Tranny Temp Message on a 3100# trailer normal? - TundraTalk.net - Toyota Tundra Discussion Forum
User Tag List

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-08-2019, 02:54 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 40
Thanks: 31
Thanked 10 Times in 7 Posts
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 28 Post(s)
(Thread Starter)
Tranny Temp Message on a 3100# trailer normal?

All,

I'm hoping to learn some information here, as well as get an idea of what I should do with the truck.

Long story short:
I'm camping with a 3100# travel trailer. I'm estimating about 1500 lbs in cargo, water, and people, so a total weight of 4600#.

I pull it without issue in 96 degree heat for about 2.5 hours. I finally get to the camping location and find that the trailer parking spot is up a 200ft long steep hill (100 foot total rise) (gravel road) with no way to turn around at the top.

So I start backing the trailer up into this spot.

I starts to slip on the gravel, so I put it in 4 hi. I'm going pretty slow because I'm backing up and need a spotter to tell me where I'm at.
About 3 minutes of this, I get the Tranny Temp warning light. - At this point I'm pretty pissed off (about the camping spot being is such a crappy spot), and try flooring the truck (I don't think rationally when pissed off), but the truck doesn't move at all even though it's floored.
So I put it in 4 low. - Now I have power & can keep backing. About 1 minute of continued backing, I notice the light has turned off.
I finish backing, and have been back from the trip for over a week. There hasn't been any lights, warnings, clunks, or return trip issues. If anything, I've noticed better gas mileage than before, but I doubt that's related.

Here are a few questions:
1. Is it normal for a 4600# trailer (loaded weight) in a 5.7 Platinum CrewMax to cause the tranny temp light to turn on? (I took it to toyota, and they said the fluid and everything was fine)
2. Why would putting it into 4 low turn the light off? I would think 4 low would be harder on the transmission?
3. Why did flooring it in 4 high produce no movement (yep, I don't understand 4 wheel drive or torque converters - please explain it to me).
4. I honestly feel like I wasn't pushing the truck beyond any limits. If you disagree, please explain why so that I can learn.

Thanks in advance!
Sam Talbot is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-08-2019, 03:43 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 144
Thanks: 51
Thanked 20 Times in 17 Posts
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 50 Post(s)
Garage
Reversing up the hill is "slipping" the torque converter a lot and putting a significant load on the engine. You're also at lower rpms which doesn't spin the engine fan as much which contributes to the heat. putting it in 4 low is much less of a load on the engine and transmission which generates less heat, and the engine will be running faster, which will push more air from the fan. i dont know the gear ratio's for 1st gear vs reverse gear off hand but i bet reverse is a "higher" gear which also contributes to the load etc. it was a bad combination of circumstances which caused your issue. IMHO.
jmansouri is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to jmansouri For This Useful Post:
Powertechn2 (08-13-2019)
post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-08-2019, 08:56 PM
tjm
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 234
Thanks: 5
Thanked 123 Times in 87 Posts
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 36 Post(s)
A 30 degree slope for 200 feet? I wouldn’t have attempted it forward, much less backwards.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
tjm is offline  
 
post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-09-2019, 10:45 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Northern Maryland
Posts: 638
Thanks: 158
Thanked 173 Times in 140 Posts
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 176 Post(s)
Not uncommon to heat the trans after towing and arriving on a hot day , idling while you check in and such .. THEN slow back n forth trailer positioning multiple times .

I have done it ( ford ).

Some recommend using 4 Low for this , especially up hill trailer backing . The extreme gear multiplication helps allot .

2018 TRD OffRoad 5.7 gasser
24hrsparkey is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to 24hrsparkey For This Useful Post:
Sam Talbot (08-12-2019)
post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-12-2019, 02:11 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 40
Thanks: 31
Thanked 10 Times in 7 Posts
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 28 Post(s)
(Thread Starter)
Thanks for all the comments and help.

Related question... This weekend I was on a beach road that was only 2 lanes wide (one up and one down). The shoulders are very soft (not compacted) sand.
I had to turn around on this road, so I started to do a 3 point turn, putting my front wheels (in 2wd) into the sand. The road is about 8 inches higher than the sandy shoulder.
When I went to reverse out, it seemed as if the transmission was slipping (even though my drive wheels are on pavement). I put it in 4 high, which helped a little and it got me out. I realize that it was sunk 8 inches into sand, but there wasn't anything attached to the truck (no trailer).

This doesn't seem normal to me. Should I take the truck in for a slipping transmission?

Thanks in advance
Sam Talbot is offline  
post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-12-2019, 02:59 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 40
Thanks: 31
Thanked 10 Times in 7 Posts
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 28 Post(s)
(Thread Starter)
Corrected Numbers

Quote:
Originally Posted by tjm View Post
A 30 degree slope for 200 feet? I wouldn’t have attempted it forward, much less backwards.

Thanks for pointing out my error. I was going off memory, but thanks to google earth and other internet awesomeness, I can give you actual distances.

Run was 160 feet.
Rise was 35 ft.

So the slope was actually 18% (35/160). Would you still not have tried it, if not why not?

Thanks!
Sam Talbot is offline  
post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-12-2019, 03:35 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 144
Thanks: 51
Thanked 20 Times in 17 Posts
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 50 Post(s)
Garage
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sam Talbot View Post
Thanks for pointing out my error. I was going off memory, but thanks to google earth and other internet awesomeness, I can give you actual distances.



Run was 160 feet.

Rise was 35 ft.



So the slope was actually 18% (35/160). Would you still not have tried it, if not why not?



Thanks!
As I mentioned before, the reverse gear is a "higher" gear than first gear so you will have less power. I looked it up and reverse is a 3:22, and first is 3.52... Not a huge difference but notable. When your front wheels are stuck in the sand you'll need a good bit of power to pull you out. Without driving it, it's hard to say if you are having an actual issue. Once again 4low would have made it much easier but it obviously wasn't necessary.

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
jmansouri is offline  
post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-12-2019, 04:41 PM
Member
 
Radial GT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Northern Minnesota
Posts: 40
Thanks: 0
Thanked 12 Times in 9 Posts
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Always 4lo when backing up the trailer on anything less than flat ground. Even backing up my 7700# travel trailer in my driveway, which is flat, I notice a lot of slipping of the torque converter if I leave it in 2wd. 4lo just makes it seem so effortless, plus it is good to use that transfer case actuator every once in a while throughout the year.

No doubt if you were backing uphill on a hot day, your transmission was not impressed with that.

Happy camping!

08, 5.7L, Limited, Double Cab, TRD, Stock..
Radial GT is offline  
post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-13-2019, 04:29 PM
Senior Member
 
Aaron713's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 103
Thanks: 1
Thanked 23 Times in 19 Posts
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 21 Post(s)
Garage
Exercising the transfer case (There's something about that in the 2018 Owner's Manual..."■Four-wheel drive usage frequency: You should drive in four-wheel drive for at least 10 miles (16 km) each month. This will assure that the front drive components are lubricated.)"


Forward or backward, if you're on asphalt - be aware that in 4wd, maneuvers like tight backing is very hard on your driveline. Common advice says this should be done offroad, and preferably in a straight line.
Aaron713 is offline  
post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-14-2019, 08:25 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Northern Maryland
Posts: 638
Thanks: 158
Thanked 173 Times in 140 Posts
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 176 Post(s)
On one of my Furd trucks i rigged up a 2wd Low set up for trailer backing . Tranfer case in 4wd Low , front hubs still disengaged = 2wd Low. That truck had vacume /electric hubs so it was possible to do. it was pretty simple to accomplish .

I do not think the Tundra has disengaging front hubs ( not positive ) so this mod may not be possible , but 4wdLow can still be used for trailer backing on dirt n gravel . I would not do it on pavement however .

good luck and carry on gents
24hrsparkey

2018 TRD OffRoad 5.7 gasser
24hrsparkey is offline  
post #11 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-14-2019, 08:34 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Posts: 40
Thanks: 1
Thanked 9 Times in 7 Posts
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
When you truck is not moving, or moving slow, and you step on gas hard, what is allowing the engine to turn while the truck tires don't move is the torque converter. The torque converter has plates in close tolerance to each other with transmission fluid in between the plates. One plate is spinning very close to a second plate this is not spinning and the transmission fluid in between creates friction which transfers the torque from the spinning plate to the non-spinning plate. This is how a car/truck can be in gear and stopped with the engine running. The constant pull is the torque converter spinning. But the spinning causes a lot of heat. And the faster you turn the engine, the more friction you create, the more heat you create. That is why when you tried to back up with a high engine load and a high load from the trailer, you created enough heat to cause the transmission temp light to come on.

When a truck is up to speed on a road and you let off on the gas, you can often feel the transmission torque converter lock up which is a set of clutches that come together between the plates and lock them in place. When the torque converter locks up, no more heat is generated. When you step on the gas to accelerate or are pulling something heavy, the torque converter unlocks, the engine speed picks up, and you are back to having the plates spin against each other and generate heat. Pulling trailers with a toque converter unlocked generates a lot of heat and is often the cause of the transmission failing.

As your transmission fluid gets old, it looses it's frictional properties and it takes more engine spin to create the same output force. You may find that a transmission fluid change will help some. Or you may notice no difference. But chances are good it will help.

The other thing going on is that the transmission has pressure in it which are used to make it shift. When the transmission is in gear, the solenoids inside the trans direct fluid to first, second, third, etc gear and when the fluid pressure is sent there, a band clamps down around a shaft and that is how the transmission changes gear. If your transmission fluid is bad, or the transmission needs rebuilt, it may not be building enough pressure to hold the band tight enough to keep the shaft from spinning. This is called slipping. Or the band may be just worn out and can't stop the shaft from turning. But one thing is for sure, a transmission does not slip for long. When the friction surface (like a brake pad) wears off, it's done and time for a complete rebuild.

Poor quality transmission fluid (ie, old worn out fluid) and/or a clogged trans filter and/or leaking seals in the transmission can all cause poor pressure and cause slipping.

It is hard to know if the torque convert was just slipping like normal, or if the low gear band was slipping, or both.

But the moral of the story is don't spin your engine hard when your wheels wont turn or you are under heavy load (like a heavy trailer up hill). Jack rabbit starts, racing, flooring it all the time, etc. That is how you wreck a transmission. And the older the transmission, the more you need to baby it.

Burnt transmission oil smell means things have gone very badly and it is time to go to the parts store and look for something that says "miracle" on the bottle and try to poor that in there.
Mikecol is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

  TundraTalk.net - Toyota Tundra Discussion Forum > Tundra Discussion > Tundra Towing & Hauling

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the TundraTalk.net - Toyota Tundra Discussion Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome