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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 2013 Tundra is 3 weeks old, and I really like it.

One small thing that is a little annoying: the brake pedal feels a little "soft".

The brakes work fine, but the pedal does not have a solid feel to it.

The dealer claims that is the way that it is.

Is it me, or is this a characteristic of the truck?
 

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Time for some stainless braided lines? Mine feels soft-ish, but only in comparison to cars. Drive a GM vehicle from the late 80's up until just recently, THAT's what a soft brake pedal feels like.
 

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They are all that way. It's part of the ABS system whether you like it or not (and most people don't).
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I took it to the dealer this morning. Got a call about 1 hour later...

Dealer: "The brakes work as they should, and the fluid level is good".

Me: "I think you need to bleed the brakes."

Dealer: "The brakes are fine".

Me: "Please connect me to the zone representative to discuss the matter".

Dealer: "Your brake bleeding will be done in 2 hours".

I picked the truck up, and the pedal feel is noticeably better.

FYI
 

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My 2012 Tacoma's brake feel was fine. But its brakes sucked, particularly with the rear drum silliness. It also donkey'ed around bucking and grabbing harder in the rear at some speeds, harder in the front at other speeds.
Although, I blame part of that on its clunky downshifts.

The Tundra's are much smoother and linear, they're plenty powerful, but require a stiff foot.

I do find it kinda funny that the throttle is absurdly touchy, and the brakes are on the mushy side. :rolleyes:
 

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noticed that as well with the brake
 

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Glad I'm not the only one that thought the brake pedal feels soft.

At first I thought it was due to the new LRO 3/1 lift, new Fuel Hostage 20x9 wheels and Nitto Trail Grappler LT305/55/20 tires.

I didn't notice the feel when I bought the Truck. It wasn't until I drove my BMW 335i for about 2 weeks then back to the Tundra.

Guess I'll just have to learn to press the brake pedal sooner when breaking.
 

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Solution! I have a 2015 CM 5.7L 4x4 TRD, 135K, new pads front and back 2 years ago. My brake pedal was getting soft as well. The brake lines had never been apart so no air could have ever entered the system. Symptoms were that the brake pedal had excessive travel to get brakes to engage, and I had to push the brake pedal a lot harder than normal to stop. If felt like I needed to pump the brakes every time I stepped on the brakes. One pump would give slightly better brake pedal, but it never lasted and always felt soft, even after pumping. With engine off, I could pump up a hard pedal, but with the engine running, the pedal was soft and if I pushed it long enough, it would go to the floor.
I tried to do a 2 man bleed of the fluid and bled enough through to completely replace the fluid (except what was in the ABS system). We bled all 4 wheels and got no air out of the system. After the bleed, the system was essentially the same as before.

I took it to Kolosso Toyota in Appleton, WI to help with the problem. They inspected the brakes and said the front pins in the front calipers were rusted and seized. There are NOT the two guide pins. These are the smaller pins that guide the brake pad. See the attached picture below.

The tech took the front and rear brake calipers aparts, cleaned all of these pins and lubricated everything, and put it all back together. He said the pistons were not seized. He did not replace any pads or rotors. He did not have to bleed the brakes because I don't think he had to open the calipers. On the receipts, it says"performed brake service". He only cleaned and lubricated the caliper pins.

Afterwards, the brake pedal is back to perfect and the truck stops great.
 

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Solution! I have a 2015 CM 5.7L 4x4 TRD, 135K, new pads front and back 2 years ago. My brake pedal was getting soft as well. The brake lines had never been apart so no air could have ever entered the system. Symptoms were that the brake pedal had excessive travel to get brakes to engage, and I had to push the brake pedal a lot harder than normal to stop. If felt like I needed to pump the brakes every time I stepped on the brakes. One pump would give slightly better brake pedal, but it never lasted and always felt soft, even after pumping. With engine off, I could pump up a hard pedal, but with the engine running, the pedal was soft and if I pushed it long enough, it would go to the floor.
I tried to do a 2 man bleed of the fluid and bled enough through to completely replace the fluid (except what was in the ABS system). We bled all 4 wheels and got no air out of the system. After the bleed, the system was essentially the same as before.

I took it to Kolosso Toyota in Appleton, WI to help with the problem. They inspected the brakes and said the front pins in the front calipers were rusted and seized. There are NOT the two guide pins. These are the smaller pins that guide the brake pad. See the attached picture below.

The tech took the front and rear brake calipers aparts, cleaned all of these pins and lubricated everything, and put it all back together. He said the pistons were not seized. He did not replace any pads or rotors. He did not have to bleed the brakes because I don't think he had to open the calipers. On the receipts, it says"performed brake service". He only cleaned and lubricated the caliper pins.

Afterwards, the brake pedal is back to perfect and the truck stops great.
This “brake service” is a factory recommended regular service item every 32,000km I believe. Oddly, I asked my dealer to do this and they didn’t know what I wanted. Ahh, dealerships…

If you drive a newer F-150 back to back with your Tundra, then you’ll really notice that soft/squishy brake pedal feel. The F-150 is firm and grabs hard with little pedal travel. Personally I prefer the lazy Tundra pedal feel, but maybe that’s just because I’m so used to it?
 

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I think the corrosion in the pins in the front calipers really throws people off in diagnosing what is going on. I would have sworn I had air in my brake lines. That is what it felt like. And because I could push my pedal down so far and so easily, it really made me think I had a master cylinder issues or a leak somewhere. Usually, when a caliper rusts up, it gets stuck and one pad is held against the rotor and wears it down to nothing so you find one good pad and one totally destroyed pad. But my pads were wearing evenly and that led me to conclude my calipers were OK.

But that is not how the Tundra brake system works. When the pins get rusted and seize, you have to push the pedal further down. The Tundra brake system will allow you to push the pedal to the floor if you push hard enough and long enough even with perfect brakes. And that is very deceiving and that causes a lot of confusion.

What was actually happening to me was that I was pushing the pedal further and further down, but the difference to get the pedal to the floor was not much different than normal, so it felt like nothing was happening. After the repair, my pedal is still soft and I can still push it down much the same (there is a little more firmness to it, but not as much as I would expect). The big difference is that I only push the pedal a little bit with very little effort, and I get lots of braking performance, and because the brakes come on so fast and easy, I never really push it down any further to see what happens. In fact, if you do push it down, the pedal will go down and down and down, but that is normal.

If you have a soft pedal, and you have not let air in the system, then air is not in the system. If the pedal is soft and traveling too far, look close at the calipers to see if they are rusted up in any way. The tech that did the repair said you have to check the guide pins, the small pins in my picture above, the brake pads and hardware, and the brake pistons. Everything has to be able to move. If anything is tight or seized, you will get excessive brake pedal travel.
 
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