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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
2017 F150 3.5 Ecoboost vs 2008 Tundra

2017 F150 3.5 Ecoboost vs 2008 Tundra

For little over a week (9 days) I was in a rental while my Tundra was being repaired (accident damage). The rental I was given was a 2017 Ford F-150 3.5 V6 Ecoboost . To get into the particulars, the F150 was a supercrew 2WD XLT with the colum shifter so there was seating for 3 up front and of course 3 in the backseat. It rode on the factory 18 inch alloy wheels with Michelin highway tires.

First the F150 backseat has plenty of space similar to the Tundra Crewmax. I have a 2008 Crewmax so there's plenty of space underneath and behind the backseat in the Tundra, as I have things stored both underneath and behind the rear seat. Likewise in the F150, underneath the backseat the floor is flat so there plenty of space to store anything underneath the backseat. The F150 rear seats, like the 2014+ Tundra rear seats, lift up. In this XLT model I had there was no storage compartment under the rear seat just very adequate space to store things underneath it. I would imagine the things could possibly slide forward and/or backward under hard braking or hard acceleration without something holding it in place unless whatever you store under the seat is tall enough where it kinda rubs against the underneath of the rear seat to somewhat hold it in place. The gear and work boots I carried around I just left them in the floor on the backseat area as there is plenty of space between the front seats and the backseat. I'm 5'11 and I had enormous amount of leg room in the backseat behind the driver's seat adjusted to my liking.

Let's move on to the features of the XLT. I would guess the XLT is similar to a SR5 Tundra or SR Tundra (my Tundra is a limited). On this model F150, the seats were cloth, again column shifter with seating for 6. The F150 had power windows, locks, mirrors, and power locking tailgate. There is no way to lock/unlock the tailgate on the tailgate itself with a key. It locks/unlocks with the key fob when you lock/unlock the doors. There's an AM/FM radio which included satellite radio, HD radio, Bluetooth, and single disc CD player. I would guess and say the radio is their base model with a 4 inch screen (non touchscreen). Underneath the radio there's 2 USB ports which I used to charge my phone. There's also 2 other cigarette lighter style ports. I believe one port read 110 volts or maybe 120 volts. Overall the interior of the F150 was very spacious and the seats are comfortable. Last, the driver seat was all manual with the option to move forward/backward and recline.

Now if you're still reading here's the part that most of you are most interested in, how does it drive. Again this is the 3.5 liter Ecoboost. The transmission was a 10 speed auto. On the dash between the rpm gauge and speedometer it shows what gear you're in. Under normal acceleration, the transmission would shift 1 to 3, 3 to 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10. Around 45-50mph you're already in 10th gear. If I read correctly on the door jab, the gear ratio on this particular F150 came with 3.15 gears. This model did not have a tow package so I don't know how it tows. Is there turbo lag? There's a little but it responds very well especially when you're in boost. During my time with the F150, my driving was around town. To and from work and running errands around town with my Tundra I usually average around 15mpg. Before leaving the rental place with the F150 I reset the MPG gauge and the tank was full (23 gallon tank). Over the course of 1,055 miles the computer said I averaged 22.6mpg around town. Now to my driving habits. On the first tank of gas, I launched the F150 from 0 to highway speeds probably around 15x or more. Boy oh boy this 3.5 ecoboost can move!! It is FAST!! One thing I didn't like is the start/stop feature. Within 3 seconds of stopping at a red light or stop sign or even in the drive thru, the F150 will shut off. If you had the AC blowing on the highest setting, while the truck is off it's probably blowing on the first blower speed and the AC isn't as cold. It's cool but not cold. There's a button above the radio to turn the auto start stop off. You have to do this every time you start the truck OR it automatically turns off start/stop if you drive in sport mode. Experimenting a little I think if I was stopped with the wheels turned, the F150 stayed running. Then sometimes not in sport mode with the wheels straight, the F150 would stay running while stopped. I don't know what was different and why. Back to sport mode, sport mode is fun!! The gas pedal input is very responsive I would guess similar to the 2014+ Tundra when using the tow/haul mode. There is a +/- gear selector button on the column shifter similar to what you would find on the colum shifter on a Tundra. The one gripe about sport mode on the F150, it doesn't transition well from spirited acceleration to normal driving. For example after a spirited acceleration and you want to get out of the throttle and drive normal, the transmission will stay in the lowest gear possible thinking you still want to floor it. So I would just turn sport mode off to make it shift normal. Also there is a tow/haul feature but I never used it to give any feedback on it.

Ok after about 15 or more brake boosted launches and otherwise regular driving around town I was able to drive 386 miles before refilling. The DTE read 17 miles when I stopped to refill. I forget exactly how many gallons I pumped but I hand calculated it and I averaged 19mpg on that tank. Also note I don't know how far the rental company drove after initially refilling the tank (I received the truck with a full tank). Again I reset the trip and mpg after taking possession of the truck. The computer read I averaged 22mpg even with all of the hard launching and spirited driving. On the 2nd tank I drove a little more normal. I probably brake boost launched it maybe 3-5x otherwise normal driving with no sport mode except the times I launched it. On the 2nd tank I was able to drive 492 miles around town. When I stopped to refill the DTE read 3 miles. I pumped 22.224 gallons in the 23 gallon tank for an average of 22.13mpg. Without the spirited launching, 500 miles on a tank around town is attainable. Overall I was pleased with the mpg. Forgot to address this earlier, the 10 speed transmission shiftes smooth. No hard jerks of the such. It doesn't really hunt for gears even when passing on the interstate. If you watch the live mpg gauge you can tell when you're in boost the mpg will go from mid/high 20s mpg to 14-16mpg until you level out on the gas pedal back to mid 20s mpg. Upon returning the F150 back to the rental company and after 1,055 miles of hard spirited/normal driving around town, I still had just a little under 3/4 of gas on the 3rd tank and the mpg that I reset when I initially picked up the F150 read 22.6mpg.

Before returning the F150, I got the chance to line it up vs my Tundra in a little race from a stop. My 2008 Tundra is 2WD 2.5 inch level with AFE drop in filter, 18 inch magnaflow muffler, 20x9 Fuel +1 wheels wrapped in 275/65/20 Toyo AT 2s. I have close to 70k miles on my AT 2s. They are due for a replacement. The F150 again had 18 inch factory alloy wheels on Michelin highway tires. There's 13,000 miles on the F150 tires assuming there are the ones from factory. On the Tundra all nannies were turned off with the gear selector in S6. On the F150, the advance track was completely turned off with the gear selector in sport mode. Tundra had a total of 3 people. The F150 had just the driver, no passengers. The F150 initiated the jump (no horn honking). Out the gate the F150 was spinning the rear wheels. The Tundra also spun the rear tires pretty good. By the time the F150 caught grip and the Tundra stopped spinning the F150 already had a half length lead over the Tundra. As the F150 hit boost it just walked away from the Tundra to the point up to around 70mph when both trucks shut it down. The F150 lead grew to a 1.5-2 truck gap. The F150 is definitely faster. With the optional 3.73 gears, this 3.5 ecoboost would be a badd truck!! I looked at Ford's gear ratio and towing chart, and the 4WD 3.5 eco equipped with 3.73 gears has a max tow capacity of 11.5k lbs.

Overall impressions: this was my SECOND TIME driving a 3.5 ecoboost. Very pleased with the good mpg around town. The truck has good power/acceleration. The 10 speed shifts smooth, it doesn't hunt gears. The boost comes on around 2k rpm. Around 3k rpm, hang on!! The start stop feature kinda sucks especially when it is warm outside and the AC is barely blowing. Again this feature can be turned off after starting the truck OR by driving in sport mode. One thing I noticed, you have to give the rear doors a good shove to close them. I've read on the F150 forum of misaligned doors on the 2015+ F150. The auto lock/unlock tailgate is a cool feature. On this XLT it did NOT have the soft/slow dampening tailgate like found on the 2007+ Tundra. Also on this supercrew XLT model with the colum shifter, there's no rear AC vents so you have the pump the AC for it to reach the backseat passengers. There's no sliding or power rear window. There's an auto headlight feature with fog lamps. The front windows are auto up and down I know from the driver side. I test drove a 2012 3.5 ecoboost platinum about 4 yrs ago and I wasn't blown away to trade my Tundra for it. It was nice inside and had plenty of tech. In my opinion it didn't pull like my Tundra. However this 2017 3.5 ecoboost 10 speed pulls hard and smooth!! Doesn't have that V8 rumble I'm used to but it is smooth. Would I trade my Tundra for it? No and one main reason is due to all the problems I see on f150forum.com about these ecoboost engines and fit and finish of the truck. I have 163k miles on my Tundra and I just recently had to replace my 2 front door lock actuators. Minus replacing the OEM battery after 7yrs, that's the only dime I've spent on my truck. Also I'm due for new brakes as well (will be 3rd set). Around 71k miles I had a rear wheel bearing replaced under warranty. Back to the F150 vs my Tundra, as soon as I got back in my Tundra, I noticed it shifting kinda hunting for gears beteeen 5th and 6th gear whereas the F150 was smooth and you don't notice the gear shifts. This could have something do with my 34 inch tires and aftermarket rims. The gear shifting or should I say down shifting is more noticeable in my Tundra largely due to the fact of my magnaflow exhaust. On the F150, it's quiet and you don't hear it unless it's under hard acceleration. With that being said, I'll be throwing my stock muffler back on my Tundra. I kinda enjoyed the quietness of the F150. That's the first thing I noticed being back in my Tundra, how loud the exhaust is and how loud the tires have become.

Last for you audio freaks, I'm not a good judge on audio but the F150 was adequate. I only listened to the radio. It sounds ok to me. I think it only has 4-6 speakers. The JBL in my Tundra for the most part suits me fine.

Hopefully someone finds this useful when cross shopping for trucks comparing the Tundra and F150.

Edit: the 110 volt cigarette style port next to the radio stays hot AFTER you turn the truck completely off. I can't remember if the other ports and USB ports stay hot after the vehicle is shut off. Also there is a charger port on the rear of the front middle seat/console for the rear passengers.
 

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2017 vs. a 2008. Huge difference in Technology and Ride. While the review is fantastic, it is a very easy conclusion on what truck would win out based on the 10 year difference.

If you compared 2017 vs. 2017, I would take the Tundra hands down.


"If you compared 2017 vs. 2017, I would take the Tundra hands down"

IMHO, it would make no real world difference whether or not you tested a 2008 Tundra vs a 2017 Tundra... They are essentially the same basic truck! The drivetrain has been the same from 2007 to 2017. Maybe a few very minor engineering tweaks here and there but it is all cosmetic changes that have been made from 2007 to 2017.

I speak from experience, as I have owned a 2008 5.7 Grade Double Cab and now own a 2016 5.7 Limited Double Cab. The 2016 compared to the 2008 is missing the driver side grab handle, center roof console storage nook, rear door storage completely gone, map pocket gone on drivers seat back, no second upper glovebox and miniscule main glovebox, no front door storage nook, better sound in the 2008, no transmission temp gauge. Bean counting at it's finest!!! Additionally, the paint in the newer trucks is criminally soft and all of the interior plastics are absolutely horrible and are EXTREMELY scratch prone compared to the 2008. Sorry, had to get that off my chest! :mad:

Need I go on?

IMHO, styling aside, in many ways the 2008 Tundra was better and it got a little better fuel mileage than my new 2016!


...Glenn :)
 

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2017 vs. a 2008. Huge difference in Technology and Ride. While the review is fantastic, it is a very easy conclusion on what truck would win out based on the 10 year difference.

If you compared 2017 vs. 2017, I would take the Tundra hands down.
Lol the Tundra drivetrain hasn't been changed since 2007!!! The newest Tundras are the same as they were 10 years ago
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
"If you compared 2017 vs. 2017, I would take the Tundra hands down"

IMHO, it would make no real world difference whether or not you tested a 2008 Tundra vs a 2017 Tundra... They are essentially the same basic truck! The drivetrain has been the same from 2007 to 2017. Maybe a few very minor engineering tweaks here and there but it is all cosmetic changes that have been made from 2007 to 2017.

I speak from experience, as I have owned a 2008 5.7 Grade Double Cab and now own a 2016 5.7 Limited Double Cab. The 2016 compared to the 2008 is missing the driver side grab handle, center roof console storage nook, rear door storage completely gone, map pocket gone on drivers seat back, no second upper glovebox and miniscule main glovebox, no front door storage nook, better sound in the 2008, no transmission temp gauge. Bean counting at it's finest!!! Additionally, the paint in the newer trucks is criminally soft and all of the interior plastics are absolutely horrible and are EXTREMELY scratch prone compared to the 2008. Sorry, had to get that off my chest! :mad:

Need I go on?

IMHO, styling aside, in many ways the 2008 Tundra was better and it got a little better fuel mileage than my new 2016!


...Glenn :)
My thoughts are the same as you mentioned. This is why I have not traded my 2008 for a new Tundra. Also I pay attention to the gripes by those on here who previously owned a 2007-2013 Tundra and now own a 2014-2017 Tundra. But I will say I would take the gripes of the 2014-2017 Tundra owners over the gripes of the 2015-2017 F150 owners on f150forum.com. I know there's a lot more F150s vs Tundras but some of the things you read on F15forum.com in the subforum "2015+ models" are downright frightening. It's almost a flip of a coin on getting a problem free F150 just based off the forum reviews from owners.
 

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My thoughts are the same as you mentioned. This is why I have not traded my 2008 for a new Tundra. Also I pay attention to the gripes by those on here who previously owned a 2007-2013 Tundra and now own a 2014-2017 Tundra. But I will say I would take the gripes of the 2014-2017 Tundra owners over the gripes of the 2015-2017 F150 owners on f150forum.com. I know there's a lot more F150s vs Tundras but some of the things you read on F15forum.com in the subforum "2015+ models" are downright frightening. It's almost a flip of a coin on getting a problem free F150 just based off the forum reviews from owners.
I hear you Bayou!

I absolutely love my 2016 Tundra! I have been a die hard Toyota fan my entire adult life and I have had a number of their cars and trucks, all purchased new.

The overall reliability and proven engineering of Toyota keeps me coming back! :D

It's a damn shame that some numbskull rear ended my 2008 Tundra at high speed while I was stopped at a red light. Truck was totalled but the old girl sure saved me! Insurance gave me a pretty penny for the 8 year old truck... gotta love Toyota's resale value!

Anyhow, enjoyed owning and driving that 2008 without payments for 4 years and would have kept it for a long time was it not for the loss. As soon as I knew the insurance payout I made a deal right away on the new 2016 Tundra.



...Glenn
 

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For little over a week (9 days) I was in a rental while my Tundra was being repaired (accident damage). The rental I was given was a 2017 F150 2.7 V6 Ecoboost.
Are you positive it was a 2.7? I thought only the 3.5 was available with the 10 speed for 2017. Ford's website won't even let me build a 4x2 Supercrew 2.7 with the 10 speed.

Also, I wouldn't consider the acceleration test real fair given your 34" tires that probably weigh 15 lbs more per corner than stock.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Are you positive it was a 2.7? I thought only the 3.5 was available with the 10 speed for 2017. Ford's website won't even let me build a 4x2 Supercrew 2.7 with the 10 speed.

Also, I wouldn't consider the acceleration test real fair given your 34" tires that probably weigh 15 lbs more per corner than stock.
I popped the hood and saw 2.7 in writing on the stamp on the hood. But after a quick research you may be correct. The 10 speed is only offered with the 3.5 ecoboost whereas the 10 speed will be offered in the 2.7 and 5.0 V8 starting on the 2018 models. I'm 100% sure I was driving a 2017 ecoboost. There's no engine code marking on the engine itself. So I was driving a 2017 3.5 Ecoboost with the 10 speed transmission with 375hp and 470ft lbs torque.

With that being said let me edit my original post. I apologize for my mistake. Thank you catching it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
Makes your milage that much more impressive.
What made the mpg impressive is the fact the F150 had 3.15 gears. I saw the gear ratio code on the driver's door jam. According to the Ford towing chart, the model I drove has a conventional towing capacity of 10,700lbs (subtract 100lbs for 4WD) and 5th wheel towing capacity of 10,400lbs (subtract 200lbs for 4WD)

Here's a video of it launching in sport mode with traction control on.


Here's a video of it launching in sport mode with advanced trac turned completely off.

 

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I popped the hood and saw 2.7 in writing on the stamp on the hood. But after a quick research you may be correct. The 10 speed is only offered with the 3.5 ecoboost whereas the 10 speed will be offered in the 2.7 and 5.0 V8 starting on the 2018 models. I'm 100% sure I was driving a 2017 ecoboost. There's no engine code marking on the engine itself. So I was driving a 2017 3.5 Ecoboost with the 10 speed transmission with 375hp and 470ft lbs torque.



With that being said let me edit my original post. I apologize for my mistake. Thank you catching it.


So ford is so jacked up they put the wrong badge on it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
So ford is so jacked up they put the wrong badge on it?
Idk. I know someone who has a 2012 F150 5.0 V8. On the sticker on the hood it states 6.2 liter. I assume they use the same parts (hood etc) and stamps regardless of what engine is in it.

Correct me if I'm wrong but there isn't any mention of 4.7 V8 anywhere on my 2008 Tundra 5.7. You know it's a 5.7 before you pop the hood.
 

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I've owned three different Tundras, a 2008, 2011, and now a 2017. My sister and brother-in-law have had 3 different F150's through the years (I'm not sure what all the years were). While this may be criminal to say on this forum, I do think Ford makes a pretty decent truck. It drives well enough, although the steering seems super light, rides well enough, and seems to be put together well enough. They really haven't had any trouble with them at all.

I obviously prefer the Tundra to the F150 but I look at it more like do you prefer a Snickers bar or a Twix? Both are good, but I have my preference and am not overly concerned with justifying that preference... it's simply what I like.
 

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Thanks for the comparison! Honestly, before I bought my TRDP, that new f150 with the 3.5 eco was almost tempting. At elevation, those ecoboost motors just don't ever run out of air like a naturally aspirated motor will. Some of the bells and whistles are cool too but then I'm reminded of my early 2012 ecoboost f150. I was very close to buying a Rock Warrior Tundra back then but I drove that ecoboost and I was hooked on the boost. Initially things were great with it, power, mpg, etc. but as time and mileage added up more and more stuff broke started acting up. Our first long trip in that truck with only 5k on it, the intercooler cracked open and we limped it home as the dealer in las vegas didn't have any on hand. Then a coil pack or two went, along with the spark plugs. It developed a weird turbo surge condition which required a reflash that did in fact cured the surge but hurt the mpg. Then another set of plugs and another reflash which seemed to disable the check engine light. At around 40k it really started diluting the oil with gas. I noticed it by checking the oil one day and noticed it was overfilled. I took an oil sample and it did come back with excessive fuel in the oil. The other thing happening along with all that was the fuel that was evaporating in the oil and getting discharged from the crankcase vent was condensing in the intercooler and pooling up. Literally, the truck was trying to hydrolock itself. After choking on it's own boogers a few times it developed a pretty nasty cold start knock and some electrical gremlins also popped up. Unfortunately, I couldn't get ford to fix it at this point because there were no codes found even though the tech admitted it wasn't running right. After getting the run around I just decided to trade it off because I really couldn't trust it anymore. By 45k, the power was gone, the good mpg was definitely gone, I had to remove my phone from the sync system because it would randomly dial people in my contacts, the gas pedal would randomly go dead, and it had a ton of squeaks. I know they're not all bad but that truck left a bad taste in my mouth.

FWIW, the 2017 3.5 ecoboost is supposed to be all new, just the displacement is the same. I just couldn't bring myself to being another test dummy for ford though because that's what it seemed like on my 2012.
 

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Then another set of plugs and another reflash which seemed to disable the check engine light.


This just blew my mind a little.

Does that really happen?

Can anyone confirm that a manufacturer/dealer can and would actually do this ?

In the letigious society we live in I cannot fathom what would happen if that was to ever come to light.
 

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Tundras still have the biggest rear axle, brakes bigger than 3/4 ton trucks, huge tre's. I don't think the tundra needs to catch up in the drivetrain department.
The tundra is better over all, all the Ford has to brag about is power. Long term reliability of that engine is still in question.

Tundra is still a better truck.

Thanks for the review OP!
 
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