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Discussion Starter #1
So I just hit 60k on my tundra. 2013 5.7 4x4. a friend of a friend is a toyota mechanic and I asked him what I need done to the truck. he recommended:

Brake fluid flush
Transfer case fluid exchange
both differential fluid exchange
air filter (not needed I have a K&N)
cabin air filter
oil change

he quoted me $470

He said most of it was the fluids and that toyota gear oil was expensive. does this sound right/reasonable?
 

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So I just hit 60k on my tundra. 2013 5.7 4x4. a friend of a friend is a toyota mechanic and I asked him what I need done to the truck. he recommended:

Brake fluid flush
Transfer case fluid exchange
both differential fluid exchange
air filter (not needed I have a K&N)
cabin air filter
oil change

he quoted me $470

He said most of it was the fluids and that toyota gear oil was expensive. does this sound right/reasonable?
Sounds like typical dealership banter, so yes.
I call it the "rubber stamp" treatment.
None of it is a bad idea, but the question is...does a 3-4 year old truck really need it. There's a PH/moisture test strip to test brake fluid. They are expensive so a lot of places just recommend a brake flush at 2 years or so. Odds are, your brake fluid will pass the dip strip test. I'm actually surprised that he didn't recommend a coolant flush as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Sounds like typical dealership banter, so yes.
I call it the "rubber stamp" treatment.
None of it is a bad idea, but the question is...does a 3-4 year old truck really need it. There's a PH/moisture test strip to test brake fluid. They are expensive so a lot of places just recommend a brake flush at 2 years or so. Odds are, your brake fluid will pass the dip strip test. I'm actually surprised that he didn't recommend a coolant flush as well.
thats funny that you mention the brake fluid because he stated he was not charging me for brake fluid, he blamed the bulk of the cost on the differential and transfer case fluids
 

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I have never understood the brake fluid flush unless their is a problem. I am an ex mechanic and went to school for it. Never was I taught to flush the entire brake system. Nor did I ever run into a problem on a higher mileage vehicle ever.


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I have never understood the brake fluid flush unless their is a problem. I am an ex mechanic and went to school for it. Never was I taught to flush the entire brake system. Nor did I ever run into a problem on a higher mileage vehicle ever.


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I am not a mechanic but worked at a parts store. I was always taught and bought into the idea that brake fluid absorbed water/moiture. even in a sealed system. so eventually it would need to be flushed. but once again. I do not know jack
 

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I have never understood the brake fluid flush unless their is a problem. I am an ex mechanic and went to school for it. Never was I taught to flush the entire brake system. Nor did I ever run into a problem on a higher mileage vehicle ever.


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I am not a mechanic but worked at a parts store. I was always taught and bought into the idea that brake fluid absorbed water/moiture. even in a sealed system. so eventually it would need to be flushed. but once again. I do not know jack
That is correct. Over time it leads to corrosion. It can also lead to air in the hydraulic system. The water in the brake fluid can boil at the calipers under extended braking like rolling down the side of a mountain while pulling a trailer. When the water boils, the oxygen is released from the water. This leads to a spongy pedal a decreased braking efficiency.
Typical manufacturer recommendations for a flush is every 2 years. In my experience, using test strips, brake fluid typically lasts 4+ years under normal brake use.
Strips are available to test coolant, too. At one dealership I worked at, we mixed our own antifreeze/coolant on site for each vehicle. that was a pain in the arse, but taught me a lot about antifreeze/coolant.
 

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thats funny that you mention the brake fluid because he stated he was not charging me for brake fluid, he blamed the bulk of the cost on the differential and transfer case fluids
And he's right. Synthetic lubricants that are found in most gearboxes these days can run $20+ per qt, more if you're buying OEM fluid.
Flushes are a major money maker for all shops and, in my opinion, are over-sold to customers. The cabin filter is another place where the OEM can be way overpriced. I think my last one from Rock Auto was under ten bucks. A brake fluid flush runs from $59-99 in most shops and includes any fluid they use.

I'm guessing that you could do the flushes and oil change yourself and come in around the $100 mark depending an what engine oil you choose. (if you use aftermarket fluids and cabin filter)
 

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Even though it's a little outside of the viscosity range, Mobil1 75W90 meets all other specifications for both the differentials and transfer case. Looking at the "before photo" it takes a little under 8 quarts of gear oil.

Brake fluid? Valvoline DOT3/DOT4 works just fine.
 
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