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With a 4WD, you have transfer case fluids, front differential gear oil, driveshaft, and half-shafts to the wheels with CV joints with all the electronics and servo mechanisms. Overtime thats a bunch more maintenance and repair over a 2WD. I wouldn't own a truck as a daily driver without 4WD...

People keep commenting about less maintenance with 2 wheel drive but what does that mean? Nowadays the only real maintenance is greasing driveshafts (depending on model vehicle) and checking the u joints. Theres not much more maintenance than a 2 wheel drive vehicle. I've had trucks my entire life and I've had 4x4 on all of them. I watched a buddy of mine with a 2 wheel drive truck get stuck in a dirt parking lot at a concert, same lot a bunch of cars and other vehicles were parked in, he just managed to get the soft spot and because it was 2 wheel drive he couldnt get out. Much rather have 4x4 and not need it than not have it and need it. Idk why they even make 2 wheel drive trucks to be honest. Maintenance is literally turning 4x4 on like once every few months and checking to make sure the u joints aren't loose. Seems easy to me
 

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Resell is better on 4wd. Especially if you plan on keep one 10 years or more. Check out most any make and model of truck and you will see a huge difference in value. 4wd hold their value much better.

Front wheel drive is fine with 2wd. Rear wheel.... nope.
 

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I agree that 4WD is the best option for areas that get snow, but one factor I didn’t see mentioned so far is what I consider to be the main argument for 2WD: towing capacity.

2WD gets a boost in towing and hauling capacity based on the fact that it doesn’t have to haul around a transfer case, extra differential and driveshaft, to the tune of like 400 pounds hauling and something like two thousand pound towing
 

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The upfront costs vs being stuck, or towed balance out.

Maintenance isn't much unless you do anything stupid causing repair.

Front diff and T-case fluid, which one poster here has said you never have to change, so no maintenance, lol.
How much does a tow cost where you live? Usually the 4x4 adds a couple grand to the cost, you must call a helicopter when you get stuck.
 

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How much does a tow cost where you live? Usually the 4x4 adds a couple grand to the cost, you must call a helicopter when you get stuck.
A helicopter? Really?!?

My last tow was in 1998, it cost me $350 when my Mustang blew the clutch self adjuster gears.

I know people who have had trucks or equipment stuck and their bills were over 1k...

Obviously you didn't read, we were talking about maintenance. I did say up front cost, but 4x4 will bring in more residual value down the road...That is a negligible amount if you get it back, or most of it. Fluid is cheap. In 15 years of owning 4x4's, my total 4wd maintenance costs are maybe $200-$300 in fluids... I have never been stuck.


The dollars isn't the only thing. If you get stuck because it is snowy, you have kids and wife screaming at you... Or even if you have take out food that you now have to eat cold after you wait an hour for a tow truck. Money is money, time is priceless. Plus when your buddies give you shit for not buying a 4x4, say you might as well have bought a prius... Well, that's just funny.
 

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Like everyone else has said. It is a matter of personal preference and where you live. I tow my boats, RV and live where the snow and ice get bad at times. I don't use the 4x4 option often, but when I do I need it. Better to have it and not need it than need it and not have it in my opinion.
 

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I don't use the 4x4 option often, but when I do I need it. Better to have it and not need it than need it and not have it in my opinion.
That sums it up. I got by in shitty Buffalo NY for 25 yrs with 2wd and mostly Rwd. But having the option of 4wd in tough situations sure makes life easier. In my opinion, the traction control makes navigating the snow and ice easier. The 4wd has a bigger impact getting traction in the mud. I will drive a 2wd in the snow no problem. I would feel less confident in a few inches of sloppy mud with 2wd.
At the end of the day, the right tires are far more important than any other factor. Good snow tires are far more effective than M/T or A/T in snow, even if they have the silly "snowflake rating". So, you can get by with 2wd and actual snow tires just fine. Just have to change them out for summer.

Around here, the average flatbed tow is currently $75 + $4 p/mile.
Not sure what it is to pull you out of a ditch or unwrap you frim a pole. Probably more.
 
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