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post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old 12-06-2017, 11:31 PM Thread Starter
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Rotating tires?

Just wondering how many of you rotate your tires? I've had good luck with the 255/70/18 Michelin ltx m/s2. I also run them on my wife's FJ with a 265 size. I have gotten at a little over 70k on the both sets.(I replace them at 6/32) I went close to 30k on the first 2 sets of Bridgestone I used. I bought a new set today( Michelin)and discount was surprised when I told them I never rotate my tires. The rear tires were 5/32 and 6/32, both fronts were at 7/32. My wife started driving the 2010 Tundra a few weeks ago and said she noticed the rear tires would spin from a stop. I told her less gas pedal usually remedies this problem.
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post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old 12-07-2017, 01:57 AM
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Most of the tire outfits will do the rotations for free. Hey, I'm retired so I like to do it myself. Every five thousand miles weather they need it or not it gets done. So far, so good.
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post #3 of 9 (permalink) Old 12-07-2017, 06:42 AM
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Every oil change so thats 10K on the sequoia and 7500 on the pilot and sonata or yearly, sometimes we don't make it to the mileage.

Drive wheels go straight to the other end and non drive wheels cross.

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post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old 12-07-2017, 08:42 AM
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Tire rotation is important, and becomes more important if you have ANY misalignment or shock/strut wear. Rotation really doesn't fix suspension problem(s), but it will spread the poor wear pattern over all the tires. Your tires should be observed closely and often, and any suspension problems addressed before bad wear patterns develop or a tire is ruined. Rotation simply takes a little pressure off being hyper-vigilant in this task.

At my age, rotating tires is a lot of expended energy for little tangible result. It's better for me to let a garage or tire dealer do the rotation because they have the equipment to do it efficiently and easily. Tire stores (like Discount) offer free rotation because it gives them the opportunity to inspect your tires relatively frequently, and offer you new tires as soon as you need them. Quid pro quo. Being frugal (tight), I will defer on the replacement offer if I know the tires have a few more miles to optimal replacement.

Ditto on Big Shasta's rotation pattern. That's what vehicle manufacturers recommend, but it's hard to find tire employees that will not simply "X" the tires. You will have to request the proper rotation pattern, and for the lug nuts to be hand-tightened and/or torqued...a nice tip will be in order for your anally retentive requests.

Last edited by OldGuy43; 12-07-2017 at 08:58 AM.
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post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old 12-07-2017, 08:54 AM
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I purchased my KO2's at Discount Tire and I get them faithfully rotated, for free, every 5000 miles.

I thought of doing it myself, but last time I was at Discount Tire I watched them rotate my tires and I was amazed at what a good job they do.

They have a little thingy they attach to their air hose that cleans the threads of the lugs,and they balance the tires before rotating them. They also use a torque wrench.

I'm at 36,000 miles on my KO2's and I'm amazed at how well they are wearing.

I'm not particularly hard on my tires, my truck is mostly a "grocery getter", with a few long fishing trips per year and no towing, but getting 50K out of my tires should be no problem at all. I'm kinda hoping 60K is within reach.
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post #6 of 9 (permalink) Old 12-07-2017, 09:02 AM
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Every oil change (5K miles) I take it to America's Tire for the free tire rotation.

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post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old 12-07-2017, 11:34 AM
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I rotated my old Michelin LTX/MS2 about every 7,000 miles and I got 73,000 miles out of them until they were at 2/32. I loved those tires but wanted to get a more aggressive tire and went with the Terra Grappler 275/65/18. These have a 65,000 mile warranty and after only putting 3,000 miles on them thus far, I see no signs of wear.

The tires are holding up nicely and at first I wasn't sure if I wanted them after reading the few negative reviews, but I loved the look of them.

I know of some who don't rotate their tires and they get the full mileage out of them but I think it's good to rotate because the front end is heavier if nothing else.


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post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old 12-07-2017, 03:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Shasta View Post
Drive wheels go straight to the other end and non drive wheels cross.
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldGuy43 View Post
Ditto on Big Shasta's rotation pattern. That's what vehicle manufacturers recommend, but it's hard to find tire employees that will not simply "X" the tires.
I rotate regularly using the rotation pattern given in my owner's manual. Drive wheels go straight to the other end and non-drive wheels also go straight to the other end. I checked a 2012 Tundra owners manual and it shows the same recommended rotation pattern as for the Sequoia. No "X" for any wheels.

Can anyone explain why the tires should or should not be rotated with an X pattern. The owner's manual for every car and truck I have owned since radial tires came out have recommended the same straight front-to-back pattern; no "X" for any wheels.

Is the front-to-rear (without X) rotation pattern given in the owner's manual simply over-conservative to cover the case where someone might mount directional tires? If not using directional tires, is it better to ignore the owner's manual and use Big Shasta's rotation pattern?

I note that authoritative web pages today seem to add support to using Big Shasta's rotation pattern: Tire Rack Tire Safety

The first car I owned with radial tires was a 1977 Toyota Corona wagon. At the time I was curious about why the recommended tire rotation pattern changed with the introduction of radial tires. So when the original Michelins were near their end of useful life I decided to do an experiment. For the last rotation I did an "X" rotation just like we always did previously with bias-ply tires and then kept a close eye on the tires to see if there was any adverse effect. I soon noticed that all four tires were developing visible external cracks around the circumference at the base of the tread. It looked like the tread was getting ready to separate on all four tires. So I replaced the tires and have stuck with the recommended straight front-to-back rotation pattern ever since.

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post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old 12-07-2017, 05:15 PM
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Originally Posted by MtnClimber View Post
I rotate regularly using the rotation pattern given in my owner's manual. Drive wheels go straight to the other end and non-drive wheels also go straight to the other end. I checked a 2012 Tundra owners manual and it shows the same recommended rotation pattern as for the Sequoia. No "X" for any wheels.

Can anyone explain why the tires should or should not be rotated with an X pattern. The owner's manual for every car and truck I have owned since radial tires came out have recommended the same straight front-to-back pattern; no "X" for any wheels.

Is the front-to-rear (without X) rotation pattern given in the owner's manual simply over-conservative to cover the case where someone might mount directional tires? If not using directional tires, is it better to ignore the owner's manual and use Big Shasta's rotation pattern?...
Huh. You are correct...page 426 of the 2017 Tundra owner's manual DOES show only front/back on the same side. That's the first time I ever remember seeing that recommended.

This new Tundra is my first new Toyota in a long time, simply because the last one lasted a very long time. I could have checked the Toyota Repair Manual on my 86 4Runner, but it went with the truck to the new owner...sold for classic money. My "other" car company experience has been the opposite of yours.

All cars in-between my Toyota cars have been those made by Big Three companies that start with a "G", or an "F", but will remained unmentioned to avoid an avalanche of childish red thumbs.

The latest model is a 2008 of "G" persuasion, and the owner manual shows moving front drive wheels straight to the rear, and "Xing" the rear tires to the front. Aren't tires essentially the same today as they were in 2008? The next latest model was a 2006 American sports car of the longest production history...no rotation on that one; all four tires were directional, and the rears were much larger than the fronts, which were pretty huge.

As to why present-day rotation pattern SHOULD be different than for the old bias tires, I was told long ago that the direction of rotation, and therefore the mounting sides, should not be changed with steel-belted radial tires. I have no idea if that changed with the movement from steel to fiber belts. Toyota's recommendation executes that steel-belted tire protocol to the letter; other car companies and tire authorities now seem to think it's not that critical.

If it makes no difference to today's fiber-belted tires, then I suspect the recommendation of "other" car companies does equalize the wear a little better, since all tires will eventually be in all four locations. I don't know myself, but it's probably better to stick with the OEM recommendation; Toyota's is certainly easier.

Last edited by OldGuy43; 12-07-2017 at 05:32 PM.
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