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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
My timing chain tensioner is starting to make more noise lately. Its getting to that time to replace it. I tried searching for a dyi or something close but couldn't find anything. Can someone shoot me in the right direction? I'm a heavy duty diesel mechanic so I can turn a wrench but I've never done anything engine wise on my tundra.
I've seen pics of the front cover off. Does the chain need to be pulled off to replace the tensioner? I wouldn't think it would have to. If it does can you mark the chaing and the pullies so you don't have to time anything? While I'm doing it should I do the chain guides and anything else? Is there a kit that I could buy? I'd appreciate all the help I can get. TIA!

Here is the parts list for my 2008 5.7 Tundra. You should make sure these parts will work for your truck.

1 EACH - 13540-0S020 TENSIONER
1 EACH - 11213-0S010 CYLINDER GASKET
1 EACH - 11214-0S010 CYLINDER GASKET
8 EACH - 11193-70010 SPARK PLUG GASKETS
1 EACH - 90311-A0005 TYPE T OIL SEAL
2 EACH - 16341-38030 WATER OUTLET GASKET
1 EACH - 90301-A0032 ORING
1 EACH - 15193-0S010 OIL PUMP GASKET
4 EACH - 11159-0P010 CAMSHAFT GASKET
4 EACH - 11159-0S010 CAMSHAFT GASKET
2 EACH - 96721-24025 ORING
1 EACH - 90301-A0033 ORING
4 EACH - 90430-A0001 GASKET
THREEBOND 1207B


 

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Since you are a tech, I’ll just give you basic instructions.
Remove radiator, valve covers, unbolt all accessories off the front, remove timing cover.
There are 4 tensioners there, the one that I’ve always seen fail is the primary chain tensioner on the driver side.
You can confirm that is the one by removing the oil filler tube and looking inside to see if the plunger on the tensioner is flopping back and forth.
You can just replace the failed tensioner, nothing else really goes wrong with that system otherwise as far as guides etc.
If you are concerned, replace whatever parts you desire.
The chain does not need to come off, so no worries about timing it.
There is no kit for that job, just all the gaskets for whatever you take off.
It’s around a 2 day job, and not easy on your back, but it’s doable.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Since you are a tech, I’ll just give you basic instructions.
Remove radiator, valve covers, unbolt all accessories off the front, remove timing cover.
There are 4 tensioners there, the one that I’ve always seen fail is the primary chain tensioner on the driver side.
You can confirm that is the one by removing the oil filler tube and looking inside to see if the plunger on the tensioner is flopping back and forth.
You can just replace the failed tensioner, nothing else really goes wrong with that system otherwise as far as guides etc.
If you are concerned, replace whatever parts you desire.
The chain does not need to come off, so no worries about timing it.
There is no kit for that job, just all the gaskets for whatever you take off.
It’s around a 2 day job, and not easy on your back, but it’s doable.


I thought my notifications were turned on but not. Thank you very much for your reply back! Im going to have to take a better look to see which gaskets ill have to order. Do you use oem gaskets or aftermarket?
 
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Im going to have to take a better look to see which gaskets ill have to order. Do you use oem gaskets or aftermarket?
You'll need valve cover gaskets, front crank seal, spark plug tube seals, water bypass pipe gaskets, 8 oil feed o-rings that go under the valve covers, 2 o-rings for the oil pump inlet and outlet.
Might as well replace the water pump and gasket while you are in there and throw in some new spark plugs and a drive belt as well, I might be forgetting something.

I always use OEM gaskets.
 
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Discussion Starter #5
You'll need valve cover gaskets, front crank seal, spark plug tube seals, water bypass pipe gaskets, 8 oil feed o-rings that go under the valve covers, 2 o-rings for the oil pump inlet and outlet.
Might as well replace the water pump and gasket while you are in there and throw in some new spark plugs and a drive belt as well, I might be forgetting something.

I always use OEM gaskets.
Thank you again. The waterpump has been replaced in the last 15k miles. I just can't believe I have to do this at 106k miles. Hopefully I won't have to many more problems after this. I'll keep this thread updated with some pics once I get started on it.
 
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Discussion Starter #6
Started on taking the front end apart to replace the timing chain tensioner. Then the rain came. I guess ill start back on it tomorrow.





 

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Looks like your on your way to success :mechanic:
 
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Looks like your on your way to success :mechanic:
Thank you. I didn't get to finish it up. Hopefully this weekend I'll be able to get back to it.

ViktorG is it possible to take the front cover off with out having to to take off the valve covers? Maybe they can be loosened up to move high enough to clear the front cover when taking it off?
 

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Removing the valve covers is one of the simplest parts of the job in my opinion.
It might be possible to remove the timing cover with them still on, but I would just spend the 15 minutes to take them off and make my life easier.
 
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Discussion Starter #10
Removing the valve covers is one of the simplest parts of the job in my opinion.
It might be possible to remove the timing cover with them still on, but I would just spend the 15 minutes to take them off and make my life easier.


The left side was pretty easy. The right side took some effort with all the coolant lines. I got some time today to do some more work on it. The cover is ready to come off so im going to make it a stopping point and continue on it tomorrow morning.




 

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Discussion Starter #13
Like the cardboard diagram for the hardware.
Great idea.


Thank you. I have a bad memory thats why i do it.

So today I had some time to work on it. I pulled the cover and prepped the block and cover. Then i ran into a problem. The oil pump in the cover moved so now it wont line up with the crank. I messed with it for a good hour and still cant figure how it lines up. I got it to partially to go on but it doesn’t slide all the way in and i dont want to break anything so ill have to do some research first.





 

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Take the front crank seal out of the timing cover, otherwise it will be very difficult to line the pump up to the crank.
With the seal out, you can see exactly how it needs to go on.
You will definitely need an extra set of hands when you are putting the cover on and lining up the pump at the same time, otherwise you will smear sealant all over the place.
Make sure to use the Toyota FIPG sealant on the cover, not Permatex etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Take the front crank seal out of the timing cover, otherwise it will be very difficult to line the pump up to the crank.

With the seal out, you can see exactly how it needs to go on.

You will definitely need an extra set of hands when you are putting the cover on and lining up the pump at the same time, otherwise you will smear sealant all over the place.

Make sure to use the Toyota FIPG sealant on the cover, not Permatex etc.


Thank you for helping out again! I was thinking if anything I could take apart the pump and see how it slides on then install it but your idea sounds better. Hopefully I don't mess up the crank seal removing it. I was able to get on prodemand and it says to use ThreeBond 1207B. This stuff is no joke. It starts to harden up with in minutes, well the skin does. I had to remove it all since I couldn't get it on...sucked.

Prodemand says install within 3 mins and bolt down within 10 mins.





Is all that burnt oil / residue normal ?



with modern oil and good intravels for oil changes , i wouldnt think so ?



thanks


I've seen it in other engines. I was definitely surprised when I saw all of it also. I've only owned the truck for 10k miles. The intervals is suppose to be 10k oil changes but I change mine every 5k miles. The previous owner said he took it regularly for oil changes. The Army had it before him. It was wrapped and used for recruiting. Somewhere down the line someone didn't use the right oil or took it too late.

 

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Thank you for helping out again! Hopefully I don't mess up the crank seal removing it.
No problem.
Do install a new crank seal after you remove the current one out of the timing cover.
They are cheap and will save you the time having to replace it again if it leaks.
They usually get a bit mangled when removing them.
 
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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
No problem.

Do install a new crank seal after you remove the current one out of the timing cover.

They are cheap and will save you the time having to replace it again if it leaks.

They usually get a bit mangled when removing them.


Removing the crank seal worked perfectly. I wish I knew before hand, i would've been done by now. I did purchase a new crank seal but I think I could've reused the new one i pulled out BUT for the 20 some odd bucks for a new one saves a headache if it didn't seal correctly.



I got front cover and everything on the front cover installed. I would've had the valve covers installed but I'm missing the one set of orings. There are 3 different ones. I have 2. I'll get them at the dealer this week. This week will be busy with July 4th and family coming over. I may be able to get some work done but we'll see.



ViktorG when you fill the cooling system do you use a venturi vacuum kit? I use it on tractors and it works great to get all the air pockets out. I've never used it on a regular automobile though. I'm not sure the components can withstand -25 vacuum.

First pic is the orings under the valve cover. Still need to get the other one im missing.
Second pic is the oil filter housing orings, oil pump front cover oring, and new crank seal that I picked up. I missed getting the oil filter housing orings and oil pump front cover oring first time around.
I may edit the first post after I'm done with all the parts needed so whomever wants to tackle this job will have them.



 
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ViktorG when you fill the cooling system do you use a venturi vacuum kit? I use it on tractors and it works great to get all the air pockets out. I've never used it on a regular automobile though. I'm not sure the components can withstand -25 vacuum.
We don't use any type of vacuum filling device at work.
I've heard of them but don't have any experience with them.
 
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Discussion Starter #20
We don't use any type of vacuum filling device at work.

I've heard of them but don't have any experience with them.


Is there a bleed screw you open up to get rid of the air pockets?
They work great! The Tractors I work on hold up to 9 gallons of antifreeze. I put the system in a vacuum and then open up the petcock to the antifreeze drained. I might have to put the system in a vacuum 2-3 times but it doesn’t take long.

I just picked up the last of the orings i needed but it doesnt look like ill be able to get them in this week. Most likely tuesday.


 
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