega.com/pptst/SA1-RTD.html

This can be mounted at your location of choice and run the rtd cables to your instrument.

You also have this option as well.
https://www.automationdirect.com/adc/Overview/Catalog/Sensors_-z-_Encoders/Temperature_Sensors_-a-_Transmitters/RTD_(PT100)_Sensors/Sensors_(Bolt-on_Ring)
 
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