Toyota Tundra Discussion Forum banner
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is there anyone who tows with the 4.0 6cyl Tundra. So far I towed a small camper after wiring a 7pin and adding break control. Didn't think I'll be doing any towing after I bought it and now the wifey and I would like to go camping more often. I would like to know who else does ny towing with this model tundra.

Thanks,

Hector:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
830 Posts
You've already tried it--how did it do? I'm looking at my manual, and it says 4800lb for a DC, 5100lb for a regular cab long bed, or 5200lb for a regular cab short bed. I'd think you'd be fine up to and including a relatively large popup. A travel trailer, wih it's large wind drag, might be a different story.

If it is 3k or so in weight, I'd think about a Trans cooler; regardless I'd change the fluid more often. But up to 3k on a popup, I'm not sure I'd think twice about it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Is there anyone who tows with the 4.0 6cyl Tundra. So far I towed a small camper after wiring a 7pin and adding break control. Didn't think I'll be doing any towing after I bought it and now the wifey and I would like to go camping more often. I would like to know who else does ny towing with this model tundra.

Thanks,

Hector:D
I'd say you're fine for popups, small boats, etc. I towed my popup and run-about boat all over the southeast for 6 years with my Tacoma V6. And while it did the job fine (both weight 2500-3000 lbs) it was working through the hills especially. And after 107,000 miles total (lots of towing during the spring, summer and fall months) my Tacoma was feeling it. The last trip I made was this spring, round trip from KY to Disney Ft. Wilderness. And I was just hoping we made it home without any break downs. That's about 1800 miles round trip towing my 2500# popup and my family of 4 and it about killed my little truck. The engine had developed a miss, the tranny was jerking hard during down shifts going through the mountains and it was burning oil. I did my own maintenance on the truck, including synthetic oil changes every 6k or so. In the end I realized it's just a "light duty" hauler and what I needed was a truck designed to haul. So I got the tundra.

The Tundra will have more heavy duty drive train and should hold up longer than my Tacoma V6. Just keep in mind your towing plans and how the V6 will hold up. For lightweight popup towing, etc. I think you'll be fine, just keep it reasonable weight wise...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,869 Posts
What E-Light says is reasonable. Where you are going to run into issues is when you try to pull something that has a larger "footprint" than the truck because the drag from the wind resistance is going to kill your V6. Popup campers, smaller boats etc will be fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for everything that has been posted guys. I towed a camper that sleeps 4, about 13'. The trip was not far, approximately 60 miles, from Raeford NC to Jordan Lake State park. I installed a 7-pin adapter and break control to meet the spec requests for the place where I rented the trailer. The Tundra was loaded, the trailer was packed (my wife's first camping trip, thought we were feeding the entire campsite, lol) and it handled very well. The truck has a GVWR (stamped on side door) of 6400lbs. so for this trip I was thinking everything was covered and in fact everything went well, break control makes a big difference. I understand the wind drag can be very stressful on the engine, but fortunately our camping choices are pretty close based on where we live, either mountains or beach are a short trip away fortunately. With al of this said, we invited some friends for the next one, on memorial day and I will be towing something heavier. It will be on Memorial Day weekend. The only item I will be changing will be the hitch receiver, found one that is class IV, better design with a lot more frame support, and will be using a weight distribution hitch. Adding this changes and adjusting the break control I will find out. So far we are renting, but if we buy a trailer we will go with the new super lite models. I will let you all know how it went.

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,445 Posts
That little trailer is the upper end of what you can tow according to specs. You have to add people and stuff you carry into the equation. The truck is the same as the 5.7 but the drivetrain is not.
The Curt hitch will pull what the trailer can so going bigger won't add capacity.
I am curious how you wired the 7 pin. The factory harness? You cannot just directly attach a 7 pin to the Tundra and have it last. The factory harness kit comes in a relatively big box
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
That little trailer is the upper end of what you can tow according to specs. You have to add people and stuff you carry into the equation. The truck is the same as the 5.7 but the drivetrain is not.
The Curt hitch will pull what the trailer can so going bigger won't add capacity.
I am curious how you wired the 7 pin. The factory harness? You cannot just directly attach a 7 pin to the Tundra and have it last. The factory harness kit comes in a relatively big box
I had the wiring done by HGRS (trailers place close to work). They had to run full set of wires in order to make the brake control work. I might end up trading for a bigger size engine, lol.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,115 Posts
If you loaded your truck to GVWR AND maxed it out or even exceeded the towing limits, you need a bigger engine. the trailer doesn't play into GVWR except tongue weight.

It might be fine once a year but I wouldn't do it very often if it was a truck I planned on keeping very long.

A Bigger Camper? You might want to rent a bigger truck for that trip.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,445 Posts
The trailer weight and size does play a lot as the higher gear ratio and less power will put more strain on it. And it will wear quicker if it is done often.
Now the v6 Tundra probably has more capacity than all of the 1/2 tons up to the 90's. And they could do it, just not fast and they shortened their life.
For once a year trip, renting a bigger truck or even a C class, may be cheaper overall.
I think staying with the smallest camper you can and buy the truck you need to haul that if you camp frequently. I know guys driving duallys all year long so they can haul an oversized camper for 1 week a year.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
830 Posts
Yep, I hear you there. Seems unwise to size a vehicle for something you do once or twice a year. You're paying for it the rest of the time. Is it that important to deal with vehicle the rest of the year?

I bought my truck with the intention of getting a travel trailer, one of the smaller ones; and as contemplate all the details I'm starting to wonder two things: did I get enough truck, and do I really want so much trailer? I'm starting to wonder if I'd rather go with less trailer; the truck is oversized then, but it'd still be useful the rest of the time I think.

I just took a look at the 2013 Tundra's; it says 4,580lb curb, 6,200 GVWR, max payload of 1,485, and max trailer of 4,900lb. It doesn't give GCWR unfortunately, but I'm going to guess that, in accordance to SAE-whatever, with (the standard calls for this) 300lb in the truck you get a GCWR of 4,580+300+4,900 or 9,780lb. YMMV. [I *thought* max payload was GVWR-curb-300lb (of passengers) but that doesn't quite work out here.]

For quick runs across town, maybe up to 100miles or so, sure, go up to GCWR. Every other posting online indicates though that you really shouldn't size things out above about 80% of GCWR. Why? Safety margin. Sure, if you don't plan to go past 45mph, or have a long life engine, go for more. But why deal with the stress? In this case, AFAIK it's the same brakes, suspension etc so stopping and steering isn't the issue, it's getting out of the way, maintaining speed on hills, and not wearing the engine out prematurely.

I might not have the correct numbers, but they should be reasonably close. On a popup I'd feel more comfortable in getting close to 9k GCWR, with a travel trailer I'd probably stick to maybe 8k, maybe less. Take the curb weight (which includes a full tank of gas), add in people weight, the weight of all your stuff, and then add in trailer weight, to get GCWR. And go from there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Yep, I hear you there. Seems unwise to size a vehicle for something you do once or twice a year. You're paying for it the rest of the time. Is it that important to deal with vehicle the rest of the year?

I bought my truck with the intention of getting a travel trailer, one of the smaller ones; and as contemplate all the details I'm starting to wonder two things: did I get enough truck, and do I really want so much trailer? I'm starting to wonder if I'd rather go with less trailer; the truck is oversized then, but it'd still be useful the rest of the time I think.

I just took a look at the 2013 Tundra's; it says 4,580lb curb, 6,200 GVWR, max payload of 1,485, and max trailer of 4,900lb. It doesn't give GCWR unfortunately, but I'm going to guess that, in accordance to SAE-whatever, with (the standard calls for this) 300lb in the truck you get a GCWR of 4,580+300+4,900 or 9,780lb. YMMV. [I *thought* max payload was GVWR-curb-300lb (of passengers) but that doesn't quite work out here.]

For quick runs across town, maybe up to 100miles or so, sure, go up to GCWR. Every other posting online indicates though that you really shouldn't size things out above about 80% of GCWR. Why? Safety margin. Sure, if you don't plan to go past 45mph, or have a long life engine, go for more. But why deal with the stress? In this case, AFAIK it's the same brakes, suspension etc so stopping and steering isn't the issue, it's getting out of the way, maintaining speed on hills, and not wearing the engine out prematurely.

I might not have the correct numbers, but they should be reasonably close. On a popup I'd feel more comfortable in getting close to 9k GCWR, with a travel trailer I'd probably stick to maybe 8k, maybe less. Take the curb weight (which includes a full tank of gas), add in people weight, the weight of all your stuff, and then add in trailer weight, to get GCWR. And go from there.
This posting brings a very good point, and it is to clarify how to make much more accurate calculations for towing. I am new to this, while in the service didn't do much travel other than what uncle sam did for me, but I intend to be more active into doing things like this en enjoy more the outdoor lifestyle, but safely. Thanks!:lol5:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,962 Posts
The trailer weight and size does play a lot as the higher gear ratio and less power will put more strain on it. And it will wear quicker if it is done often.
Now the v6 Tundra probably has more capacity than all of the 1/2 tons up to the 90's. And they could do it, just not fast and they shortened their life.
For once a year trip, renting a bigger truck or even a C class, may be cheaper overall.
I think staying with the smallest camper you can and buy the truck you need to haul that if you camp frequently. I know guys driving duallys all year long so they can haul an oversized camper for 1 week a year.
And looking back even more, I remember we had a small TT when I was about 10. I would guess it was about 15-18 feet, single axle and pretty sure it didn't have it's own brakes. My dad pulled it with a '66 GMC that was kind of like an early Suburban. It had a 6 cylinder and 2 speed auto.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Well, sorry it took forever for the reply, towing went great the first time. So I did it again for memorial day weekend. I told my wife I am kicking my butt for not going with the full 5.7 litter engine model, we will see if that prompts support for future decision, lol. But I saw next to us a crew max with a fifth wheel, and I could not believe it. First of all, the crew max has a shorter bed, second fifth wheels are usually substantially heavier than regular campers. I didn't go over to talk to him, but is not the only crew max I have seen with a fifth wheel hitch receiver. What do you all think?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,869 Posts
Well, sorry it took forever for the reply, towing went great the first time. So I did it again for memorial day weekend. I told my wife I am kicking my butt for not going with the full 5.7 litter engine model, we will see if that prompts support for future decision, lol. But I saw next to us a crew max with a fifth wheel, and I could not believe it. First of all, the crew max has a shorter bed, second fifth wheels are usually substantially heavier than regular campers. I didn't go over to talk to him, but is not the only crew max I have seen with a fifth wheel hitch receiver. What do you all think?
When the CM first came out there was no 5th wheel adapters available due to the extremely short bed but now they are available and many people have them, I imagine it just pulls even better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
830 Posts
I know very little about 5th wheels, other than they tend to get pulled by 3/4 or 1 tons. IIRC they run more than the 10-15% "tongue" weight used by other trailers, which might get you into overload more quickly. If you pick a heavy one, that is -- from what I've read, 5th wheels can be easier to back up.

Bigger is always nicer. ;) I still like my smaller 4.6, as I know I'll always put far more miles on mine not-towing than towing. And, I'll never be able to back something big/heavy/long into my narrow driveway anyhow.
 

·
Read Only
Joined
·
0 Posts
I see Tundra's with 5th wheels all the time here and they love them. They have them airbagged of course though. These trucks are very good at towing. Mine is a 35' total length bumper pull and I like it alot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,893 Posts
I got the tundra because I had grown out of my FJ. Towed about 3800-4000 lbs once, was equipment on a flat trailer. Engine did fine, however when just towing my quad, having FJ full, the wind resistance alone and then everything else I realized I needed a more capable vehicle...

I am not really sure what trailer you have, do you have a model number? maybe dry weight?


All in all, the v6 has more power than older trucks did. As long as you are not passing the capacity due to the hitch weight (which I don't think with a 5000ish lb towing cap you really could) and you aren't passing the actual towing capacity or the 5k or so, you should be fine, it will not have the power to pass, or keep speed on hills, but slow and steady will likely get you there fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thanks for the input, I don't own a trailer yet, renting for now, but if we do we probably go with a hybrid. The last time.I rented it was a 28ft a slide out, dry weight was high 4k not counting full load and there adults including myself. It moved really well, having electric breaks also makes the journey safer, as well as wd hitch. We don't want to push our luck so next time we will pull a smaller one. Our favorite campsite is only about 70 miles from the house.

Sent from AutoGuide.com Free App
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top