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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just got a used '07 Tundra Reg Cab 4.7L...going to change the oil this weekend. my first time on a tundra. two questions:

1. 5w-30 is right oil type for 4.7L?

2. Watched a video on youtube, is the oil filter on an '07 the traditional closed canister type? The video I watched the filter was 'open' meaning you could see the filter cartridge.

thx.
 

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Easy to check before you head to the parts store, look at the filter to see what it is. The oil cap should indicate the oil weight to use.

Probably worth changing the rear diff fluid as well when you have some time. If 4x4, then change the front and transfer case fluid as well.
 

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You can't just look at the belt, you need to take it apart to see it and if you're going to do that you might as well replace it + the water pump and associated parts.
 

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That means nothing. Did you get in in writing the belt is good? There is documentation it has been changed? It has needed to be changed at least once.,
What is the recommended maintenance interval for the belt, and is it in time or miles? Other vehicles I've owned called for timing belt replacement every 60-80K miles, which would normally be somewhere around 4-8 years, so yes, it should have been replaced at least once. It probably has been, but if it's not documented, the next owner has to just bite the bullet and get it done to be safe.

As Azblue says, there is no way the timing belt and water pump can really be inspected without doing the work to do the actual replacement. All the inspection shop can tell you is it's fine right now because the engine is running and coolant isn't leaking out the front. But, 15 minutes after the inspection, all bets are off. For that reason, timing belts have to be changed on recommended time or mileage intervals. Water pumps that are driven by buried timing belts are usually replaced, whether they need it or not, just to insure you won't have to go back again prematurely.

I THINK Toyota designs "non-interference" engines, but YOU will need to confirm that, along with trying to research the maintenance history of the truck to confirm the date/mileage of the last timing belt change. A "non-interference" engine is designed so that if the timing belt fails, then the moving pistons don't hit the valves that have quit moving. If yours is a "non-interference" engine, then you are simply stuck on the side of the road waiting on a tow, but at least you won't need a new engine. If it's the other kind, then a timing belt failure leads to unmitigated mechanical disaster.
 

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What is the recommended maintenance interval for the belt, and is it in time or miles?
I believe it's 7 years or 90K miles.

Dave
 
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I assume the OP is young and not experienced. As the oil specifics are on the engine. The engine and the truck will last a long time but the truck is due for stuff. Most likely the struts and shocks have served their life. Fluids including the axle(s), coolant and other things are probably due. Sellers don't usually do this stuff on a vehicle they are selling.
It may even have the original cabin filter.
While it will cost now, it will save it from being a money pit.
Knowing the mileage and the general location of the vehicle will help in guidance. Rust is more of a concern in maine than arizona
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I assume the OP is young and not experienced. As the oil specifics are on the engine. The engine and the truck will last a long time but the truck is due for stuff. Most likely the struts and shocks have served their life. Fluids including the axle(s), coolant and other things are probably due. Sellers don't usually do this stuff on a vehicle they are selling.
It may even have the original cabin filter.
While it will cost now, it will save it from being a money pit.
Knowing the mileage and the general location of the vehicle will help in guidance. Rust is more of a concern in maine than arizona
LOL. I wish I was young! Just outta practice. Havent worked on my own vehicles in decades. First truck I've had in long, long time so decided to start doing some of the work myself again. Never even thought to check oil cap for oil type, dont think they used to have that on the oil caps? Either way, I got it done. Not too bad. Skid plate is PITA. Long time since I've had oil and grease in the fingernails!!

Scheduled maintenance on timing belt is 108 mos or 90k miles. Mine is 10 years old w/ 60k miles. Will have local shop do the timing belt and water pump and other recommended posts on here. I trust the local shops opinion, honest guy, so will see what he says in terms of catching up on service items.

Cheers.
Mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I went thru the previous owner's service records. He had 60k service done.

-oil change
-replace cabin filter
-axle shaft seal: rear axle, inner seal, right side [includes bleed brakes] - repack and adjust bearings (where applicable)
-Power steering pump drive belt: remove and replace

Based on records it look like most of the recommended service is up-to-date. Now I have to decide whether to have timing belt/water pump replaced now even though truck is running well or wait until 90k miles, even though I'm pass the 108 mos timeframe.
 

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The belt doesn't let you know it is going to fail. It just does and it is an interference motor so you could be looking at complete rebuild or replacement.
My Lexus had the water pump go the evening of the start of a long weekend, on the hottest day. The belt still looked ok even though I was a couple of thousand miles short of recommended replacement time.
I've been lucky as I had had 2 vehicles brake belts and not cause damage. One was a new belt only a few months old.
 
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