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2012 Toyota Tundra SR5
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When I press the brakes the car gradually comes to a stop. I have checked the following:
  1. Brake fluid
  2. Had brakes flushed
  3. Brake pads are good
  4. No leaks around master cylinder.
All the above have check out good!!!

Still it seems that if I slam on the brakes to a bit for it to kick in to come to a complete stop. Anyone seen this before???
 

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Do some research on the ABS actuator. Seems to me there is a valve that can stick and cause poor braking performance. Go find a gravel road and stomp on the brakes a few times to engage the ABS system and see if that helps.
 

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^^ I agree. It seems that a good romp or two on the brakes to get the ABS to kick in can often time fix the issues.

Another thing to check - once you bring the vehicle to a stop, does the brake pedal occasional fall, requiring more and more pedal travel to keep the vehicle stopped? This is usually from a bad master cylinder. The bore wears out from use (rarely) or from moisture in the brake fluid (most often the case) from never being changed or from tech's opening up the brake fluid cap to check the level rather than sighting through the reservoir.

Also, you didn't mention what year tundra this is on? 2007-current all have four wheel disc brakes, but if memory serves, some 1st gen tundras have rear drums. If this is the case, the shoes are probably worn and are causing excess pedal travel. In which case, they would need to be adjusted or replaced.
 

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My (2000 SR5) does the same but I don’t think it has ABS. I’m going to adjust my parking break cable and let the auto adjust system do it work.
 

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The front brakes have pistons on both sides of the calipers. The calipers are rigidly attached to the carriers, and the pistons push both pads toward the rotor. If there is rust build-up where the pads are in contact with the carriers, they are much harder to move. My experience is that one pad may be completely immobilized, so there is no real squeezing action on the rotor, just one-sided pressure. I had one pad (the frozen one) barely worn, the other one almost completely worn out. Both front wheels.
The rear calipers have pistons on only one side, and the caliper floats on sliding mounting pins. If they aren't floating properly, they also won't get the correct squeezing action, and the piston-side will wear more quickly than the non-piston side.
Major clean-up of rust, application of high-temp brake lube where needed, new pads, and all was back to normal.
 
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