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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Help. I "pocket started" my Tundra and shut it off with the fob. The command start is an Auto Start" My immobilizer is now enabled for some reason. There was a clicking sound coming from the horn area up front and the ring around the ignition was flashing at the same time. I thought my battery was dead so tried to boost it and the alarm started going off. How the hell can I reset this? I think the battery is dead now. I'm in a mess. Love my truck but seem to have trouble with alarms. Help
 

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The first thing to try is to disconnect the battery for a while. You might as well recharge it while it's unhooked. That should reset everything.
 

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If that did not help then the next thing to check is the fuses.
Unfortunately there are a lot of them that could be causing the problem so you will basically have to check all of them both under the hood and under the dash.
 

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Found this at a VW site...
Keys Won't Work
Went to crank my 02 beetle and the immobilizer won't let it crank. Tried all 3 keys it came with and same thing. Used the suggestion of unhooking and touching 2 battery cables together and this fixed my problem. Car cranks fine and has for 2 days now. This is a very easy fix that the dealership would probably charge you several hundred dollars to preform not counting tow charge. Thank ya'll very much for all the inciteful diagnostics in this forum. Volkswagen should put stuff like this and the anti-shudder valve issue in owner's manual.
this from the manual
■ Deactivating or stopping the alarm
● Unlock the doors.
● Turn the engine switch to the ACC or ON position, or start the
engine.
(The alarm will be deactivated or stopped after a few seconds.)
■When the battery is disconnected
Be sure to cancel the alarm system.
If the battery is discharged before canceling the alarm, the system may be
triggered when the battery is reconnected.
■Alarm-operated door lock
●When the alarm is operating, the doors are locked automatically to prevent
intruders.
●Do not leave the key inside the vehicle when the alarm is operating, and
make sure the key is not inside the vehicle when recharging or replacing
the battery.
Maybe try this if your steering wheel is turned...
The immobilizer does not "lock" the ignition, it does not energize the fuel injection relay. What you have is a "locked" steering column. Put the key in the ignition, and pull/turn the steering wheel HARD left or right, whilst turning the key to on or start. Do BOTH at the same time.The action of you pulling on the steering wheel will unlock the steering column.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you mendonsy. Actually talked to Service tech at dealership and he said it is probably a main fuse. Wgreenlee1021 posted some interesting info from VW. Has anyone tried this on a Tundra? Might cancelling the alarm work?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Turns out the battery was defective. I have never had that happen to me before. It started and then three hours later, nothing. I find this really strange. Has this ever happened to anyone else?
 

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Batteries can fail in a lot of different ways.
What you had happen sounds like the link between two of the cells failed. I had one a few years ago the read 12.6 volts until you put a load on it, then it went to zero.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Like I had indicated, never happened to me before so thought it must have been something else. I use an '05 Camry for my half hour commute to work. It's got 270,000km on it and the original battery in it. Started every day this winter even in -30 deg. temps.
 

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I'm glad you got it worked out. Now go get a real battery like a diehard platinum!
 

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Batteries like everything else in America are not what they used to be.
I don't know if they have cut the lead content or the acid isn't as good as the old days but they are weak today.
Used to be you could recharge a low battery over and over.Nowadays you run it down once or twice and you've ruined that battery.
At least that is my findings.

Good that you've gotten it fixed.
 

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Batteries like everything else in America are not what they used to be.
I don't know if they have cut the lead content or the acid isn't as good as the old days but they are weak today.
Used to be you could recharge a low battery over and over.Nowadays you run it down once or twice and you've ruined that battery.
At least that is my findings.

Good that you've gotten it fixed.
A lot of it has to do with the thinning of the plates within the batteries themselves than anything else. As cold cranking amp (CCA) have gone up but battery dimensions have stayed the same for a particular size family, the cell plates have gotten thinner. The double edge sword is with thinner plates between the anode and cathode, is more heat is generated when a full load is pulled from the battery and this heat breaks down the plates even quicker than in years past when a higher CCA battery usually meant a bigger battery and thicker plates.

Most of the blame lies with the vehicle maker OEM's setting the spec for space dimensions and CCA than the battery makers themselves.
 
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