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We just purchased a new Forest River Flagstaff 832CLSB travel trailer that I think has put us over on several limits but I have a couple of questions on WD.

Truck:
2014 Toyota Tundra TSS 4X4 5.7L
Curb Wght: 5560
GVWR: 7200
Payload: 1360
GAWR Front: 4000
GAWR Rear: 4150
Towing: 9800
GCVWR: 16000

The weight and length specs on the camper are:
882594


I have the Equalizer 4 WDH to go along with the trailer.

We picked the camper up a couple of weekends ago, I took the camper by a CAT Scale and these are the initial readings I got, this was unloaded except for my wife and myself and the camper had a few gallons of fresh water but no more than maybe 32lbs or so.

steer axle: 3180
drive axle: 4560
trailer axle: 7580
total axle: 15320

We took that camper out last weekend completely loaded the way we did with our previous camper and hit the same scale again and here are the numbers:

steer axle: 3320
drive axle: 4660
trailer axle: 8200
total axle: 16180

First thing, I am now over GCVWR I know but the camper had 0 sway and pulled extremely easily but it was only a 55 mile trip and I am concerned about the weight.

My real question is does the WDH seem to be setup right because the Rear axle seems like it has too much weight even with the heavy duty tires and the front end seems light along with the trailer axle weight.

New truck??? I love my Tundra but also want to be safe.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
We just purchased a new Forest River Flagstaff 832CLSB travel trailer that I think has put us over on several limits but I have a couple of questions on WD.

Truck:
2014 Toyota Tundra TSS 4X4 5.7L
Curb Wght: 5560
GVWR: 7200
Payload: 1360
GAWR Front: 4000
GAWR Rear: 4150
Towing: 9800
GCVWR: 16000

The weight and length specs on the camper are:
View attachment 882594

I have the Equalizer 4 WDH to go along with the trailer.

We picked the camper up a couple of weekends ago, I took the camper by a CAT Scale and these are the initial readings I got, this was unloaded except for my wife and myself and the camper had a few gallons of fresh water but no more than maybe 32lbs or so.

steer axle: 3180
drive axle: 4560
trailer axle: 7580
total axle: 15320

We took that camper out last weekend completely loaded the way we did with our previous camper and hit the same scale again and here are the numbers:

steer axle: 3320
drive axle: 4660
trailer axle: 8200
total axle: 16180

First thing, I am now over GCVWR I know but the camper had 0 sway and pulled extremely easily but it was only a 55 mile trip and I am concerned about the weight.

My real question is does the WDH seem to be setup right because the Rear axle seems like it has too much weight even with the heavy duty tires and the front end seems light along with the trailer axle weight.

New truck??? I love my Tundra but also want to be safe.
I forgot to add that my tundra has new Fox 2.0 shocks front and rear and a Firestone air lift kit in the rear.
Running on 285/55/R20 Falken Wildpeak AT3 122 rated 10 ply tires.
 

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hard to say if the hitch is set up right need to measure amount of drop front and back and weigh the truck unloaded to see how much is going onto each axle.
I'd say the risk is up to you. if you're doing a few short trips per year and you don't mind the risk then go for it. if you travel long distances, go into the mountains or many steep grades up/down, then you might be asking for trouble. in my experience, the tundra will pull it....but stopping might be a different matter.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
hard to say if the hitch is set up right need to measure amount of drop front and back and weigh the truck unloaded to see how much is going onto each axle.
I'd say the risk is up to you. if you're doing a few short trips per year and you don't mind the risk then go for it. if you travel long distances, go into the mountains or many steep grades up/down, then you might be asking for trouble. in my experience, the tundra will pull it....but stopping might be a different matter.
I upgraded the brakes when I got my first trailer and so far no issues with sudden stopping on flat ground, don't ask me how I know!!! We use our camper quite a bit, 1 or 2 times a month and anywhere from 1/2 hour to 12 or 13 hours away including some mountains. Headed out on a 600 mile trip at the end of July, I need to decide before then I guess. I thought maybe I needed to get the weight of the truck without the camper but that scale seems to always be busy and didn't want to unhook to go through but will try and get there this week with just the truck. The front end was right at halfway back to original so I may make another adjustment and see if I can get it all the way back. Thanks for the input.
 

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I tow with a 2015 tss and have been since 2015. As long as you keep your maintenance the truck is capable. I can’t speak on WD hitches because I pull a fifth wheel. I’m a lot higher on axle weight than you are. I have taken mine to the smoky mountains and had a blast. I’m currently in Galveston and have been exploring locally. My fifth wheel is a lite 40’ fifth wheel. It does extremely well in wind and no sway what so ever. Did have a blow out on the fiver but it was due to China bomb tires.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I tow with a 2015 tss and have been since 2015. As long as you keep your maintenance the truck is capable. I can’t speak on WD hitches because I pull a fifth wheel. I’m a lot higher on axle weight than you are. I have taken mine to the smoky mountains and had a blast. I’m currently in Galveston and have been exploring locally. My fifth wheel is a lite 40’ fifth wheel. It does extremely well in wind and no sway what so ever. Did have a blow out on the fiver but it was due to China bomb tires.
That is good to know. I wonder if yours handles better because the weight is directly over the axle and not the hitch but either way that is a big camper so that definitely helps. I am going to Rockport for the 4th so that is going to be my big test run on whether I go to a 3/4 or not. I am going to play around with the WDH to see if I can get more weight off the rear axle because I think I have room.
 

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Something to keep in mind, you can probably get away with the weight but if you ever did have issues your insurance company may deny your claim due to being overloaded
 

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You are definitely at the limits of what the tundra is rated for, but you are not grossly over anything. Toyota has to put a limit on these trucks, and I am sure there is some factor of safety applied to these ratings, not to mention that they know some nimrod is going to pull a trailer at the full rating and try to drive it like a Ferrari.

So, don't do that. Take it easy, slow down, and you will be fine. I pulled a 32 ft TT with WDH with a CM with the 4.6L engine all over the place and it was fine. I usually limit speed to about 60 mph on the highway, run the transmission in 4th, and don't use the cruise control. Instead, I use the throttle so that as I go up hills, I prevent the transmission from downshifting as much as possible. You will get use to what the engine sounds like right before it down shifts and I just let off the gas a little to keep it in 4th with the converter locked up. If you run the torque converter unlocked, and let the transmission shift up and down on every hill, you are going to wear it out. So, take it slow, let the transmission stay in gear without downshifting much, and you will be good.

On steep downhill grades, let the engine do as much work as you can to hold the weight back. RPM's don't hurt anything so let it eat all the way to red line if you want (I usually don't go over 5000 rpms). And if you have to use the brakes, use them for short times to slow it down, then release and let them cool off, then back on the brakes, then off again. Don't stay on them, even a little bit, for a long time or you will cook them and lose your brakes. And also make sure the trailer brakes are set up so they do all the work for the trailer. You truck brakes should really not work any harder than pulling without a trailer and the trailer brakes should take care of the trailer. Again, let the engine do as much of the work as possible. Take it slow. For steep grades, you may need to be all the way down in first gear to hold the weight back.

The Tundra is the best tow vehicle I have ever pulled with so I would not go bigger or different unless you really have to.
 
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