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I’m new to this site,looks like this is an old post but I’m almost convinced I can actually service my own transmission
 

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Answer your questions. Yes pull paperclip and yes d will go out. Thanks for the add. I went to lowes and got the 2 gal paint bucket with quart intervals. Did it 2 qts at a time
 

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Thinking about doing this myself. Not because it cost that much more to have it done. I just don't know if I trust the dealer to do it.

Rockauto has the AISIN ATF0WS fluid for a good price.

These are AISIN made trannies that use to come out of an Aisin plant in Durham NC. Not sure if they still do or not but I suspect they do.

What you guys think of the the Aisin ATF0WS fluid?
 

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I got ws fluid for 7 a qt. I used 12 qts. Heard maxlife is good but also ws fluid is proven to go over 400k
Some have lost trannies on Maxlife. I don't want to take the chance.

Fluid life is all about conditions and who is driving how....

Where did you get WS for 7$ a quart? Thanks
 

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Also, what about the "ATF THERMAL DEGRADATION ESTIMATE RESET" if more than 50 percent of the fluid has been replaced.

What exact does reseting the estimate with techstream do?
 

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Also, what about the "ATF THERMAL DEGRADATION ESTIMATE RESET" if more than 50 percent of the fluid has been replaced.



What exact does reseting the estimate with techstream do?


I question how accurate it is, my truck has 30k on it currently. At about 20k I bought a techstream cable and used the software. I noticed at that time the atf thermal degradation estimate number was maxed out at 65535. I reset it because I wanted to see how fast it climbed, with roughly 10k more since zeroing the atf degradation estimate I am already maxed back out at the 65535 number, I did check periodically during this time frame and it was a steady climb back up. It seems 65535 is the highest it goes.

On a warm weekend coming up I plan to do a transmission fluid exchange and will reset the estimate again at that time.

I do occasionally haul a trailer but never anything over 7k and I would say less than 10% of my miles are with trailer.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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After 126,949 miles, I thought it would be a good idea to change my transmission fluid for the 1st time. I should have done it sooner. A relative had a tranny fail on their auto and it made me realize that I’d never changed my fluid. I did tow for about 1,000 miles, but that was much earlier in the trucks life. I researched for weeks using mainly this thread (specifically toyturbodiesel’s 1st post), but every other one I could find on other forums and YouTube videos also.
My Tundra is a 2008 double cab 4WD.

Here is what I learned.
Tools required: 14mm socket for drain plug, 24mm socket for fill plug, allen wrench (I think 5mm, but not sure) for fluid level check plug, Phillips screwdriver for hose clamp on tranny cooler line, standard screwdriver to push in the valve on the thermostat, paperclip to hold thermostat valve open, pliers to loosen existing clamp on same tranny cooler line, floor jack, one jack stand, funnel, 3/8” tubing, 1/2” tubing, drain pan with level markers, 5 gallon bucket, rubber bands & twist ties to hold funnel in place, clamp to hold end of hose in drain pan, ~4” length of thin gauge copper wire, 12 quarts WS fluid.
I got the fluid off eBay for $82.68 (less 15% eBay coupon) + $20.01 shipping = $90.29 delivered.

It was difficult to find a drain pan with level marks on it. I read that someone bought one at Lowes. I went to Lowes, Home Depot, Harbor Freight and Walmart. None of them had one. Finally picked one up for $3 at Auotzone.

One thing I found confusing is that some refer to the automatic transmission fluid as “oil”. I don’t. Motor oil is for the engine. Automatic transmission fluid is for the transmission.

I could have squeezed under my truck without jacking it up, but it would have been painfully uncomfortable. I jacked up the passenger side and supported it with a jack stand. I removed the fill plug, loosened the level check plug and then removed the drain plug. Engine was cold. I read differing accounts of how much fluid comes out when removing the drain plug. Everywhere from 2 – 4 quarts. I had 4 quarts come out and it was still trickling out until I lowered the jack. I guess only 2 quarts come out if you don’t jack up the side? After draining, I put the drain plug back in.
I pushed the valve in on the thermostat with a standard screwdriver and inserted a paperclip to hold it open.
I removed the tranny cooler line from the top of the vehicle (you need the pliers to squeeze open the crimp that holds the hose in place) and attached my ½” hose with a standard hose clamp. I had leaks here every cycle. I suggest you use 2 hose clamps. I also suggest you unwind your hose days before attempting this. I bought 10’ of each diameter hose at Lowes and it came coiled in a tight circle. This was a pain in the ass as it didn’t want to uncoil. You only need about 5’ – 6’ of each hose.

Filled 4 quarts of the new stuff through the 3/8” hose. I used the rubber bands and long twist ties to hold the funnel to my brake fluid reservoir. Some say they used ½” tube for this. Some said ½” was too large. I didn’t try to force the ½” hose in the fill port, but I did hold the end of the hose up to the plug and it looked damn close. If ½” does fit, it must be a tight squeeze.

I started the truck and let fluid flow out into my drain pan, then filled with the same amount that came out. I did this 3 times, while shifting through all the gears while it was draining. 1 = ~3 quarts, 2= ~2.5 quarts, 3 = ~2.25 quarts. Total = ~11.75 quarts.

Now I reconnected the tranny cooler hose and tried using a paper clip to jump terminals 4 & 13 on the OBDII port. This was a bit confusing. The terminals don’t have numbers on them. Make sure you are using the right ones. I had it wrong as the picture I was using was oriented upside down. Just make sure you think about it before you go jamming paper clips up in there. After I was sure I had the correct 2 terminals, I still couldn’t get the truck to go into the tranny temp detection mode. A pulled out the paper clip and used a regular copper wire. The first wire I grabbed was too big and wouldn’t fit in the hole (Yes, that’s what she said). I had to go get another smaller gauge wire and life was good.

Engage parking brake. After getting to the right temp, I quickly opened the level check plug and no fluid drained out. Added last 0.25 quarts and repeat. It started overflowing out. Cap it off, pull paperclip out of thermostat, remove wire from OBDII port, put fill plug back in and done.
At least in my mind, the truck shifts smoother than before.

Several small details here that I never read in my research.
 

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I just did the flush today. Worked out perfect. I got some clear hose at Home Depot for the fill.
 

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My spreadsheet below is extremely detailed, but that's how I like to roll when I am expecting problems. I definitely expect to be breaking at least 6 bolts on the tranny pan (because I was able to easily remove 6 with reasonable hand torque). Hoping to only break 2-3 when all is said and done. This is my spreadsheet specifically geared toward filter change and full fluid flush on a 2012 5.7 tundra 4x4 (AB60F transmission). Full instructions (and I included pictures from the actual Toyota manual too).

For those that appreciate detail, I thought this might be helpful.


Of particular note is the McMaster-Carr bolts and washers that I obtained to replace the stock ones. They are rated with extreme corrosion resistance and my test of just letting one sit outside through rainstorms (along with other standard M6 x 1.0 bolts) has proven to be quite amazing. For those reading this far - NEVER use stainless bolts in this location. I saw someone in this thread somewhere saying they got stainless bolts. HUGE no-no. It sounds good ... however, stainless and aluminum will bond themselves together over time (galvanic corrosion). Guaranteed to never be able to take them out if you use stainless :)
 

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In case anyone is interested in how this one turned out ...

Snapped off 6 out of the 12 bolts. For the most part - it was the front bolts that came out and the rears that did not. And keep in mind that this is with 3-4 soaks of both PB Blaster and Liquid Wrench across an entire week. I also tapped on each bolt with a punch several times to shock it a bit. All of the six that broke, snapped off at the head. I have some great pics, lol. Maybe I’ll post them later. Interestingly, I believe that the metal spacer in the rubber gasket is at least partially to blame for this - if not the major culprit.

Definitely one of the more difficult jobs I’ve completed. BUT - She’s done and back on the road.

Three of the protruding studs came out with a lot of frustration ... and vice grips clamped super tight at the base. Slow wiggle back and forth. The other three sheared off at the case when using the same method. 1 eventually came out the back end after I drilled a hole through it and then swapped to a bigger bit. That left 2. Those two would take the majority of the effort. 1 decided to have a drill bit break off in the bolt. Luckily I had already got a 1/16” bit through the bolt so I used another 1/16” bit (cut off) as a punch and punched from the backside. About 2 mm of the larger bit came out of the surface ... just enough to grab onto it with some needle nose and wiggle out. Ugh. After finishing the drilling, I retapped the hole and somehow it was good to go. The last hole wasn’t as nice. To skip to the solution, drilled it extra big (too big for a heli-coil, filled with JB Weld, drilled and tapped the JB Weld, and used a longer bolt. The bolt torqued up to 45in-lbs just fine (which was plenty to compress the gasket and clamp the metal gasket spacer (stock torque setting is 65). That said - this was on a rear corner so I used a larger washer, lock washer, and nut on the top of the case just to be sure ;-) :).

Then it was on to the flush and check procedure. Went through about 15 qts of Toyota WS fluid. No dipstick for this transmission. Fluid was dark at 115k (no trailer pulling). The check procedure using Kiwi, OBD Fusion, and my iPhone was simple and straight forward.

Oh - and just to clarify yet again for all ...
The filter is not a screen or a strainer. It’s definitely paper/cloth-ish.
The magnets definitely had the normal fuzz coating. No big chunks. Was super happy that I could get in there and clean them up.

Ugh. But done. PRAISE TO GOD. He kept me sane and took care of me the whole way. 🙏🏼
 

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Doesnt the tundra have a drain plug?
Of course it does. But, you can't remove the filter, install the new one, and clean the 4 magnets ... through a drain plug hole. You'd have to remove the pan to do all of that.

Now - if you're only goal is to replace the fluid ... you'll be fine.
 

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Of course it does. But, you can't remove the filter, install the new one, and clean the 4 magnets ... through a drain plug hole. You'd have to remove the pan to do all of that.

Now - if you're only goal is to replace the fluid ... you'll be fine.
Gotcha. Thank you
 

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Before you begin there is a pdf file on this and other sites that shows the proper Toyota method of checking the fluid level. This will obviously have to be completed after you have changed the fluid.

First you will drain the fluid in the transmission that is collected in the pan using the rear most drain plug, I believe it's a 12mm. I used a 4 gal bucket to catch the fluid. I marked a line on the bucket that shows the 1 gal mark. As it turned out the pan holds just a bit more than 1 gal.

After draining the fluid in the pan put the plug back in. ON the drivers side of the tranny there is a fill plug, 24mm. Take that plug off and snake a hose down the engine bay into this plug. Attach a suitable funnel onto the top of the hose. Put 1 gal of new fluid into the tranny to replace the fluid you just took out.

Referring to the Toyota fluid check instructions you will see that there is a thermostat that controls the fluid to the tranny cooler. Push the end in and insert a pin to lock the thermostat in the open position. You want the fluid to circulate through the cooler so it is flushed also. You have to do this to check the fluid later anyway. if your truck has no cooler just follow the instructions from Toyota.

The return line is the line that is on the bottom as it feeds into the thermostat housing. I disconnected the hose on the end opposite the thermostat toward the cooler there is a hard line. You can see it on the picture. I used an old Toyota tranny cooler line i had laying around. Place the open end in the bucket and have someone start the truck. Fluid will flow from the line into the bucket filling a gal in about 40 seconds or so. I just watched till it was close then yell to turn the truck off. Put another gal of fluid in the tranny. Repeat two more times. The last gal you put in won't require all of it, I put in all but a pint or so. if theres a bit too much it's not a huge issue.

Now you will want to warm the fluid to the check range of 115 to 133 degs F. I have a Scan Gauge that shows tranny fluid temp, so i used that. I included a picture of the Scan Gauge and the stock tranny temp gauge so you can judge where the stock gauge will be for you. There is a procedure on the Toyota instructions where the dash will start blinking a light when the proper temp has been reached. Use whatever works for you.

At this point, remove the level plug from the tranny pan, 4MM allen I believe and let the fluid drain to a trickle then replace the plug. If you just get a splash of fluid then nothing, you need to add more fluid and try again. It should flow then slow to a trickle. I did this while the temp was just at 115F. There you have it. Be sure to remember to remove the pin from the thermostat and replace the fill plug.

Not hard at all, and you have 100% new fluid in your tranny without doing the power flush, which many believe can cause issues. I bought my truck with 100K miles on it and tow quite a bit at 8000+ lbs. In the future I'll likely just do a drain of 1 gal then replace it every other oil change to keep things fresh.

Best Regards
Ive been wanting to do this myself and think i will give it a go now. Your explanation makes more sense to me then the pdf. Gone are the simple drain and refill im used to in my other cars. I paid the dealer to do it last time but not really confident that they followed process.
Yeah I’m a tech but not for Toyota. I would not trust the dealer to do this. Let’s just say I worry about dealer techs nowadays. I think I’m gonna do it in mine.
 

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Do you have a tranny cooler? If so then the two lines are right on it. Just pop hood and look over top of it. I use top line for convenience. The hard line is what u wanna connect drain hose to.


Sent from my Autoguide iPhone app
Looks like you hooked up the old cooler line you had to the rubber side though.
 

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Yeah I’m a tech but not for Toyota. I would not trust the dealer to do this. Let’s just say I worry about dealer techs nowadays. I think I’m gonna do it in mine.
That’s crazy, I’ve had zero issues with the dealer working on anything.
 
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