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I'd take 480 HP 642 TQ ! Seriously, that's 2010 1 ton diesel motor torque with present day horsepower, on half the displacement!

I never thought I'd be excited about a hybrid truck, but if they build it right, you will have GOBS of low end torque which is exactly what I'm looking for. Personally, I'm not interested in a full electric, but the addition of an electric motor in combination with the torque of a twin turbos would make this thing an adrenaline fueled animal! I love my V8, but this could lure me away from it...
 
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5.7L is the best gas engine ever put into a truck. All-aluminum, quad OHC, 32 valves, variable valve timing on all valves, drive by wire, stainless headers, individual coil packs, the list just keeps going. Back in 2007 it was shocking how far ahead it was from the competition. Now it is still superior to the others. I hope the 3.5L is good and reliable, but I'm sticking with my 2008 5.7 until it dies.
 

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Why? When you can have this kind of torque and hp without all the diesel crap. Locomotives are pretty powerful and they’re a hybrid. I’ll never get the hybrid hate.
Nobody said anything about hating hybrids. I want another option.........get me now?
 

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I like the idea of a hybrid. I don't understand why they don't make all hybrids as a plugin so commuters can charge up and only need to burn much fuel when driving longer distances. I also like turbo-chargers. However, driving a smaller displacement turbo charged engine is a different experience from driving a larger displacement normally aspirated engine with similar power numbers. We should be able to choose. They can stop making the 5.7 when the number of people who choose it falls below profitable levels.
 

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IMO, the benefits of the hybrid in a truck have very little to do being able to plug in, charge up, then drive without turning on the engine. That’s called a full hybrid setup or a plug-in hybrid (technically they are different but achieve about the same thing) - like a prius. You can drive purely on battery power because the wheels are powers only by electric motors. When the battery gets low, the angry squirrels fire up and do their thing, but they only charge the battery. The gas motor in a full hybrid isn’t mechanically coupled to the vehicle drivetrain.

The hybrid system that the tundra will employ is mild
hybrid or hybrid assist. The gas motor is directly coupled to the drivetrain and is the main motivating force; it is assisted by an electric motor that produces (speculatively) less than 80 HP and about 150 lb-ft. Sure, you could lope around like a geezer for a bit, but that’s not nearly enough power to be the main power factor in a full size truck.

As I understand it, the hybrid assist electric motor will be there for two main scenarios: one, to provide instant torque off the line for the second it takes for the turbos to spool up, at which point the turbos light and propel the truck; and two, for heavy throttle applications such as towing where either peak power is required for relatively short bursts like climbing a hill, or for low end torque augmentation suck as towing a trailer on the freeway in the wind where the motor would normally hunt between two gears.

Now, since this is a hybrid, that battery will only last so long before the engine needs to recharge it. So I will be interested to see how Toyota handles the second scenario above. The gas motor alone makes about 480 TQ, which is no slouch. And it will make it down low. So how long that additional torque can be maintained is of interest to me.

And maybe Toyota will surprise us and allow the electric motor to putter around town for a bit without the gas motor firing up. But I honestly don’t care about that for my application. That’s where the full electric tundra slated for about a year for now has irks niche. IMO, adding a start stop feature to hybrid assist would add more complexity to what should be a simple, reliable system. It works great for the full hybrid since the gas engine is t coupled to the drivetrain. But I don’t like driving the current vehicles with start stop built in and almost everybody I know disables it because it drives them nuts. But I also don’t live where traffic can be 30 minutes or 5 hours to travel 30 miles, depending on the time of day. Been there. Hated it.
 
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@Geezer - just noticed that I inadvertently used yoir screen name in my comments above. Wasn’t pointing any fingers. Haha.
 

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I sold my 2019 and have a 2022 on order. I am undecided on the Hybrid. I am in the dark as to how the turbo spools while the work is being done by the electric motor. I have played with Grand Nationals, Syclones and Typhoon. We generally had to load them to build boost or use a shot of NO2 to get the turbo to spin. At the strip we would have one foot on the brake the other on the gas and watch the boost build. I don't understand how the Hybrid will build boost if the electric bell housing motor is helping out. I would really like to give the Hybrid a try. Just need to understand it a bit more. Would appreciate any info.
 

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From what I understand, when you punch the throttle the electric motor just assists with that initial low rpm, low speed torque gap. The gas engine is still coupled to the transmission and both the electric motor and gas engine sit before the torque converter. Even assisted, the gas engine is spinning and gaining RPM; higher RPM and higher load mean more exhaust which translates to more boost. But high boost isn’t required to make big power like the older grand nationals, Syclones, etc. which were much less efficient designs - both the engine and turbo setup.

There are a plethora of ways to manage boost such as variable vane impellers, dual inlet turbos (GM is using this on one of their little 1/2 engines and feeding half the cylinders to each inlet side; this means less volume to pressurize so faster spooling), etc. At a drag strip, you are going for big top end power which usually means big turbos - bigger than ought to be on that engine. Big turbos have a larger inlet (and exhaust outlet) volume, so you end up standing on the brake to load the motor or tickling it with a shot of laughing gas. Engine speed, though, isn’t enough to adequately spool over size or inefficient turbos. It requires a lot less fuel to rev an unloaded motor, and since the igniting fuel is what causing the gas (not gasoline, but gas as in one of the states of matter) to expand, that how you make boost. The expanding volume of gasses is what spins the turbo and is the only way that you can get a turbo to pump more air than ambient pressure (otherwise you would be creating energy which according to the laws of thermodynamics is impossible). Normal engine speeds and load are insufficient to pack the chamber with exhaust gasses before the flow out the exhaust, especially on what are typically less efficient ratio turbos.

in a street car, however, you want boost as soon as possible without restricting air flow on the top end. Toyota should be able to fit properly sized turbos for the engine to manage quick boost and air flow. Given the power figures for the 3.5TT, it’s only boosting to 10 psi or so, which suggest an efficient turbo and engine setup that doesn’t require high boost to light off the engine. The ferd eco boost by comparison, boosts somewhere between 13 and 16 psi to make the same-ish power from the same displacement. I had an older VW Passat 1.8t that made just less than 1hp/cc and pushed 18 psi with zero mods (hit 20 psi a few times). The new tundra should make 1.1hp/cc on almost half the boost.

Im still excited to see and drive one in person. Might have one follow me home…
 

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From what I understand, when you punch the throttle the electric motor just assists with that initial low rpm, low speed torque gap. The gas engine is still coupled to the transmission and both the electric motor and gas engine sit before the torque converter. Even assisted, the gas engine is spinning and gaining RPM; higher RPM and higher load mean more exhaust which translates to more boost. But high boost isn’t required to make big power like the older grand nationals, Syclones, etc. which were much less efficient designs - both the engine and turbo setup.

There are a plethora of ways to manage boost such as variable vane impellers, dual inlet turbos (GM is using this on one of their little 1/2 engines and feeding half the cylinders to each inlet side; this means less volume to pressurize so faster spooling), etc. At a drag strip, you are going for big top end power which usually means big turbos - bigger than ought to be on that engine. Big turbos have a larger inlet (and exhaust outlet) volume, so you end up standing on the brake to load the motor or tickling it with a shot of laughing gas. Engine speed, though, isn’t enough to adequately spool over size or inefficient turbos. It requires a lot less fuel to rev an unloaded motor, and since the igniting fuel is what causing the gas (not gasoline, but gas as in one of the states of matter) to expand, that how you make boost. The expanding volume of gasses is what spins the turbo and is the only way that you can get a turbo to pump more air than ambient pressure (otherwise you would be creating energy which according to the laws of thermodynamics is impossible). Normal engine speeds and load are insufficient to pack the chamber with exhaust gasses before the flow out the exhaust, especially on what are typically less efficient ratio turbos.

in a street car, however, you want boost as soon as possible without restricting air flow on the top end. Toyota should be able to fit properly sized turbos for the engine to manage quick boost and air flow. Given the power figures for the 3.5TT, it’s only boosting to 10 psi or so, which suggest an efficient turbo and engine setup that doesn’t require high boost to light off the engine. The ferd eco boost by comparison, boosts somewhere between 13 and 16 psi to make the same-ish power from the same displacement. I had an older VW Passat 1.8t that made just less than 1hp/cc and pushed 18 psi with zero mods (hit 20 psi a few times). The new tundra should make 1.1hp/cc on almost half the boost.

Im still excited to see and drive one in person. Might have one follow me home…
Thank you for the very informative reply.
My thought is a twin turbo set up will use turbos that are different sizes. One a smaller quicker spool and a larger one to compliment it a higher load.
I am trying to get excited about the Hybrid. I think the 3.5 is an amazing engine and with a few tricks (at tad more boost) the V6 can reliably provide the same power as the hybrid.
My Buick was a 3.8. Attached is what you can do with 30psi of boost. It stopped making horsepower at the point that the timing chain let go.
Pistons meet the valves LOL
 

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Nice! Except for the part where pistons got in a fight with the valves… That’s no good. Hopefully they didn’t bring the block in the brawl. That’s when it really turns in to a party.. But I guess it’s a good time for high flow heads.

I’d venture a guess that the twin turbos on the tundra will be variable geometry units - one for each bank - rather than a compound setup. But that’s purely speculation. And a compound setup would be pretty sweet. But if memory serves, compounds usually make for a a lot more mid range and top end power than a pair of smaller twins.
 

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I put a deposit down when I sold my 2019 in August. The dealer called today to see if if I had been following the release. He mentioned the Hybrid will likely be delayed until March. I didn't really want a crew cab so that helped me decide on double cab SR5 red with the TRD sport package. Will wait for the pricing and see if there are any other options I might need.
Interesting...but slightly off topic. Most if not all of the Rav Primes are being shipped to our eastern provinces where they are giving incentives which pretty much negate the added cost of going Hybrid.
I wonder if that might happen with the Tundras?
 

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That is interesting.. I wonder if the tundra would qualify since it isn’t a “full” hybrid. But, then again , if it says hybrid it might qualify anyhow. Personally, I couldn’t care less if they even called it a hybrid or not. As Mr Sweers explained - after experimenting with virtually every drivetrain type available to them (diesel, hydrogen cell, full hybrid, etc) they settled on the electric motor assist (almost) purely for “diesel-like torque” when combined with the small turbo motor. He noted that because of certain somebodies (idiot coal rollers COUGH and VW DIESLEGATE COUGH) the US changed their diesel certification program to a 3 year process.

Keep us posted as to what your dealer has to say about pricing and availability and such. Stateside, I’m sure it will be a little different but I’m I’m not too far from the great white [frozen] north. One of the other bits of info I want to see is a dyno graph with a nice fat torque curve. I don’t see anything wrong with the “base” TTv6.
 

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I think the Tundras could get the same rebates out west if there was a prime version available. I am not even sure if they will offer a prime version since a full electric is planned. I'm in BC and yeah the rebates aren't as great as some of the Eastern provinces but it is something. From what i understand there has to be a plug in component correct? Hybrids don't get a rebate.

I have a 2020 on a 4 year lease. By next March I will have 2 years left. When the pricing and more news gets released in terms of options I'll decide to trade it. Don't get me wrong, I love my 2020 but the majority of my driving is in the city so a hybrid option is great. Prime would be the best of all worlds since I do long trips and head out into nature away from people I wouldn't have to worry about running out of juice. I still use the truck to haul materials for reno and stuff so the payload and increased towing specs are welcomed.

Pretty excited about the new model! Rode in an F150 with the 3.5L ecoboost and that truck hauls! Fully loaded bed and 5 passengers, it didn't struggle. It was smooth and quiet. Genuinely impressed.
 

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I'll probably wait a year or two to make sure the engine is solid and for the other new electronics to get the bugs out. the 5.7L has and always been reliable. The front grill imo, is damn ugly. hopefully, there will be a better design in the future or at least a 3rd party grill that is aesthetically pleasing. I'd most likely go for the crewmax with the 6.5ft bed i've been getting a offers for my '18 crewmax but still planning on holding on to it until the latest generation is proven to be solid enough for me to make the switch.
 
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